I'm not paying for console game streaming (Microsoft xCloud, Google Project Stream) what about you?

Are you or would you be willing to pay for console game streaming of current and next-gen games?


  • Total voters
    2,371
Dec 1, 2017
2,341
The Land
I don't have time for artifacting visuals with increased input lag, and I'm not spending more money with my ISP for the pleasure of going through all the bullshit to determine what works in my situation for an acceptable experience.
 
Oct 28, 2017
1,026
Brazil
lol I'm not even trying to point out hypocrisy. The thing is, with music and movies we always had Radio/shows and TV/Cinema, and so owning the content was never the default way to access it. So we got used to it.

I see game streaming as an analogue for Radio/TV but for games. Future generations will grow with it and find it normal to not own things just like we do with movies and music.
 
Oct 27, 2017
310
Seattle
Soon I’ll be spending time divided between two homes, and I’ll be curious whether streaming is a good solution. I’m not curious enough to commit to a subscription before experiencing it, though, so there would have to be some kind of trial using hardware I already own.

Color me skeptical but open to seeing what the full story is. Lack of any pricing model details from a Google is a huge red flag alongside the conspicuous paucity of information on actual content worth streaming.
 
Oct 26, 2017
2,433
I'd be willing to pay if it has the right games and doesnt suffer from connection issues. Basically I need to see a launch lineup, some future titles, and possibly try a beta of it or something akin to that.
 
Oct 28, 2017
1,026
Brazil
Lemme ask you something: is there any way to, legally, play Buck Bumble other than owning a Nintendo 64 and a copy of the cartridge?

Yet somehow I can still listen to Mambo No. 5 whenever I want.
That was quite specific... but there are lot of movies out there that you can't watch legally unless you have the VHS or wait for them to be aired on the TV.
And to a lesser extent music too. Lot of things that I like aren't on Spotify.
 
Mar 5, 2018
89
That was quite specific... but there are lot of movies out there that you can't watch legally unless you have the VHS or wait for them to be aired on the TV.
And to a lesser extent music too. Lot of things that I like aren't on Spotify.
This is true, absolutely. I guess I just care more about games than movies or music. Same goes for books. I guess obscure things will always find ways to fall between the cracks.
 
Oct 27, 2017
4,039
Who knows if you'll even have to pay for it in some respects. I could very easily see Google offering an option where you get to play for say 30-60 minutes if you're willing to watch 3-4 minutes of commercials or something.
 
Oct 27, 2017
1,311
Portland, OR
Give me a good selection of decent games at a fixed monthly price and I'd definitely consider giving Google a shot.

Of course, they'll have to prove the technology works well. I'm coming from a direction of healthy skepticism, but optimistic for the long term feasibility of streaming - a far cry from the 'lol Ouya 2' that seems to be the consensus from many here.
 
Oct 26, 2017
3,094
It always amazes me to see a Era, a tech enthusiast board, be so against new tech. The possibilities of a game being natively made in a network environment vs a static, consumer grade box seem endless once devs learn to design for it.

This isn't going to take away your digital or physical library yet. Why not see where it goes? Test it out?
 
Oct 25, 2017
3,802
Well yeah, true enough, i am using Netflix without giving it a second thought, and it has pretty much replaced most of my collecting habits as far as series and movies go. Then again, i was mainly hopping on that train for content that i could not get anywhere else and now it's been years and years and you know what? It's so COMFORTABLE that i don't WANT to go back.

Exactly what will happen with gaming as well at some point. Which is exactly what i do NOT want to happen though. We get complacent and will be at the mercy of these platform holders collectively, basically giving our freedom away with a smile.

Sure, if things stay civil and there will not be any abuse at a later point (which could be the case once a monopoly is in place for instance) then i am probably ok with it too but there is simply a potential for abuse which is a LOT higher than it ever was with any physical media, that is a fact.
You're so close yet so far :P

I mean, why do you trust Netflix but not a gaming company? Movies go on and off Netflix all the time, and people are fine. Will probably happen with gaming too. But it will be fine. A vast majority of people don't care to accumulate a large gaming library that they want to know is there at all times. If like 10% of your gaming library disappeared, would you even notice? Or is it just there gathering dust on a shelf? Why does it matter to you that you're able to go back to Vampire Rain at any time? How often do you actually do it? Would you REALLY be bothered if you couldn't play it, or would the fact that hundreds of new games come out each new month mean that you'll always find something to play anyway? Again, remember that you also need to consider these questions from the perspective of the average person. The hundreds of millions of people who watch gaming youtube videos every day, like they said.
 
Aug 21, 2018
147
It always amazes me to see a Era, a tech enthusiast board, be so against new tech. The possibilities of a game being natively made in a network environment vs a static, consumer grade box seem endless once devs learn to design for it.
It is a little baffling. It kind of reminds me of a decade back when there was a loud contingent of anti-Steam people because of DRM. I suspect it will be similar with this - stubborn push back followed several years later by the inevitable acceptance. Some people just need their physical game discs and still prefer vinyl records. More power to 'em, I suppose.
 
Oct 27, 2017
1,023
For me there are 3 tiers of interest in media:
1. I like this piece of media so much I want to "own" it and access it offline, lend it, etc
2. I like this piece of media but not to the extent that I would actually spend the additional money to buy.
3. I don't like this piece of media.

Streaming is perfect for the 2nd tier and this is why I like Netflix. Because I can watch a lot of content that I wouldn't otherwise bother to purchase. But if I do like a movie such as Infinity War, I can still choose to buy a hard copy of a 4k UHD disc instead of using my Netflix subscription. Even major music store still allow you to purchase DRM free music that I can copy 100x and store offline.

What really bothers people is the prospect of streaming being the only choice, because that would be a fucking travesty. Streaming being one of many options is perfectly fine.
 
Jan 15, 2018
644
If the cloud streaming services take off then I can reduce my hardware footprint at home. Previously I've had a desktop, an Xbox One and a PS4. Now that Microsoft are putting Xbox games on to Windows 10, it has eliminated the need for the Xbox (that's gone). If Sony put new releases on PlayStation Now, then I'd stream them on my desktop and the PlayStation hardware could also be ditched. So I'm ready. But having seen the light of PC gaming for the last year, there's no way I'd want to be without one now - mainly because of the vast library that is not available on other platforms rather than from a hardware perspective.
 
Mar 5, 2018
90
Right now as a man in my own flat, I'd prefer proper, cutting edge hardware and local, physical gaming. But I could see a future where my future kids are using it instead of having multiple tvs and gaming systems and maybe I'd be tempted to use it during a lunch break at work or something.

I can see a lot of regular gamers using such a service and even beyond. But for me it'll always be limited (I'm the kind of gamer that has broadcast CRT monitors for my retro consoles...)

Having said all that I couldn't vote, I've really no idea how it'll work in the future nor how I might use it...
 
Oct 25, 2017
3,215
New York
I don't remotely know enough about the services, quality, etc to determine whether said services are a good deal or not. I have no qualms about not "owning" my hardware or software. There are very few games I really wish to own and revisit years later, if any, and I find reselling of physical games not worth the effort.
 
Oct 28, 2017
2,984
Anyone who votes no is just fighting the inevitable. There is no reason to buy a 15TF box that sits idle 80% of the time while you are not playing video games. It is super wasteful. Having it in a data center so it gets used all of the time makes way more sense. Now, whether or not streaming tech is there for us to be there in 2019 - maybe, maybe not. I was extremely impressed with AC:O on project stream so I think we are probably there.
 
OP
OP
SharpX68K
Nov 10, 2017
3,288
I want a 15TF (or whatever) box in my house and a library of physical games, mostly single player offline games. Not console-as-a-service, streaming-only.
Where games can be taken down / de-listed, or entire services shut down 2-8 years down the road.

Besides, our internet infrastructure in the U.S. cannot handle what Google (and Microsoft) are proposing. In 15-20 years, things might be more favorable for most of NA, or maybe they won't. The whole country isn't wired like Silicon Valley.
 
Oct 26, 2017
1,707
I don't understand why people are against this. This not only the future, but it also increases access to high quality games. It's a win win for gamers. People who against this are just people who afraid of change. It's actually really funny.
 
May 10, 2018
48
I live in the middle of Silicon Valley, next to a Downtown, and my average download speed is 3-4 Mb/s. I cannot buy into a game streaming service. The internet tech just isn't there for a lot of us Americans who can't get fiber.