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If you were an employer, would you hire a Trump supporter?

SweetChinMusic

Banned for use of alt account
Member
Sep 19, 2018
184
Being a “one-issue voter” doesn’t exempt you from being criticized for choosing to ignore widely broadcast idiocy and frequently vaunted racism, sexism, authoritarianism, and xenophobia when voting for the most powerful figure in the world. Nor do the preexisting realities of politics begin to justify electing a compelte neophyte and regressive idiot like Trump. The only incredibly complex thing here are the justifications some people come up with to ignore and excuse these basic facts and their own personal failings.
I never said you shouldn't be criticized for your vote. Not once did I say that. However dialing the hyperbole meter to 11 and saying that they are all racists and homophobic/transphobic etc etc is just ridiculous.
 
Dec 24, 2017
6,331
Now you're just arguing in bad faith.

Of course blatant expression of support for KKK member or Nazi would impact the work environment.
So, let's say you have Mexican individuals or LGBT individuals working at your company, and a guy shows up to an interview with a MAGA hat on, or a Confederate flag hat. Would you be cool with asking them to work with and tolerate someone who voted against even treating them like people? How could you do that to them, and why would you if you could avoid it?
 

THE GUY

Banned
Member
Oct 27, 2017
4,223
I employ roughly 300 people in my company. Some of them are contractors who come and go depending on projects being worked on. It's a pretty diverse set of folks since we in London after all, but if I knew you support Trump, or have other messed up beliefs, I wouldn't employ you. Pretty simple. My HR peeps know how it goes and will justify it some way.
 
Oct 29, 2017
385
Like a normal old school boomer generation republican trump supporter ? Yeah sure

The youngish alt right Incel pepe the centipede kekistani kind from the donald ? No.
 
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So, let's say you have Mexican individuals or LGBT individuals working at your company, and a guy shows up to an interview with a MAGA hat on, or a Confederate flag hat. Would you be cool with asking them to work with and tolerate someone who voted against even treating them like people? How could you do that to them, and why would you if you could avoid it?
Many in this thread has explicitly said that if the person in question has ability, the professionalism, and the attitude in their work environment--a.k.a. "not bringing politics in to the office" or "not making a fuss about it"--they would be okay with it. Showing up in an interview with a MAGA Hat or a Confederate flag hat or a Nazi symbol or wearing a KKK hood is "not bringing politics in to the office" and would reflect that that person is not capable of sound judgment for a professional work environment. Of course I wouldn't hire the person. But should I snoop around every potential employee and directly ask what their political affiliation are before I hire them? Is that how it works in your place of work?
 
Oct 27, 2017
3,051
So, let's say you have Mexican individuals or LGBT individuals working at your company, and a guy shows up to an interview with a MAGA hat on, or a Confederate flag hat. Would you be cool with asking them to work with and tolerate someone who voted against even treating them like people? How could you do that to them, and why would you if you could avoid it?
I wouldn’t hire anyone that interviewed without a suit soooooo
 
Nov 24, 2017
172
Why else would someone vote for a flagrant racist? I want to hear reasons.
Maybe some people actually thought he would so called "Drain the swamp". To be honest I don't understand how anyone could believe that BS. But you're voting for a racist if you voted for Hilary or Trump. Let's not forget Hilary's political stances in the 90s. It's one of the reasons why I didn't choose either.
 
Oct 25, 2017
2,948
Someone that admires Trump's behavior and continues to support him wouldn't last long in a team environment like where I'm at. If you do more individualized work, it doesn't really matter. They just become "that guy" in the office.

Voting for Hillary doesn't automatically make you a good person or better employee, for the record.
 
Dec 24, 2017
6,331
Holy shit that is not this thread. The election was two years ago my man.
The poster I was responding to brought it up, not me, my man
Many in this thread has explicitly said that if the person in question has ability, the professionalism, and the attitude in their work environment--a.k.a. "not bringing politics in to the office" or "not making a fuss about it"--they would be okay with it. Showing up in an interview with a MAGA Hat or a Confederate flag hat or a Nazi symbol or wearing a KKK hood is "not bringing politics in to the office" and would reflect that that person is not capable of sound judgment for a professional work environment. Of course I wouldn't hire the person. But should I snoop around every potential employee and directly ask what their political affiliation are before I hire them? Is that how it works in your place of work?
I was specifically forming that scenario in the light of the person I was originally responding to to find out their line and what they consider "harm" in the workplace. In the OP, it says you just magically know.
As much as I would hope it's just trolling I honestly don't think it is. It's quite sad really.
Calling people sad less than 30 posts in is not a great look, SCM.
 
Aug 4, 2018
1,013
California
This... happened once.

Backstory. At my old job, I was part of the hiring committee. Interview processes aren't perfect, and two hours isn't always enough to determine someone's political leanings. Yes, if they came in with a MAGA hat we'd go through the interview only as a formality (we're part of a bureaucracy so stuff can happen) but it'll be a no. But not every Trump supporter has a MAGA hat. After this fact we learn this kid--well, Freshman--is one of those well-to-do comes from a wealthy family that always leans Republicans. Now, with someone who's a Freshman in college, there's room to believe for growth--I'm not going to think of a naive white Freshman the same way I'd approach an old right-leaning white professor like Pinker or Peterson; it's a huge red flag when we realized but not immediate crisis mode. Besides, there isn't much we can do; waiting for contracts to expire is faster than the firing process because bureaucracy. So while he did parrot his views of his parents, our work were an assertive and intelligent bunch (you had to be, for our job) and they spoke out. And while I did have my hands tied, I put pressure where I could (e.g. it was revealed he didn't tip service workers, like ever, so I--perhaps passive-aggressively--made a reminder to tip service workers part of our nightly announcements). Like, I genuinely think he didn't see a lot of these viewpoints before because super wealthy mostly white towns can be politically insulating. In the end, due to the constant intervening of coworkers, he felt proud to vote for Johnson instead of Trump which... is something? Maybe? I honestly don't know. And I think he finally started tipping workers? It's been too long and I had too many people to look after.


So what's my point? I don't know if I have one to be honest. I don't think it's incumbent on coworkers to correct their fellow coworkers views when they're problematic. But... the story felt relevant to the thread and I felt like sharing anyway.
 
This... happened once.

Backstory. At my old job, I was part of the hiring committee. Interview processes aren't perfect, and two hours isn't always enough to determine someone's political leanings. Yes, if they came in with a MAGA hat we'd go through the interview only as a formality (we're part of a bureaucracy so stuff can happen) but it'll be a no. But not every Trump supporter has a MAGA hat. After this fact we learn this kid--well, Freshman--is one of those well-to-do comes from a wealthy family that always leans Republicans. Now, with someone who's a Freshman in college, there's room to believe for growth--I'm not going to think of a naive white Freshman the same way I'd approach an old right-leaning white professor like Pinker or Peterson; it's a huge red flag when we realized but not immediate crisis mode. Besides, there isn't much we can do; waiting for contracts to expire is faster than the firing process because bureaucracy. So while he did parrot his views of his parents, our work were an assertive and intelligent bunch (you had to be, for our job) and they spoke out. And while I did have my hands tied, I put pressure where I could (e.g. it was revealed he didn't tip service workers, like ever, so I--perhaps passive-aggressively--made a reminder to tip service workers part of our nightly announcements). Like, I genuinely think he didn't see a lot of these viewpoints before because super wealthy mostly white towns can be politically insulating. In the end, due to the constant intervening of coworkers, he felt proud to vote for Johnson instead of Trump which... is something? Maybe? I honestly don't know. And I think he finally started tipping workers? It's been too long and I had too many people to look after.


So what's my point? I don't know if I have one to be honest. I don't think it's incumbent on coworkers to correct their fellow coworkers views when they're problematic. But... the story felt relevant to the thread and I felt like sharing anyway.
So you're basically trying to get him fired or put him in a situation where he receives more pressure than others because of what you know about his views, but not in a way that is explicit?

Kind of like a nudge nudge wink wink please realize you're not wanted here?
 
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Oct 25, 2017
5,716
I can understand why small town workers, in industries that are dying out, would be angry and be susceptible to someone even addressing their issues, even in this case with a charlatan that fed lies.

They have the right to express these problems. I wish they understood how corporations and distribution of wealth to a small number of people is to blame. They are getting played, with their false saviors promising a solution that no one will seriously work on.

But when Trump called undocumented workers "criminals, rapists, thieves"

THEY HAD AN OUT

When Trump promoted violence at his rallies to a black protestor

THEY HAD AN OUT

When Trump couldn't denounce Charlottesville white supremacist neo-nazis.

THEY HAD AN OUT

When he started questioning our intelligence services and basic structures of government

THEY HAD AN OUT

When they put children in cages

THEY HAD AN OUT

There is so many of these.

It's like a Twilight Zone episode that is testing how long someone could possibly stay supporting someone like this, except we all have to experience it.

By all means support a different candidate, one that will say they are focused on small town development, that isn't racist if you want.
 
Apr 17, 2018
6,059
Sure, some may be racist, bigots, full of xenophobia, transphobia etc, but if you expect me to believe that the literal millions upon millions of people who voted for Trump are ALL like this you're out to lunch. It's just such a ridiculous notion. For many people they are truly one issue voters. "Oh he said he's bringing jobs, I've been out of a job for months. Trump gets my vote!" Etc.

If you haven't noticed, Trump (like every single politician in history) will say whatever he needs to to get the vote. He has said many things throughout his campaign that range from completely benign, yet still of interest to people (more jobs) all the way up to horrific things that bring out the worst in people (let's build a wall to keep out those shitty Mexicans). Every politician caste their net far and wide to wrangle whoever they can to vote. In the most basic way these people are "complicit", literally due to their vote. However that doesn't necessarily mean that they are praying to the altar of Trump and readying their weapons to kill all the gays and immigrants and shit.

It is such a naive and frankly disgustingly self-righteous way to think this way. This is EXACTLY what American politicians and media have wanted from it's public for a long time. Complete and utter division. Us vs them. To the point where you throw away any and all rational thought as long as it strokes you in that special place that makes you feel as if you are somehow morally superior to others.

This may be hard for you to understand but human beings are incredibly complex creatures, full of nuance and many different layers and depths to what makes them "them", and there are hundreds of millions of people in America. Many millions who voted for Trump. They aren't the Borg, there is always more to things than random hyperbolic blanket statements.
This is a bad generalization of America IMO, but you're entitled to feel that way.

However, I think feeling that way will make you miserable.
These are both ridiculously naive takes. The division has existed since America's inception, and it has been caused by racism. You can directly trace genocide to slavery to slave patrols to the southern strategy to Lee Atwater's genius move to obfuscate racism as "fiscal responsibility." It is the movement of hatred that has always caused this "divide." We don't need to "meet in the middle," we need to let those fuckers know that their politicital alignment is not welcome anywhere, and we will starve them financially if they want to side with child abudcting white nationalists. I don't give a shit how good grandma's stuffing is or whatever else shit you have to support that.

Edit: I'm not saying it is my right to know who the applicant voted for, but if I knew, I would not hire them
 
Oct 26, 2017
2,372
I'm not aware of a company having a hiring policy that includes cherry picking only those whose political affiliations align with your own. I'm pretty sure that's called discrimination?
I was referring to equal opportunity policy. Otherwise I wouldn't want to risk hiring an HR nightmare, especially if the workforce is diverse.
 
Dec 24, 2017
6,331
I guess the real question would be, if you agree to hire a Trump supporter does that mean you agree to everything that Trump represent?

I guess cases can be made for both yes or no, depending on the context.
If you have the privilege to make the right choice and not invite that into your workforce but you do anyways, and knowingly, maybe,
 
Nov 24, 2017
172
I guess the real question would be, if you agree to hire a Trump supporter does that mean you agree to everything that Trump represent?

I guess cases can be made for both yes or no, depending on the context.
Of course not , especially if you hired based on their abilities to do the job. Which is what you should be hiring for anyway.
 
If you have the privilege to make the right choice and not invite that into your workforce but you do anyways, and knowingly, maybe,
Well unfortunately not everybody agrees in what is 'the right choice'. Some would argue that so long as they're capable and not intrusive, then it would be okay. Some would argue that a harsh 100% ban is the way, regardless whether the person is able or not.
 
Aug 4, 2018
1,013
California
So you're basically trying to get him fired or put him in a situation where he receives more pressure than others because of what you know about his views, but not in a way that is explicit?

Kind of like a nudge nudge wink wink please realize you're not wanted here?
I never said that.

When I said I'd rather see him grow as a person, I mean that. Within a supervisor role, my options are limited; I can't force someone to not vote for Trump no matter how unethical I think voting for him is. But I'm not going to pretend that people's political views are necessarily benign things, that they don't impact how fellow coworkers interact or how they work together. If he says something problematic, and his coworkers call him out on it, that's his problem (and by extension my problem since I'm his supervisor). If he came running to me, I'd give him a tough love response. And it's a dynamic that worked; as I said, he wasn't terribly wedded to his views as much as he was isolated from others.

As an aside, tipping is different. I can defensibly put a reminder for people to tip their waiters as long as it's not a requirement to work (it never was nor intended to be). But having pressure on people where a common courtesy is included like that can help normalize practices, I think.

In the end, he wasn't fired (or had his contract expired) but left when he moved for educational reasons. None of us found him to be an unbearable problem, but it was... something.
 
Apr 14, 2018
651
Canada
It largely comes down to a couple things for me: are they qualified for the job? Yes/No. If No, do they seem capable of learning the job (if it's a position that can be trained)? Yes/No. If Yes to either of the two questions, will they be a good fit to the team? Yes/No. If my team is strongly liberal (or on the other hand, largely apolitical in the immediate workplace) and the person I am looking to hire is a loud, proud, staunch Republican and Trump supporter who wears it on their sleeve (literally in some cases), will I hire them? ...in that specific case, most likely not, because they wouldn't fit with the team and work culture and are very likely to cause conflict, which will decrease productivity, working conditions, etc., etc.. Political alignment is never something that's *directly* considered in a hiring decision, BUT if said alignment is going to cause issues with the team, then that's gonna be a no.
 
I never said that.

When I said I'd rather see him grow as a person, I mean that. Within a supervisor role, my options are limited; I can't force someone to not vote for Trump no matter how unethical I think voting for him is. But I'm not going to pretend that people's political views are necessarily benign things, that they don't impact how fellow coworkers interact or how they work together. If he says something problematic, and his coworkers call him out on it, that's his problem (and by extension my problem since I'm his supervisor). If he came running to me, I'd give him a tough love response. And it's a dynamic that worked; as I said, he wasn't terribly wedded to his views as much as he was isolated from others.

As an aside, tipping is different. I can defensibly put a reminder for people to tip their waiters as long as it's not a requirement to work (it never was nor intended to be). But having pressure on people where a common courtesy is included like that can help normalize practices, I think.

In the end, he wasn't fired (or had his contract expired) but left when he moved for educational reasons. None of us found him to be an unbearable problem, but it was... something.
Well since you said 'your hands are tied, but you put pressure where you could' so I thought you put pressure specifically to him because of what you know of his belief and that the others don't like him, i.e if he's well liked by the others because his belief is more in line with them then you would be more lenient to the dude.
 
Oct 27, 2017
735
If they're qualified for the job, yes. If they talk about or act upon their beliefs at work in a way that's problematic, you can fire them.

You shouldn't not hire someone based on their political beliefs. The foot can be on the other shoe at some other point. I know some of you will say you don't want to work for someone who's right-wing anyway - but many people don't have the luxury of picking and choosing their workplace.
 
Oct 26, 2017
2,372
You assume that simply because they voted for Trump, as tens of millions of people did, that they are automatically deemed "an HR nightmare"?
Honestly, it's my personal preference that I wouldn't want to work with a Trump supporter, and I would also want to look out for the work environment for my current coworkers. At this point, anyone who still supports him is a bad person to me, given all the shit this administration has been pulling. However, if I were hiring for an actual company in an actual real scenario, like many others here, I would follow the hiring policy set in place and assess them based on their resume and interview. But this isn't the real world, it's a video game forum so I couldn't really give two shits.

But ok, you got me. You've exposed that the liberals are the true bigots, or both sides or just as bad, or whatever you were going after with your grandstanding.
 

SweetChinMusic

Banned for use of alt account
Member
Sep 19, 2018
184
User Banned (3 Days): Junior phase account trolling and antagonizing other members
Honestly, it's my personal preference that I wouldn't want to work with a Trump supporter, and I would also want to look out for the work environment for my current coworkers. At this point, anyone who still supports him is a bad person to me, given all the shit this administration has been pulling. However, if I were hiring for an actual company in an actual real scenario, like many others here, I would follow the hiring policy set in place and assess them based on their resume and interview. But this isn't the real world, it's a video game forum so I couldn't really give two shits.

But ok, you got me. You've exposed that the liberals are the true bigots, or both sides or just as bad, or whatever you were going after with your grandstanding.
Aw. Muffin. Pointing out that you make hiring choices based solely on the fact their opinion doesn't align with yours isn't grandstanding.
 
Oct 27, 2017
3,064
NZ
At this point anyone who's still an active trump supporter is an asshole/bigot of some sort and/or a complete idiot and I don't think either of those are desirable characteristics in an employee.
 
Oct 25, 2017
12,174
Sure, some may be racist, bigots, full of xenophobia, transphobia etc, but if you expect me to believe that the literal millions upon millions of people who voted for Trump are ALL like this you're out to lunch. It's just such a ridiculous notion. For many people they are truly one issue voters. "Oh he said he's bringing jobs, I've been out of a job for months. Trump gets my vote!" Etc.

If you haven't noticed, Trump (like every single politician in history) will say whatever he needs to to get the vote. He has said many things throughout his campaign that range from completely benign, yet still of interest to people (more jobs) all the way up to horrific things that bring out the worst in people (let's build a wall to keep out those shitty Mexicans). Every politician caste their net far and wide to wrangle whoever they can to vote. In the most basic way these people are "complicit", literally due to their vote. However that doesn't necessarily mean that they are praying to the altar of Trump and readying their weapons to kill all the gays and immigrants and shit.

It is such a naive and frankly disgustingly self-righteous way to think this way. This is EXACTLY what American politicians and media have wanted from it's public for a long time. Complete and utter division. Us vs them. To the point where you throw away any and all rational thought as long as it strokes you in that special place that makes you feel as if you are somehow morally superior to others.

This may be hard for you to understand but human beings are incredibly complex creatures, full of nuance and many different layers and depths to what makes them "them", and there are hundreds of millions of people in America. Many millions who voted for Trump. They aren't the Borg, there is always more to things than random hyperbolic blanket statements.
EVERYone supporting trump is supporting these things and enabling them.

This may be hard for you to understand, but supporting someone who causes harm like this makes you complicit in that harm.

That's it. Fact. No excuses.
 

EthanKart

Banned
Member
Oct 27, 2017
228
So much hate in this thread. I've worked with people who voted for trump \ conservative and have had very good experiences with them for the most part. Wouldn't call them racists either. Couple of nurses I worked with would go the extra mile to help a lot of the minority patients. And they brought in food for the employees a lot. They were actually pretty great great to have around cause they really helped boost the camaraderie between the employees.
 
Oct 25, 2017
1,531
I am 100% not a Trump supporter, but in no way shape or form would I become a hypocrite in answering no to this question. I find it disgusting people that people are judged for things like their race, religion, and sexual orientation. What better would I be as an employer if I didn't hire anyone who didn't support the same political stance as myself. I see people calling Trump supporters bigots, but isn't what the OP is saying he'd do as an employer is by definition the same thing?
 
Nov 21, 2017
3,483
Im myself livin in democracy country, so every person is entitled to their political statuette. I myself wont interfere it unless they are proven to be part of hate speech, etc.
 
Oct 26, 2017
1,476
Of course. Best man/woman for the job gets it. Anyone who says otherwise has never been in the position to hire anyone.

That said, I would not tolerate political talk at work. If they are too pro-trump (or anti) in what they say, then forget it.
 
Oct 28, 2017
491
It’s scary reading a lot of these responses. Deciding whether or not to hire someone based off of who they voted for is wrong. There are so many other better ways to tell if a person is suited for the job or is right for the company.
 
Nov 3, 2017
2,044
People go back and forth politically over time. I'm sure some of the people who voted trump in16 may of voted Obama in 12. Perhaps next election they pick someone else?? I hope whoever is the next president can bring the country together, there's too much polarization in this country.