Insects going extinct within a century

Oct 27, 2017
936
That's pure ignorance. Think of all the animals that rely on those animals for feeding, from frogs to chameleons to birds to other insects. All animals but humans are an important, positive part of the ecosystem. We can't expect those creatures and plays that are directly benefitial to us to survive when we annihilate everything around them.
Then, we'll need to agree to disagree.
Mosquitoes act as a key food source for fish, birds, lizards, frogs and bats and other animals. Yet no species relies solely on them, as the journal Nature found in 2010. Other insects could flourish in their place, and it seems most species would find alternatives to eat.
https://www.usatoday.com/story/news...-happen-if-we-killed-all-mosquitos/100082920/
 

Vex

Member
Oct 25, 2017
3,204
That's pure ignorance. Think of all the animals that rely on those animals for feeding, from frogs to chameleons to birds to other insects. All animals but humans are an important, positive part of the ecosystem. We can't expect those creatures and plays that are directly benefitial to us to survive when we annihilate everything around them.
ok can you explain to me why we need both gnats and mosquitoes
 
Nov 11, 2017
4,656
ok can you explain to me why we need both gnats and mosquitoes
fish/bugs/birds/bigger predators/balance to ecosystems...


All this bug stuff is cute, but did anyone catch the magnetic pole is shifting is accelerating and we're getting signs of additional magnetic poles, which will cause the Magnetosphere to weaken substantially....? I mean, we're burning at both ends here.. Any food will be irradiated... including us.

We are the one species that could have possibly planned and sustained our survival. But, totally just lol'd.
 
May 17, 2018
1,871
If you eliminate mosquitoes from the ecuation, all those animals will have to increase the amount that they eat from other sources. Those sources will decline and then the animals that eat them will follow. Both mosquitoes and their larvae are often among the most numerous sources of food in their environments, which means the impact of their disappearance would be huge. They are also pollinators. When bees and all these insects that we like are gone, we might need to rely on mosquitoes to sustain ecosystems and pollinate flowers. The amount of animals that eat mosquitoes is insane, and they thrive on so many ecosystems that they will adapt much better than most insects to the hostile world we are creating.

PS: it makes me sick how people here are trivializing the extintion of an entire species based on convenience and personal preference. It explains a lot of how and why we got to where we are today.
 
Oct 26, 2017
323
California
Any chance that the earth can sort of fix itself once we start dying off in mass numbers? Or will it not stop until we're all gone? What I'm wondering is if the planet takes back like 95% of it's area to nature and starts to rebalance everything, would it work? Like, it'd take 100 years, but it could right?
 
Oct 25, 2017
2,408
Any chance that the earth can sort of fix itself once we start dying off in mass numbers? Or will it not stop until we're all gone? What I'm wondering is if the planet takes back like 95% of it's area to nature and starts to rebalance everything, would it work? Like, it'd take 100 years, but it could right?
Absolutely it would return back to normal.
 
May 17, 2018
1,871
Any chance that the earth can sort of fix itself once we start dying off in mass numbers? Or will it not stop until we're all gone? What I'm wondering is if the planet takes back like 95% of it's area to nature and starts to rebalance everything, would it work? Like, it'd take 100 years, but it could right?
It'd change radically, most animals that we know would be gone, and then life would start evolving again. Think about the dinosaurs; it took a very long time and the dominant group became mammals instead of reptiles. So, yes, life would probably bounce back eventually, but it'd look very different from what you might consider "normal".
 
Oct 25, 2017
2,408
It'd change radically, most animals that we know would be gone, and then life would start evolving again. Think about the dinosaurs; it took a very long time and the dominant group became mammals instead of reptiles. So, yes, life would probably bounce back eventually, but it'd look very different from what you might consider "normal".
Exactly.
 
Oct 25, 2017
5,837
It'd change radically, most animals that we know would be gone, and then life would start evolving again. Think about the dinosaurs; it took a very long time and the dominant group became mammals instead of reptiles. So, yes, life would probably bounce back eventually, but it'd look very different from what you might consider "normal".
Maybe Bush knew what he was talking about:
 
Oct 29, 2017
902
Any chance that the earth can sort of fix itself once we start dying off in mass numbers? Or will it not stop until we're all gone? What I'm wondering is if the planet takes back like 95% of it's area to nature and starts to rebalance everything, would it work? Like, it'd take 100 years, but it could right?
The earth will fix itself. It will take millions of years but it will return
 
Oct 27, 2017
868
People have been talking about the end of the world for millennia based on superstition, but now it feels like we're rapidly approaching the end of life on Earth based on actual scientific observation and the religious among us don't seem to give a damn.
It's a lot easier to monetize a future, theoretical boogeyman (and all the steps you can take to save yourself if you just give!) than the real one.
 
Oct 31, 2017
3,904
I hate defeatism attitude.

This is a serious problem. At the same time, I remember growing up when there was a massive hole in the Ozone layer. The Ozone has actually improved and is in track to go back to 1980s levels by the middle of this century. It's a projection similar to this one with insects.

So it's an issue, but it's also one I can see us tackling successfully.

Dude, I'm a biologist. You don't need to tell me how insects affect everything else. I know. Also I don't think people raking their leaves has all that big an impact on insects. I would say it has much more to do with deforestation and pesticides, something the average everyday person really has nothing to do with.

I'm not saying it isn't a huge problem. Climate change, deforestation, extinction of animals and insects, it's all connected and a lot needs to be done to right the ship again.

What I don't agree with are all the posts saying "Ah man it's over! Humanity is doomed! Extinction imminent! Everyone kill yourselves now to just get it over with!!". Humans are an incredibly adaptable species. I think the idea that we're gonna go extinct in the next few hundred let alone 100 years ludicrous barring a huge asteroid strike or something.

Yes, these are all problems that need fixing and we definitely need to rethink how we live, grow our food etc. if we want humanity to continue to thrive. But all these "We're fucked people! Game over! Humanity had a good run!" posts accomplish nothing but making you look like an idiot
lol'd at the first sentence.

I don't get why people go doom and gloom so easily. It's not like we've never fixed problems in history. Renewable energy has gotten dramatically cheaper, and the use of alternate sources of energy continues to rise. Europe used to be one of the most war-torn areas in the world and were involved in two World Wars. Now how many are allies and in organizations like NATO or the EU?

There are always problems, and this is a potentially big one, but the fact that we have this information is valuable and important.

*Ctrl+F "roaches," gets 0 results*
I love the use of this gif.
 
Last edited:
Oct 28, 2017
126
This IS pretty sobering and alarming, but... in my mind it takes A Lot of work and effort to really remove bugs from a place, right? I would think that with a substantially lower amount of work and effort (like bug farming or something) to boost insect populations back up.

I doubt any action at a higher level will occur on this before uh, November 2020 at the earliest, but this is definitely something we can push back on.
 
Apr 19, 2018
360
Any chance that the earth can sort of fix itself once we start dying off in mass numbers? Or will it not stop until we're all gone? What I'm wondering is if the planet takes back like 95% of it's area to nature and starts to rebalance everything, would it work? Like, it'd take 100 years, but it could right?
If your concern is "Will the Earth be sterilized of life" then no, that will probably never happen short of the annihilation of the planet. There have been plenty of mass extinction events before the rise of humanity and there will be plenty more to follow.

Youve also got the idea that the Earth needs to 'fix itself'. When the meteor that killed the dinosaurs came down, Earth didnt fix itself. The world climate changed and everything that couldnt live in the new climate died and those that could survive began to thrive. Even complete nuclear devastation will probably not blight the earth beyond repair, the problem is that the climate might change to the point that humanity wont find Earth a comfortable place to live anymore and will be one of the species that dissapears.

The planet is fine. Life, as a concept, will be fine. The current creatures living on the planet, including us, are the ones in trouble.
 
Oct 26, 2017
323
California
If your concern is "Will the Earth be sterilized of life" then no, that will probably never happen short of the annihilation of the planet. There have been plenty of mass extinction events before the rise of humanity and there will be plenty more to follow.

Youve also got the idea that the Earth needs to 'fix itself'. When the meteor that killed the dinosaurs came down, Earth didnt fix itself. The world climate changed and everything that couldnt live in the new climate died and those that could survive began to thrive. Even complete nuclear devastation will probably not blight the earth beyond repair, the problem is that the climate might change to the point that humanity wont find Earth a comfortable place to live anymore and will be one of the species that dissapears.

The planet is fine. Life, as a concept, will be fine. The current creatures living on the planet, including us, are the ones in trouble.
I mean "fix itself" in terms of destroying most of humanity but not all while healing whatever damage we did to the point where humanity loses say 91% of its population, but the earth is back to what it was say pre-industry.