IronERA | OT | vol. 1 mise en place

Funky Papa

Member
Oct 28, 2017
4,176
I could go for some fresh fruit, tbh.

I always pig out on eggs and meat when I'm at an hotel, only to lament the bloat a few hours after the fact.
 

Dascu

Member
Oct 28, 2017
992
I had a bit of a baking disaster the other day. For info, I was using this recipe: https://akispetretzikis.com/categories/toyrtes/toyrta-sokolatas

Everything seemingly went fine, but I did not follow the recipe exactly and let it cool down on a wire rack, but left it in the cake tin. When I later took it out, the bottom was extremely soggy and had a very jelly-like texture. I also noticed that top of the cake was very crumbly and not even. Was this really because I didn't cool it properly, or did I mess something else up in the recipe? I may not have nicely folded in the flour with the rest either.
 

FaceHugger

Member
Oct 27, 2017
9,270
I wish I got to do fun stuff when I was still in the ind. I usually just took pics of me and the gang around the pit getting high.
 
OP
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Infinitebento

Infinitebento

Member
Oct 25, 2017
2,309
c h i c a g o
I haven’t posted in ages since I spent the last 7 months working in alaska.

I’m gonna compile some rad pastry pics and post them in here :)

Im back in Chicago now mentoring to learn savory at a michelin star restaurant under my chef idol so as I’m learning, I’m gonna probably post about all my failures lmfao
 

Deception

Member
Nov 15, 2017
6,634
chicken/green is preferable, also mole/pork or red/pork.

Follow this recipe for Chicken with Green sauce. I've used this recipe before and they are A1. The hardest part is getting the masa to chicken ratio down so just be mindful of that and try not to add too much of either or as they will either have too much masa or not enough and fall apart.

I've spiced this recipe up a bit and did a Chicken with diced poblanos, chiptoles onion and fire roasted tomatoes. Basically Chicken tinga but with less juice so you don't make the tamales soggy. Here's that recipe if you feel like trying that.

https://www.plated.com/recipes/tinga-de-pollo-tacos-with-poblano-and-cotija-cheese

You can also use the red salsa recipe and substitute pork shoulder and cook it nice and slow and shred it. I'm sure you can do the same and find a nice recipe for mole (I don't make this often since my GF doesn't like it) but it should be the same steps.
 

Deception

Member
Nov 15, 2017
6,634
thanks! My wife also doesn't like mole, what's up with that.
I love mole but don't feel like eating it by myself for days so I don't bother lol my grandma taught me her recipes which calls for one Reese's buttercup and it gives the mole this amazing peanut butter-nuttiness that compliments the spiciness of the sauce but I haven't made it in years so can't recall the exact ingredients/ratios.
 

Cosmic Bus

Member
Oct 27, 2017
588
Los Angeles, CA
South American family mole recipes are crazy. We've got a guy at work who lets us use his for an oxtail mole, and it's literally a two page list of ingredients and another page of directions. So much work but very much worth the trouble. I tend to think anyone who claims not to like mole hasn't had a good one.
 

Chitown B

Member
Nov 15, 2017
4,894
South American family mole recipes are crazy. We've got a guy at work who lets us use his for an oxtail mole, and it's literally a two page list of ingredients and another page of directions. So much work but very much worth the trouble. I tend to think anyone who claims not to like mole hasn't had a good one.
True. they are so complex. I think many just see them and think they are a chocolate savory sauce and that's it.
 

Hasseigaku

Member
Oct 30, 2017
1,513
Hey there IronERA. My library is starting a cookbook book club (mostly an excuse to eat, but still) and for the inaugural meeting I'm going to make Tashin because I love Persian/Iranian food. But next month, we have a theme and our them is going to be Italian food. Obviously a lot of people will probably think to bring pasta dishes and I had thought about making polenta or risotto.

But ultimately I think I'm going to attempt tiramisu for the first time. I do have questions though for anyone with experience who is willing to share their thoughts.

1. The Espresso - I don't have access to good espresso either in my hometown or at home. I have a co-worker who goes to Starbucks all the time who would probably be willing to get me an espresso if I gave her money to buy herself something also. I do also have a burr grinder, a french press, an aeropress, and a pourover setup if I wanted to get some fresh roasted coffee and just wanted to make a strong cup of coffee. What would be my best option of the two of these? I'm possibly open to buying a moka pot but I have way too much coffee stuff as it is.

2. The Marscapone - Is it hard to make and/or worth it? I have a month to figure it out so I could experiment if people thought it was a worthwhile use of my time.

3. The ladyfingers - Most recipes I've read in book form or online say to just buy them---the single thing I've heard the most is that homemade ones are often less able to absorb the espresso. Am I better off just buying or is it worth it make them? And if I just buy them does anyone have any recommendations on brands?

Since I get weirdly nervous cooking for people I'm probably going to attempt it several times beforehand. Thanks to anyone willing to give input.
 

BriareosGAF

Member
Oct 28, 2017
1,194
I had some pics from my wife's here. It is the best I've had, right up there with Pompi in Rome.
What would be my best option of the two of these?
My wife declares: strong pot from freshly ground beans, as well as espresso powder mixed in with the liquor.
Is it hard to make and/or worth it?
To my knowledge we've never made mascarpone from scratch, nor anyone I know (sounds fun though). We whatever our local Italian grocer stocks (can't remember brand offhand), although my wife will also use Vermont Creamery occasionally.
Most recipes I've read in book form or online say to just buy them
Similar, we just use Roland Savoiardi iirc, bought from the aforementioned grocer.
 

Channel5News

Avenger
Oct 27, 2017
6,506
Los Angeles, CA
Latest puff pastry pizza was a big hit: caramelized onion and parsley butter baste topped with Camembert and mushroom Brie, roasted mushrooms, thinly-sliced garlic and shallots, and finished with fresh thyme. I wanted to keep it vegetarian, but with some added prosciutto it would have been perfect.


 

Ether_Snake

Member
Oct 29, 2017
5,502
Anyone had a ductless range hood? I am going to have difficulties adding a duct to mine because of stupid building code and an unused chimney blocking the way, so I am thinking of getting a ductless hood if it can be good enough. I want to be able to cook steaks and not have the house smell for days:(
 

whatsinaname

Member
Oct 25, 2017
6,792
Anyone had a ductless range hood? I am going to have difficulties adding a duct to mine because of stupid building code and an unused chimney blocking the way, so I am thinking of getting a ductless hood if it can be good enough. I want to be able to cook steaks and not have the house smell for days:(
Not good enough. I cook Indian and Chinese on the regular, I have to use a table top vent fan next to a window.
 

Ether_Snake

Member
Oct 29, 2017
5,502
Not good enough. I cook Indian and Chinese on the regular, I have to use a table top vent fan next to a window.
Damnit, another pain in the butt with this home. Don’t want to vent vertically out the roof. Another thing to figure out for the eventual kitchen renos. I have to get to the bottom of this code thing, bet the architects were lying when they said we can’t have a vent visible on the outside wall, makes no sense and other buildings have it.
 

Deception

Member
Nov 15, 2017
6,634
Does anyone have a good kimchi recipe? Going to stop at my local H-Mart this weekend and want to try to dabble into some Korean flavors and I know good kimchi is a must. Also, while i'm asking, what are some good brands of Gochujang and Fish oil?
 

Channel5News

Avenger
Oct 27, 2017
6,506
Los Angeles, CA
It's not very photogenic, but baking some puff pastry with a mustard base, duck rillettes and camembert is a winning combination. 👌 (no fresh thyme on hand)

Does anyone have a good kimchi recipe? Going to stop at my local H-Mart this weekend and want to try to dabble into some Korean flavors and I know good kimchi is a must. Also, while i'm asking, what are some good brands of Gochujang and Fish oil?

I just had a bowl this morning. What I'll do is buy a three-pound container of kimchi, make a ton of this fried rice, and freeze it all for later. (I make this without any meat, though next time I'll start using my homemade chicken stock for the rice.)

The trick is to squeeze out all the kimchi juice for the sauce, and then stir-fry and caramelize the kimchi before folding in the rice and sauce. You get the best of both worlds: deeper umami flavors from cooking out the kimchi, and the sourness of the reincorporated kimchi brine.
 

DEspite

Alt account
Banned
Jul 30, 2019
80
I'm still pretty new to cooking but I've learned how to sautee onions at least, so with stuff kitbashed from stuff in my apartment i present Mac&Tuna with turmenic powder:


Recipe:
Ingredients


For the sauce:

For the macaroni:
  • 50 gram of macaroni
  • 400ml of water

Instructions
Prepare the macaroni:

In a pot, put 50 gram of macaroni and pour 400 ml of water on it, then boil until the macaroni becomes soft.

Prepare the sauce:
  1. Heat a pan on a small fire.
  2. While the pan is heating up, chop the three white onion chunks into small pieces
  3. After you're done chopping the onions, put 1 teaspoon of margarine onto the now warm pan and spread it until it fully melts all over the pan
  4. Switch into a medium sized fire and then drop the onion onto the pan, and fry (aka sautee) it until you can smell its niceness
  5. After the onion is sauteed, put 2 tablespoons of canned tuna onto the pan and stir it on the pan for 30 seconds to let it warm up
  6. Then pour 1 pack of instant turmenic powder, 200ml of You-C 1000 orange water, 100ml of water, and 50ml of HP brown sauce (in that order), then stir on a medium flame for 5 minutes.
Bringing it all around:
  1. Switch to a small flame, and then pour the macaroni onto the pan.
  2. Stir it for 30 seconds to let the macaroni absorb the sauce better, and then cover the pan with cover and wait 3 minutes.



To serve
Turn off the stove, and then pour it onto a plate. Or just eat it from the pan!
TBH it looks butt ugly tho and will turn people off from eating it like that time the judges in Masterchef refused to eat a contestant's meal bc it looked ugly, do you guys have any tips on how to present pasta better?
 

Hasseigaku

Member
Oct 30, 2017
1,513
Off the top of my head:

Herbs always make things look better if you have access to them
Maybe a shallower, wider bowl so you can see it better.
 
Oct 25, 2017
2,911
Hey Iron Era: horrible confession, I've been eating McDonalds for breakfast way too much. I know how to cook basically every kind of egg but I never have the time/will power to do it so I'm thinking of trying some breakfast themed meal prep to make it easier and not quite sure what to do. So far on my list of ideas is cold milk-based oats in a jar with fruit in it (or however that works). Would love some other suggestions about what people do for breakfast before work. Help me curb my addiction to eating McGriddles while driving to work!
 

BriareosGAF

Member
Oct 28, 2017
1,194
You can make various fritata/quiche ahead of time and then reheat them on the way out the door or at the office. We have maybe four or five different ones we make, my favorite is probably a poblano, potato, cheese and egg. Also leftover spaghetti with eggs in a frittata, throw some capers and olives in, some minced parsley, great for a morning reheat, too.

Quick breakfast sandwich: mixed mayonaise and gochuchang on a toasted english muffin with a fried egg and a thin slice of cheddar, little arugula if you have it.
 
Nov 23, 2017
358
I made butter. So Emma on youtube made butter in an old jar churn, and it looked amazing. So I did a search for stand mixer butter and watched a few videos. It’s way messier in an open bowl, but I’m so happy with the results. I never realized how easy it was to do, but probably not very cost effective.
 

Deception

Member
Nov 15, 2017
6,634
I found this amazing cut of pichana steak at my local grocery store and decided to go all out and make it Brazillian style with chimichurri, white rice and fried potatoes.



I scored the fat cap on the meat and seared it for about 5-10 mins on low heat and let the fat render really nicely and then I got a quick sear on each side and then placed it in the oven at 400F for about 20 mins with the fat cap facing up until it hit 135F. The fat was rendered beautifully although, I did overcook the steak to medium-well but it was still amazing and I would definitely cook that cut again. I've never been able to get fat that flavorful and have it melt in my mouth without having some chewy parts.

As for the chimichurri, I went simple and use 1 bunch of chopped cilantro, 2/3 cup of red wine vinegar, 1 and 1/3 cup of olive oil, two minced garlic cloves, 1/2 diced jalapeno, 1/2 cup of oregano, 1 teaspoon of cumin and salt and pepper to taste. Absolutely amazing and really helped brighten up the dish thanks to that bite from the RWV.

Since i've moved to my own house i've really stepped up my cooking game and have been actually losing weight since i've been using higher quality ingredients and relying less on meat to make the dish and put more of a showcase of veggies. This dish was the first time i've cooked red meat in 2 months and it was definitely worth it.
 

BriareosGAF

Member
Oct 28, 2017
1,194
Since i've moved to my own house i've really stepped up my cooking game and have been actually losing weight since i've been using higher quality ingredients and relying less on meat to make the dish and put more of a showcase of veggies.
Congrats! I never lived in dorms in university and that really forced me to up my cooking game as I was responsible for all of my own meals. (And I was poor.)
anyone have go-to tempeh recipes (to use it, not make it)
Because it can be a little dry/mealy we usually go for it being immersed in a curry. Any of your favorite massamun/yellow/green/etc. can be used that way, it's just a protein substitution at that point, although we used to get tempeh curry at an Indonesian place in Cheviot Hills back when I lived in west LA, so we like to look for Indonesian curry setups.
 

Deception

Member
Nov 15, 2017
6,634
Congrats! I never lived in dorms in university and that really forced me to up my cooking game as I was responsible for all of my own meals. (And I was poor.)
Thanks! I've been cooking for myself since a kid (single mom and all) but there's a huge difference since back at my mom's house I would cook for 5 people but now I am only cooking for myself and my girlfriend. So cost, quantity, and quality have all been affected but in a positive way. Not to mention, I now have all of my own kitchen tools so i've been trying to make a bit more advanced dishes and been mostly successful.
 

BriareosGAF

Member
Oct 28, 2017
1,194
Thanks! I've been cooking for myself since a kid (single mom and all) but there's a huge difference since back at my mom's house I would cook for 5 people but now I am only cooking for myself and my girlfriend. So cost, quantity, and quality have all been affected but in a positive way. Not to mention, I now have all of my own kitchen tools so i've been trying to make a bit more advanced dishes and been mostly successful.
Ah yeah, bunch of different dimensions to the cooking journey. Better ingredients, weirder techniques, different regional/ethnic, etc. I was telling my kids the other day how I used to make my own rice milk all the time because we were too poor in university to afford commercial. Cook up a batch of rice, add water, lecithin to emulsify, blend away, and then try not to grimace when you eat it on your off-brand cereal :P.
 

cosmickosm

Member
Oct 26, 2017
1,139
What a random find, I've been wondering why there wasn't a cooking OT, yet here we are!

Over the past year I've started to cook more often, beyond basic easy stuff during the week. And over the last 2 months I've started to get very interested in stepping up my game. Looking for some recommendations on cookware and knives.

I have an enameled dutch oven and a cast iron skillet. We have 1-2 other non-stick pans Ikea pans that I'll use when we need to whip up something quick during the work week. Is it worth upgrading those to a stainless steel pan? And what are some decently priced (under $100) knives? I've been using some knife from a set my wife got as a graduation gift years back. Wouldn't mind having a couple knives of a decent quality.
 

BriareosGAF

Member
Oct 28, 2017
1,194
Is it worth upgrading those to a stainless steel pan?
If you don't like restrictions on tools when cooking due to a coating, sure. If you worry about non-stick coatings contaminating your food, maybe. If you prefer the aesthetics of stainless, possibly. But beyond that it's just about whether you're able to cook the meals you want to eat with the equipment you have, or not. I have five stainless saute pans of varying sizes because I want to be able to cook sausage in one, eggs in another, have some mushrooms sauteeing in this other one, etc., but not everybody needs that of course.
And what are some decently priced (under $100) knives?
As a boring neo-yuppie I basically stick to Wusthof classics, and the santoku is my current favorite knife. We cut a lot of vegetables. The 4188-7 is $85, the 4183 is a bit more at $130, which is the one I have (actually have two so I don't have to fight with my wife for it when we're both doing prep).
 

lootenplunder

Member
Oct 26, 2017
64
For pans, I have been cooking almost exclusively with carbon steel for a few years and love it. You get nice hit distribution, nice heat retention, and a durable non stick surface after seasoning. It's a great balance. Even the nice pans aren't very expensive (matfer and de buyer pans run $40-$60). I'd recommend a 12", a 10" is great for single dishes but can get crowded.

For knives, I've found victorinox provides a great value. You can get started with the necessities (8" chef, paring, and a bread knife) for less than $100. Something like this.

Basically anything in a big set (knives or pans) are going to skimp on quality and go for quantity to make up for it. You'll find even set pans from the same manufacturer are smaller and made of cheaper material than individual items. Your best bet is to get the basics to get started as individual peaces and keep an eye out for deals as time goes on. I ended up getting a mercer brisket knife that I sharpened back to perfection for $1.50 at goodwill. I also scored an all clad 10" stainless saute pan for $10 at a thrift store while traveling. Stuff like that.
 

cosmickosm

Member
Oct 26, 2017
1,139
If you don't like restrictions on tools when cooking due to a coating, sure. If you worry about non-stick coatings contaminating your food, maybe. If you prefer the aesthetics of stainless, possibly. But beyond that it's just about whether you're able to cook the meals you want to eat with the equipment you have, or not. I have five stainless saute pans of varying sizes because I want to be able to cook sausage in one, eggs in another, have some mushrooms sauteeing in this other one, etc., but not everybody needs that of course.

As a boring neo-yuppie I basically stick to Wusthof classics, and the santoku is my current favorite knife. We cut a lot of vegetables. The 4188-7 is $85, the 4183 is a bit more at $130, which is the one I have (actually have two so I don't have to fight with my wife for it when we're both doing prep).
For pans, I have been cooking almost exclusively with carbon steel for a few years and love it. You get nice hit distribution, nice heat retention, and a durable non stick surface after seasoning. It's a great balance. Even the nice pans aren't very expensive (matfer and de buyer pans run $40-$60). I'd recommend a 12", a 10" is great for single dishes but can get crowded.

For knives, I've found victorinox provides a great value. You can get started with the necessities (8" chef, paring, and a bread knife) for less than $100. Something like this.

Basically anything in a big set (knives or pans) are going to skimp on quality and go for quantity to make up for it. You'll find even set pans from the same manufacturer are smaller and made of cheaper material than individual items. Your best bet is to get the basics to get started as individual peaces and keep an eye out for deals as time goes on. I ended up getting a mercer brisket knife that I sharpened back to perfection for $1.50 at goodwill. I also scored an all clad 10" stainless saute pan for $10 at a thrift store while traveling. Stuff like that.
Thanks for the replies! I think I'll hold off on the stainless steel pan for now, maybe request it as an xmas gift. I'll look into the Wusthoff and Victorinox knives and see which ones to go with. For sure I'm buying 2, a chef's nice and a paring/utility knife. I think the bread knife can wait as the one we currently off is surprisingly decent.
 

ty_hot

Member
Dec 14, 2017
4,038
left the kitchen for a few minutes and burnt my soy glaze. no idea what to do with my pork ribs anymore.

thanks! My wife also doesn't like mole, what's up with that.
if Im not mistaken I tried it once and felt like I was eating soil. lol

seemed like something that you need to eat a few times to “get used to”.
 

Chitown B

Member
Nov 15, 2017
4,894
left the kitchen for a few minutes and burnt my soy glaze. no idea what to do with my pork ribs anymore.


if Im not mistaken I tried it once and felt like I was eating soil. lol

seemed like something that you need to eat a few times to “get used to”.
you had some bad mole. it should taste like a rich brown umami sauce with hints of chocolate.
 

ty_hot

Member
Dec 14, 2017
4,038
you had some bad mole. it should taste like a rich brown umami sauce with hints of chocolate.
Could be a ba done, even though I love everything else that I had in that same restaurant. I remember the chocolate hints but there was just too much earthiness involved for me. Will try it again but where I live now there arent many foreign restaurants :( I miss Barcelona.
 
Nov 23, 2017
358
I got this great little set of two paring knives from William Sonoma, Wusthof brand. It was about $20. Tiny little things compared to some of my others, but amazing for small things like removing bad spots on vegatables, or peeling stuff.

 
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whatsinaname

Member
Oct 25, 2017
6,792
I'm looking for a good meat thermometer for the pops for christmas. He knows his way around a kitchen so it's not a problem if it's a bit on the pricey end.
Sorry, had meant to reply sooner but forgot!

Are you looking for an instant read thermometer? Or one that can be left in the meat on the grill or in the oven?

For instant read - Thermapen Mk4 is usually reviewed to be the best but is expensive at ~$100. I use a Lavatools Javelin Pro. Retails about $50 and does everything I ask of it.


I haven't looked into the probe/clip-on ones but ATK has a video for that too.