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IronERA | OT | vol. 1 mise en place

Oct 25, 2017
2,799
Wow, this is a great recipe. Tastes amazing. I would suggest adding some corn starch to the marinade.


Only mistake, I wasn't careful with the heat. Got burnt sugar on my cast iron...

 
Oct 25, 2017
282
Hey y’all, finally got an Instapot for Christmas and I’m looking for good recipes to try. Any suggestions or links?
Era has a separate instant pot thread which is a great resource. If you're on Facebook, the official instant pot community has tons of useful info and recipes too.
 
Oct 27, 2017
4,720
I made homemade chicken nuggets, then decided to instead coat them in Korean spicy sauce (gochujang, soy sauce, rice wine vinegar, garlic, sesame oil, etc) and saute with onions and red bell pepper. I had the pan a little too hot, and it came out ugly, but tasted good as hell.

 
Oct 25, 2017
2,799
I made homemade chicken nuggets, then decided to instead coat them in Korean spicy sauce (gochujang, soy sauce, rice wine vinegar, garlic, sesame oil, etc) and saute with onions and red bell pepper. I had the pan a little too hot, and it came out ugly, but tasted good as hell.

! I made that exact same sauce today too (but with some sugar added).

I finally got over my fear of deep frying, made some Korean style fried chicken. I won't need to pay $9 for 6 wings anymore...

 
Nov 15, 2017
2,164
Made some egg puffs for a brunch I was heading out to. Something I ate a ton of as a kid. (Puff pastry sheet + curried onions/tomatoes + boiled egg).



Also finally bought a decent probe thermometer. Will make some forays into deep frying now, maybe with some Korean fried chicken.

love my Javelin Pro
 
Oct 28, 2017
579
A tad bit boring going back to some old classics for Christmas... loaf turned out nice.



And part of the final spread; wilted spinach salad, roasted mushrooms with garlic, capers and parsley, ricotta fritters and sauce, and a roasted squash with tahini, pine nuts and zatar.

 
Oct 28, 2017
774
A tad bit boring going back to some old classics for Christmas... loaf turned out nice.

Beautiful loaf. Sourdough? I just started a starter. Hopefully in four days it'll be ready to be used.

Last post of 2018 for me. Fried chicken wings. The wings were marinated in fish sauce, soy sauce, shaoxing wine, sugar, msg, mushroom powder, black pepper, and chopped scallions. It's a recipe my mom's been making for me since I was a kid. I like to heat the oil up to 325 F before dropping in the wings, and I have them maintain a temperature range between 278-300 F. And I fry them for 13 minutes which is a long time considering they're probably cooked at around 9 m. The reason why I go longer is to achieve the color of crust I want, plus the longer you fry, the more dried out the crust becomes, making it crispier.

Those black flecks are the scallions. They become very sweet when they're fried this way.

I also made a second attempt at Kenji's chocolate chip cookies. On my first attempt, it came out smooth topped and a bit cakey in the middle. I wanted something more craggly on top and chewy. I thought maybe i didn't disperse the baking soda well enough or I didn't beat enough air into the egg+sugar mixture. So I tried it again. Same results. It spread too much and the middle was cakier than I'd like. I prefer Stella Parks' recipe for chocolate chip cookies.

 
Oct 28, 2017
774
It’s a new year which means I’m trying to eat healthy again. No more fried chicken or chocolate chip cookies until I shave off some pounds! I made these chicken thighs marinated in a citrus marinade from Epicurious. It was a very good recipe and I plan to include it in my rotation while I diet and pretty clean eating! Granted there’s vegetable oil but you can substitute some other oil if you wish or even leave it out.

I broiled the shit out of it for 30 m on a wire rack until the skin was crackly and browned. Those blackened bits are the best parts. And while 30 m may seem long for chicken, they were extremely juicy. The marination likely was a factor even though I could only marinate them for 4 hours. It being dark meat was a big help :)

Here’s a snippet of the ingredients for those curious.

https://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/citrus-marinated-chicken-thighs-51178850
INGREDIENTS
  • 1 bunch scallions, thinly sliced
  • 1/2 bunch cilantro, leaves and tender stems only
  • 2 garlic cloves, chopped
  • 1 teaspoon finely grated lime zest
  • 1 teaspoon finely grated orange zest
  • 1/4 cup fresh lime juice
  • 1/4 cup fresh orange juice
  • 1/4 cup reduced-sodium soy sauce
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 1 tablespoon kosher salt
  • 2 pounds skin-on, bone-in chicken thighs
I’m roasting a turkey breast and turkey legs tomorrow. Then in the coming days I plan to make some jerk chicken following a recipe from Food& Wine. Lots of chicken these next 3 months....
 
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Oct 28, 2017
2,206
I didn't do much cooking this year. My family and the in laws did most of the heavy lifting and we spent new year's eve at a restaurant (hats off to the fine folks working that night)






That's porcini rice with torreznos (chunky and meaty pork cracklings) and beet spirals (the missus got some extremely potent chorizo spirals), fire roasted octopus with potatoes, pimentón and black salt, an extraordinary lamb roast (I personally think that ring molds are lame and passe, but it was so good I could easily ignore that) and a huge brie torrija with dark chocolate.

Not shown: all the amazing entrees (Stilton cheese and micuit with violet gelee, thai-like scallop and king prawn on a grilled roasted mango and endive salad) and a €140 bill for two. Not too bad when you consider the date and included liberal wine refills.

Also, I made eggnog to spite the haters and I still have some in the fridge. It's pretty good, but also has like a 1/2 cream to golden rum ratio, so yeah.
 
Oct 25, 2017
2,799
I had been a bit sceptical about all-clad and the prices they charge. Bought a weeknight pan from their factory seconds sale and have been using it a lot. Might need to buy a mid-sized sauce pan in the next sale.
 
Oct 25, 2017
1,730
So I made another soup(chicken, ginger, broken up rice, sweet potatos, garlic). Bit surprised the recipe only needed water and not stock but it was really good. Super gingery. Anyways im starting to get the appeal of soup.



Also I recently found a glass pot stashed away in things left by previous residents and im curious what I can even use it for? Is it like an oven thing?
 
Oct 28, 2017
774
So I made another soup(chicken, ginger, broken up rice, sweet potatos, garlic). Bit surprised the recipe only needed water and not stock but it was really good. Super gingery. Anyways im starting to get the appeal of soup.



Also I recently found a glass pot stashed away in things left by previous residents and im curious what I can even use it for? Is it like an oven thing?
I've been seeing this recipe posted all over Bon Appetit social media pages lol. It's definitely a riff on the looser rice congees/porridges found in many asian cultures. I'm Vietnamese and have been effectively eating that dish since I was a toddler. There are a lot of variations out there. My mom will use either chicken or duck. And I've always preferred the looser, brothier version because its what my mom cooked. I personally haven't eaten a version that uses sweet potatoes, but adding sweet potatoes and swapping in lemon instead of lime is a very Bon Appetit thing to do. :P ;)

Can't really go wrong with a rice porridge, especially in winter.
 
Oct 27, 2017
4,720
Making me want to break out the Instant Pot and experiment with soups again. My last Thai curry turned out pretty well. Looked pretty at least.
 
Oct 25, 2017
1,730
Can't really go wrong with a rice porridge, especially in winter.
It was my first time eating a rice porridge and I really dug the texture. My usual go to winter food is stew which is unfortunate cause I am terrible at making stews.

Also why is that a super Bon Appetit thing to do? I've only really gotten into the cooking youtube scene in the past year and don't really know much about them other than their kitchen is a way fancier than anything I'll ever own.
 
Oct 28, 2017
2,206
Rice porridge is kinda meh. But at least it's not grits. Fuck grits.

I've only really gotten into the cooking youtube scene in the past year and don't really know much about them other than their kitchen is a way fancier than anything I'll ever own.
They do have a wild kitchen. I know Condé Nast is rolling in it, but that's really exhuberant even for a wealthy American publishing house, and I've worked with a few.

Some items appear to be second hand, however. So that's interesting.
 
Oct 28, 2017
774
It was my first time eating a rice porridge and I really dug the texture. My usual go to winter food is stew which is unfortunate cause I am terrible at making stews.

Also why is that a super Bon Appetit thing to do? I've only really gotten into the cooking youtube scene in the past year and don't really know much about them other than their kitchen is a way fancier than anything I'll ever own.
I was just poking at Bon Appetit. I used to have a subscription and am somewhat of a fan. But after becoming accustomed to their recipes, you notice the ways they modify or rearrange an existing recipe to make it their own (which i happen to do too btw, not knocking it). And the most obvious way they'd do it is to swap in lemon for lime, or add sweet potatoes.

"wow, this months issue features a sweet potato breakfast taco and lemon infused salsa..uh neat?"
 
Oct 25, 2017
2,799
I like America's Test Kitchen/Cooks Country spaces too. Was thinking about subbing for a bit but their shady billing practices have put me off.

They do have a wild kitchen. I know Condé Nast is rolling in it, but that's really exhuberant even for a wealthy American publishing house, and I've worked with a few.

Some items appear to be second hand, however. So that's interesting.
I assumed some of the stuff came in from the Epicurious merger.
 
Oct 25, 2017
6,961


I made sesame chicken for dinner. The sauce is a little on the rich side, but still delicious. Tastes pretty close to what I usually get at local takeout places. The recipe I found called for rice wine, but I could only find rice vinegar at the supermarket. Not sure if they're interchangeable, but it was a small amount and it worked out.
 
Oct 25, 2017
2,799


I made sesame chicken for dinner. The sauce is a little on the rich side, but still delicious. Tastes pretty close to what I usually get at local takeout places. The recipe I found called for rice wine, but I could only find rice vinegar at the supermarket. Not sure if they're interchangeable, but it was a small amount and it worked out.
I wouldn't have thought that it would be a very good substitute. Sake or dry sherry is usually recommended.
 
Oct 28, 2017
774
I'd heard that about ATK.
I wouldn't have thought that it would be a very good substitute. Sake or dry sherry is usually recommended.
Rice wine and rice vinegar do taste completely different. I love rice vinegar. And I add rice vinegar or white vinegar to a lot of dishes that don't call for it. I love the tartness it adds, particularly in sweeter dishes. And in most cases I add only a small dash because i want it to be subtle, just underneath the surface. So your palate will taste it for a brief second and will turbo charge your saliva glands and wakes it up, because that's what acidic foods do, until the tartness is overtaken by the sweeter flavor profiles.
 
Dec 23, 2018
91
About that time to make some more BIR base gravy similar to what most of the curry houses here in the UK use.

I go from this:



To this:



Which makes enough for 15 curries (double portions):

 
Oct 28, 2017
774
About that time to make some more BIR base gravy similar to what most of the curry houses here in the UK use.

I go from this:



To this:



Which makes enough for 15 curries (double portions):

That's amazing. Can you recommend a recipe? And how well do you think it'd blend into stock? Would it just break or do you think it'd come together? When I make curry soups, like Cà Ri Gà, I use curry powder. But I'd like to try making one using a sauce like this.
 
Dec 23, 2018
91
That's amazing. Can you recommend a recipe? And how well do you think it'd blend into stock? Would it just break or do you think it'd come together? When I make curry soups, like Cà Ri Gà, I use curry powder. But I'd like to try making one using a sauce like this.
Okay this is going to appear extremely long winded but, personally, I think it’s worth the time and effort and there’s something satisfying about creating the gravy from scratch. This will replace your stock in any of your curry based ‘wet’ dishes. 👍🏻

I use this recipe and method from Al’s kitchen here:


Though I also use:

2 red peppers instead of 1
1kg of white and 1kg of red onions (instead of all white)
half a medium white cabbage
a 200g Coconut Block (Blue Dragon or similar)

I also omit the tomato puree

....bring to the boil, reduce the heat and gently simmer the lot with a lid on for about 6 hours, every now and then scraping the bottom with a wooden spoon incase it catches.

When it’s all cooked and I’ve blitzed it, I blend in a 397g tin of condensed milk and a pinch of salt. I know alot of curry houses use condensed or evaporated milk in their gravy for that underlying sweetness.

The end result shouldn’t have an intense flavour if you’re worried that it should.

=====================================

When I’m making a BIR curry I’ll also use a Bunjarra, which is an onion paste that is used near the end of cooking to elevate the dish. This is a good recipe for it here:


As shown in the video, I then place the paste into an ice cube tray, freeze it, pop them out and store them in a zip lock bag in the freezer for future use. 👍🏻👌🏻
 
Oct 28, 2017
774
Okay this is going to appear extremely long winded but, personally, I think it’s worth the time and effort and there’s something satisfying about creating the gravy from scratch. This will replace your stock in any of your curry based ‘wet’ dishes. 👍🏻

I use this recipe and method from Al’s kitchen here:


Though I also use:

2 red peppers instead of 1
1kg of white and 1kg of red onions (instead of all white)
half a medium white cabbage
a 200g Coconut Block (Blue Dragon or similar)

I also omit the tomato puree

....bring to the boil, reduce the heat and gently simmer the lot with a lid on for about 6 hours, every now and then scraping the bottom with a wooden spoon incase it catches.

When it’s all cooked and I’ve blitzed it, I blend in a 397g tin of condensed milk and a pinch of salt. I know alot of curry houses use condensed or evaporated milk in their gravy for that underlying sweetness.

The end result shouldn’t have an intense flavour if you’re worried that it should.

=====================================

When I’m making a BIR curry I’ll also use a Bunjarra, which is an onion paste that is used near the end of cooking to elevate the dish. This is a good recipe for it here:


As shown in the video, I then place the paste into an ice cube tray, freeze it, pop them out and store them in a zip lock bag in the freezer for future use. 👍🏻👌🏻
I would’ve never expected condensed milk. That’s freaking brilliant! I’ll try this recipe soon. Thanks!
 
Oct 27, 2017
534
Hi era cooks, I need your help.

One of the main dishes I eat is a mix of shredded low fat cheese, hot sauce, black beans, and brown rice. I affectionately call this nutrient paste. I basically just microwave a can of black beans, cook a 10 minute bag of brown rice, mix it up, put some shredded cheese on top, and put some hot sauce in. Great macros but its a little bland.

What are some easy ways to make this taste better (and add some more fat and protein)?

Thanks!
 
Oct 28, 2017
774
Hi era cooks, I need your help.

One of the main dishes I eat is a mix of shredded low fat cheese, hot sauce, black beans, and brown rice. I affectionately call this nutrient paste. I basically just microwave a can of black beans, cook a 10 minute bag of brown rice, mix it up, put some shredded cheese on top, and put some hot sauce in. Great macros but its a little bland.

What are some easy ways to make this taste better (and add some more fat and protein)?

Thanks!
This is a Chopped challenge that i would lose. hahaa.

Can you, like, add a side of steak to that. Does that count?
 
Oct 25, 2017
1,730
Hi era cooks, I need your help.

One of the main dishes I eat is a mix of shredded low fat cheese, hot sauce, black beans, and brown rice. I affectionately call this nutrient paste. I basically just microwave a can of black beans, cook a 10 minute bag of brown rice, mix it up, put some shredded cheese on top, and put some hot sauce in. Great macros but its a little bland.

What are some easy ways to make this taste better (and add some more fat and protein)?

Thanks!
What I would recomend is adding chopped cilantro or whatever herb you personally like. Also cumin. Black Beans and cumin are amazing together. That'll make it taste better. You can mix in a tbs of butter maybe? I honestly don't think you need more protein in it tho. Between the chicken and the beans it's already pretty protein heavy.
 
Oct 25, 2017
2,799
Hi era cooks, I need your help.

One of the main dishes I eat is a mix of shredded low fat cheese, hot sauce, black beans, and brown rice. I affectionately call this nutrient paste. I basically just microwave a can of black beans, cook a 10 minute bag of brown rice, mix it up, put some shredded cheese on top, and put some hot sauce in. Great macros but its a little bland.

What are some easy ways to make this taste better (and add some more fat and protein)?

Thanks!
How about some pureed blanched spinach? With some cream and some spices. (Protein + Fat).
 
Oct 28, 2017
2,206
Hi era cooks, I need your help.

One of the main dishes I eat is a mix of shredded low fat cheese, hot sauce, black beans, and brown rice. I affectionately call this nutrient paste. I basically just microwave a can of black beans, cook a 10 minute bag of brown rice, mix it up, put some shredded cheese on top, and put some hot sauce in. Great macros but its a little bland.

What are some easy ways to make this taste better (and add some more fat and protein)?

Thanks!
Just... add some fatty beef and make it a full chili?

Alternative: get into hefty Spanish meat+legume stews


Large amount of meat and vegetable proteins, plus non trivial amounts of fat, plus good carbs. It seems daunty, but a pressure cooker (or even an Instant Pot if you are of that persuasion) takes care of it all by itself.
 
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Oct 27, 2017
4,720
Hi era cooks, I need your help.

One of the main dishes I eat is a mix of shredded low fat cheese, hot sauce, black beans, and brown rice. I affectionately call this nutrient paste. I basically just microwave a can of black beans, cook a 10 minute bag of brown rice, mix it up, put some shredded cheese on top, and put some hot sauce in. Great macros but its a little bland.

What are some easy ways to make this taste better (and add some more fat and protein)?

Thanks!
I would:

1. Get a small rice cooker
2. Use it to cook rice with Adobo seasoning, a packet of Sazon, about a palm full of chopped cilantro, about half that amount of chopped parsley, and four or five tablespoons of Sofrito (you can make it yourself or just buy it in a jar), and if you can find it, some dried chorizo (just chop one link into cubes).

Don't forget to rinse your rice before cooking it.

Then you'd have some flavored rice ready to go for a week or more. That should add some flavor, and you don't even need to know how to cook. The rice cooker does all of the work.

To add some more flavor and texture, before eating the rice heat a little oil in a pan, add some chopped onion, saute until translucent, then add the rice and let it cook until it forms a crispy crust on the bottom.
 
Oct 28, 2017
774
Monster post incoming. I've just posted this on the eGullet forums for Baking, but it also is IronEra-appropriate so thought I'd share here as well.

Here are a pair of baguettes based on MB's French Lean Bread recipe. Shaping an evenly distributed cylinder has proven a struggle. The fact that the vessel I bake in, a Bayou Classic oval cast iron, restricts the baguettes length to 15” (it's actually 16" but you're pushing the limit) means I have little little wiggle room to lengthen one half or shorten the other. I’ve made the recipe using KA’s bread flour (12.7%) and really enjoyed the almost buttery scent of the bread. Below is using Central Milling’s Type 70 Malted (11.5%) which I picked up a few days ago (A two hour drive in the pouring rain through San Francisco up to freaking Petaluma). Coming from KA’s unmalted flour, the crust eruption I saw with CM’s malted flour was pretty jolting. It has a very crispy, craggly, crusty exterior.

Scoring is an issue I’m slowly working to resolve. In the beginning I was an extremely tentative scorer and got zero ears. With my last several batches I’m a lot bolder in getting the blade in there. Overlaps and smooth scoring are an ongoing skill to develop.

As for equipment, I mentioned above that I use a Bayou Oval. Highly, highly recommended over the fish poacher solution offered by MB, for reasons we all know: cast iron retains heat and its heavy lid creates a good seal, attributes lacking in the Norpro fish poacher I previously used.

The cast iron was good, but the crust of my baguettes did not seem all that different than the ones baked in the Norpro. It was dull and not as crisp as I would expect in a baguette. I hypothesized that not enough steam was generated by the single baguette to fill the entire cast iron vessel. So I performed some experiments and found a perfectly acceptable solution: a 10 gram ice cube. After I slide the baguette onto the lid and place on the cover, I use a pair of long metal tweezers to slip the ice cube inside. The result is a crispy crust with a lovely sheen (when seen in person! ).

In this first photo is the bake where I first used an ice cube. Both were of KA bread flour. Both were baked in the cast iron for the exact same amount of time (lid on for 15 m at 470 F, lid off for 10m at 450 F). The baguette on the left did not get an ice cube. The one on the right did get the ice cube. I found the color difference remarkable. The textural difference in the crust was also significant.



Below are this morning’s bake using CM’s Type 70 Malted. Note this is not my first two baguettes I’ve baked, or my tenth and eleventh baguettes. These are baguettes #35 and #36 from Trial 11 (I track my progress!)! It has taken me this many attempts to even get to this point, and the baguettes still aren't evenly shaped. Ahhh.





I’ve had better, more open crumbs using KA’s bread flour. As I become more comfortable using the Type 70 flour, I hope to get a more open crumb. I wonder if the parts of dense dough is due to shaping errors. Perhaps I was too heavy handed with the seam binding during shaping, or maybe during the envelope folding portion I overlapped one edge over more than I should have? Or maybe it's underproofed?



The mise en place for oven loading.



If anyone was curious, here is a photo from my first attempt at making homemade baguettes last September. I gave up for a while after that. I find with anything, but especially in baking, when you do something enough times you start to see progression. And that's what makes shaping and baking baguettes such an addictive endeavor.

 
Oct 28, 2017
774
Your post has given me cravings. 😳

There are times when only a nice bit of French bread or Tiger bread smothered in Lurpak will do.
I'm in the process of making a new batch right now. Gotta love hearing that 4:30 am alarm go off. haha. I agree, spreading some nice butter over a warm slice of white bread, its aroma filling your senses as you bite down on that warm crumb and crispy crust. Hard to beat that!!
 
Oct 28, 2017
774
Baguette cold proofed in the refrigerator for three hours. I intended to bake them after 2 hours, but our whole street lost electricity. I was afraid they'd be overproofed by the time I baked them..they still might've been slightly overproofed but I'm happy with them.