I've met more than 10 cases where women left their partners because they were addicted to League of Legends.

MilesQ

Member
Oct 25, 2017
5,432
I mean, addiction is a real thing. Some are addicted to games, some alcohol, some drugs. Why is it a surprise?
 

jcs

Member
Aug 7, 2018
1,949
All online games with long matches have this problem. Not only are online games addicting, it's not like it's COD where the matches can be ~15 mins max.
 

ArjanN

Member
Oct 25, 2017
4,031
I don't know many people that play LoL personally, might be region/age based, but WoW was definitely that type of addiction for tons of people.
 
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Oct 25, 2017
5,976
O-H-I-O
I was friends with a couple of people that lost their SO's because they played Everquest too much, one also for WoW so this doesn't surprise me although I know nothing of LoL. I play WoW quite a bit but I am not going to ignore my family for it, and if my wife called me right now and said delete that shit, it would be gone.
 

Bit_Reactor

Member
Apr 9, 2019
2,338
I mean, addiction is a real thing. Some are addicted to games, some alcohol, some drugs. Why is it a surprise?
^ this yeah. It's weird to me and maybe because it's a game forum specifically, but there are so many vices and addictions in the world that it seems odd that gaming is seen as such a black sheep compared to a lot of others I've experienced that are still seen as "okay."

Like I remember my father being a huge dick about my gametime when I was a kid while he'd sit on his ass drinking watching every Nascar special or spend many a 4am freezing his ass off just for a chance to shoot at a deer in the middle of nowhere.

To act like gaming addiction A.) doesn't exist or B.) Is something to be made a big deal out of is interesting. On one hand people could be "raising awareness" but most of the times it's to demonize and/or insult people who have a hobby that in the grand scheme of things is usually less destructive than some others. Exceptions to every generality and all that aside, I agree that it's no surprise that some people would have issues with gaming addiction.

But I'm also the guy who thinks "playing games a lot" isn't addiction and I find it hilarious that most of the time people are okay with alcoholism, sports fanatics, etc but draw the line at "he plays too many games with his friends." lol
 

hephaestus

Member
Oct 28, 2017
450
If governments are putting regulations on loot boxes because of addictive destructive effects on people. Should the government also regulate amount of gaming time? Arent both things just as damaging to people?
 

Flousn

Member
Jan 16, 2018
1,250
I already feel bad when I play 3 hours of battlefield under the week....
Personally, I don't know anybody that really struggled in their private life due to gaming though, although a friend of mine got close sometimes.
 

monketron

Member
Oct 27, 2017
666
These games are designed to feed into the same mechanisms that drive gambling addictions, so it's no surprise that it hooks people. Before LOL it was World of Warcraft that trod a very similar path. I spent a good decade in that game, luckily for me I told myself I wouldn't install it until I had finished my university exams. Close call!
 

Garrett 2U

Avenger
Oct 25, 2017
2,404
My girlfriend goes through periods where she plays a lot of League, 3-4 hours a day. She doesn’t drop her responsibilities for it, though, she works full time and goes to school.

We used to play together, but I generally quit playing because the community was too toxic. During these couple week periods, I just spend more time doing my own personal hobbies.

It isn’t an issue for us, but I can see how it could be.
 

Wispmetas

The Fallen
Oct 27, 2017
2,838
Yeah I had one friend that literally skipped his first batch of uni exams just so he could reach Gold before the season ended...
He ended up failing a ton of courses that year.
 

Dreavus

The Fallen
Jan 12, 2018
453
Never heard of it breaking people up but i believe it. In my circles, Dota 2 is spoken about in the past tense and we all pretty much agree the game is very good but the time commitment is way too high. The game is also “stressful” to play well and you kinda have to “come down” after playing, which really makes it tough to fit into a late evening play session. I imagine LOL is very similar.

I have a friend who is still all in (thousands of hours), but their SO puts up with it as far as I can tell.
 
Nov 17, 2017
7,954
I wouldn't say it's LoL related (Though it pops up a lot because it's so popular). But I think any online MP can fall into the route of "Just one more" and "I can't quit this match". I only ever played LoL back in the day, but I would guess the match length plays a part in things as well though. As other MP fare is typically shorter and to the point unless that has changed.
I think it gets its claws into you more when you become part of group of players. Then there's peer pressure added. You feel pressure to play when your friends are playing and you don't feel like you can exit out mid match. There's definitely been times where I told myself I was going to be productive on a specific night but get a message from my friends that they're on Overwatch. I've stayed up later than I should on some week nights playing due to that.

Overwatch luckily has short games compared to LoL but it still has this way of making you want to play one more until one becomes ten. The only game I played for a bit that had matches up to an hour was Paragon lol. Why did I play that? My friends were playing it. I didn't even like the game but I was still up at like 1AM finishing a game up.
 

BennyWhatever

Member
Oct 27, 2017
1,955
US
Back in 2011-2013, I was pretty damn addicted to League. My girlfriend at the time (now wife) was definitely not happy with how much I played the game. It has a culture of, when you're in a game (which can last up to 60 minutes, sometimes longer), you're fully committed to that game. So if your SO needs help with something it's "wait til this game is over please." And then when it was over, you quickly did the thing that needed done, then it was right back in. That's not good.
Luckily I finally got unaddicted. I think it was just a mix of burnout with the game, a new game coming along elsewhere (monster hunter probably), and my wife expressing her dislike for that game. I only play it maybe one night a month now.
 

Dreams-Visions

The Fallen
Oct 25, 2017
17,820
Miami, FL
I think it gets its claws into you more when you become part of group of players. Then there's peer pressure added. You feel pressure to play when your friends are playing and you don't feel like you can exit out mid match.
I don't think that's the issue here. Most League players are solo players.

People are competitive and they like the feeling that comes with winning. Games like League and Dota 2 are more rewarding than most games when it comes to the feeling of wins and losses because the matches are so long and require so much effort. Nobody wants to exit out of a match unless they're sure losses because you're investing time, talent, and rank into it. Further, there are rank tiers that unlock exclusive rewards to further show your skill level.

Winning (or the prospect therein) is the driver of time spent, along with the games being technically sound and reasonably balanced. And as that old saying goes, "time flies when you're having fun", a few matches of League or Dota can set you back 3-4 hours without even really noticing if you're not watching the clock. They're like playing multiple Monopoly or Chess matches in rapid succession. 15 minutes in League or Dota = the match has barely started. Couple that with people perhaps not feeling empowered at home or at work and you get lost jobs and broken marriages.
 
Nov 17, 2017
7,954
I don't think that's the issue here. Most League players are solo players.

People are competitive and they like the feeling that comes with winning. Games like League and Dota 2 are more rewarding than most games when it comes to the feeling of wins and losses because the matches are so long and require so much effort. Nobody wants to exit out of a match unless they're sure losses because you're investing time, talent, and rank into it. Further, there are rank tiers that unlock exclusive rewards to further show your skill level.

Winning (or the prospect therein) is the driver of time spent, along with the games being technically sound and reasonably balanced. And as that old saying goes, "time flies when you're having fun", a few matches of League or Dota can set you back 3-4 hours without even really noticing if you're not watching the clock. They're like playing multiple Monopoly or Chess matches in rapid succession. 15 minutes in League or Dota = the match has barely started. Couple that with people perhaps not feeling empowered at home or at work and you get lost jobs and broken marriages.
Ah, see I never played league so I wasn't aware of that. Still, I do think if you're part of a "team" playing these games it's definitely an additional factor making it harder to let go.
 

Dreams-Visions

The Fallen
Oct 25, 2017
17,820
Miami, FL
Ah, see I never played league so I wasn't aware of that. Still, I do think if you're part of a "team" playing these games it's definitely an additional factor making it harder to let go.
If you have a friend or two that play regularly, sure. Partying up gives you more to look forward when playing, more confidence that your team will win, and an additional social outlet/sphere to enjoy. But that's true of literally any game. What game isn't better and more playable with friends? It's not any more or less different in a MOBA other than the commitment in any given match is longer.
 

Jiminy

Avenger
Mar 29, 2018
3,600
Ive seen it for several games.
I myself have dealt with depression and social anxiety and almost fell into this trap myself before waking up and bettering my life by pulling a complete 180 for 2 years of my life.
I quit gaming-commited to running and weightlifting.
And now these days i know how to manage my priorities and social commitments better.
It's amazing what 6-24 months of concerted effort can do for your life. Good on you for doing this.

Lots of other people could benefit from that mindset. Set a goal for the next year, and fucking go for it, addictions/roadblocks be damned.
 
Nov 17, 2017
7,954
If you have a friend or two that play regularly, sure. Partying up gives you more to look forward when playing, more confidence that your team will win, and an additional social outlet/sphere to enjoy. But that's true of literally any game. What game isn't better and more playable with friends? It's not any more or less different in a MOBA other than the commitment in any given match is longer.
I guess my logic there was that with a team, there's added social pressures to getting on to play. Not that the problem is friends but that it amplifies the issue. Like you said, nobody wants to exit out of a match because they've invested time, talent and rank into it but with the added social element, you'd also be letting down your teammates, pissing off the group you're in because now their time, talent and rank was wasted due to you.
 
Oct 31, 2017
2,442
It, like many other modern video games, is a psychological and sociological snare designed to rope people in and keep them hooked to the drip and singing its praises, to where it/they dominate people’s lives not unlike a cult/drug addiction/powerful addictions, more generally.

I’d type more, but I don’t have the time atm. So apologies for drive-by’ing!
 

inguef

The Fallen
Oct 28, 2017
13,545
Maybe only physically
We shouldn't victim blame when the products are designed to trigger addiction.

I'm sure Destiny 2 (and other GAAS-titles) have caused a lot of divorces as well.

The first question I have is how those people found a girlfriend to begin with...
What the fuck is this

I was friends with a couple of people that lost their SO's because they played Everquest too much, one also for WoW so this doesn't surprise me although I know nothing of LoL. I play WoW quite a bit but I am not going to ignore my family for it, and if my wife called me right now and said delete that shit, it would be gone.
You would delete your WOW characters? That's strong.
 

Dreams-Visions

The Fallen
Oct 25, 2017
17,820
Miami, FL
I guess my logic there was that with a team, there's added social pressures to getting on to play. Not that the problem is friends but that it amplifies the issue. Like you said, nobody wants to exit out of a match because they've invested time, talent and rank into it but with the added social element, you'd also be letting down your teammates, pissing off the group you're in because now their time, talent and rank was wasted due to you.
It's not more or less than any other game.

But again, the commitment to getting on and playing a MOBA is longer and requires more focus than just about any other game. But the social pressure isn't any more significant. If you're good or your friends are on they will invite you and if you want to play you play. If you have some shit to do, you have some shit to do.

If you know you don't have at least an hour that you can safely block off (because matches can last that long or even longer), people will be upset that you joined the group at all, as joining and having to leave early means wasting the time of 4-9 other people. People are happy to play without you or wait until you do have time to play. In my years of playing both League and Dota, I've never seen anyone pressured to play a match if they didn't want to play or have time to play.
 
Nov 17, 2017
7,954
It's not more or less than any other game.

But again, the commitment to getting on and playing a MOBA is longer and requires more focus than just about any other game. But the social pressure isn't any more significant. If you're good or your friends are on they will invite you and if you want to play you play. If you have some shit to do, you have some shit to do.

If you know you don't have at least an hour that you can safely block off (because matches can last that long or even longer), people will be upset that you joined the group at all, as joining and having to leave early means wasting the time of 4-9 other people. People are happy to play without you or wait until you do have time to play. In my years of playing both League and Dota, I've never seen anyone pressured to play a match if they didn't want to play or have time to play.
I’m talking about people who really get addicted to this, not your average player if that wasn’t clear.
 

LowParry

Member
Oct 26, 2017
2,430
I've heard and seen WoW raids break up families back then. It almost seemed common when you heard these stories from fellow guildies and other guilds alike. Vent is certainly a past time though.
 

Fuchsia

Member
Oct 28, 2017
4,057
I had a friend who got completely addicted to LOL. It became a huge problem. They had to take serious measures to eventually quit.
 

Blitz

Member
Oct 29, 2017
150
It can happen to any game. Not just games. It can be gambling, alcohol, drugs, etc.
I still play LoL occasionally.
 
OP
OP
The era of Luigi
Dec 4, 2017
4,926
Brazil
I just asked my English teacher if I've made a mistake in the title 😂😂
He said that their was referring to partners so that is that hahahaha but I will ask mods to change to (not saying that my English is perfect, it's far from it, I just found it very funny)
" I've met more than 10 cases where women broke up their relationships because their partners were addicted to league of legends"
That this happens isn't a surprise. What is surprising however is that OP knows 10 instances of it.
Yep
my doctoral advisor's husband told me that with 10 cases I could make a poster for a congress and have a good discussion about the subject.
I really appreciate the input you guys gave to me about this. Skins, looot boxes, long matchs, friends/teams, being very competitive, all this helps to make the game more addictive
 

justiceiro

Member
Oct 30, 2017
4,256
A cool reminder that videogames never need microtransaction to be addicitive in the first place.

Also guys, just this one time try to be mindful that judging people you don't know because of something posted in the internet is immature, if not downrigth ignorant. Lets all "grow up" not "only physically".
 

Imp the Dimp

Member
Oct 25, 2017
4,841
So true, it basically becomes an abusive cycle of stress and anger until you get a good game that pumps you up with all that dopamine for the addiction to continue. Shit is crazy.
Yeah. A good game of Dota 2 (and I presume LoL is no different) is something well, well beyond what any singleplayer game could ever provide for me if I'm being honest. Unless you've experienced it yourself, you would probably never understand. Which makes all the "Valve makes no games" threads all the more bizarre, because good Dota games aren't that rare, and virtually all of them are better and more intense than any singleplayer experience you will ever have. MOBAs are terrifyingly addictive.
 

jot

Member
Oct 25, 2017
917
It can happen to any game. Not just games. It can be gambling, alcohol, drugs, etc.
I still play LoL occasionally.
Yep. Behavioural addictions are totally a thing. When it comes to games (and a lot of the other behavioural addictions), I find people often aren’t looking at the underlying. Ok - so someone is addicted to gaming.. why? Trauma? Comorbid mental health issues (anxiety, depression)? Life stressors?
 
Jan 16, 2018
125
Hope's Peak Academy
I don't think that's the issue here. Most League players are solo players.

People are competitive and they like the feeling that comes with winning. Games like League and Dota 2 are more rewarding than most games when it comes to the feeling of wins and losses because the matches are so long and require so much effort. Nobody wants to exit out of a match unless they're sure losses because you're investing time, talent, and rank into it. Further, there are rank tiers that unlock exclusive rewards to further show your skill level.

Winning (or the prospect therein) is the driver of time spent, along with the games being technically sound and reasonably balanced. And as that old saying goes, "time flies when you're having fun", a few matches of League or Dota can set you back 3-4 hours without even really noticing if you're not watching the clock. They're like playing multiple Monopoly or Chess matches in rapid succession. 15 minutes in League or Dota = the match has barely started. Couple that with people perhaps not feeling empowered at home or at work and you get lost jobs and broken marriages.
I feel like another thing is that for me, it can be a sort of lose-lose when I finish a match.
  • If I win a match, I get happy and I have this sort of "high" that makes me want to play another match to win it.
  • If I lose a match, I don't like the prospect of my last match for the night being a lost and try to play another match to get a victory.
EDIT: I used to do this, I have not played a MOBA for a long while, so please don't be concerned for me. I am alright.
 
Last edited:
Oct 27, 2017
2,522
I feel like another thing is that for me, it can be a sort of lose-lose when I finish a match.
  • If I win a match, I get happy and I have this sort of "high" that makes me want to play another match to win it.
  • If I lose a match, I don't like the prospect of my last match for the night being a lost and try to play another match to get a victory.
*Many hours later*

You get up, feeling dizzy and looking at the clock, thinking damn, it is already tomorrow. I guess I will do the work tomorrow...
 

remz

Member
Oct 25, 2017
2,545
I feel like another thing is that for me, it can be a sort of lose-lose when I finish a match.
  • If I win a match, I get happy and I have this sort of "high" that makes me want to play another match to win it.
  • If I lose a match, I don't like the prospect of my last match for the night being a lost and try to play another match to get a victory.
If you acknowledge this it is probably time to stop playing at all.
 

Dreams-Visions

The Fallen
Oct 25, 2017
17,820
Miami, FL
I feel like another thing is that for me, it can be a sort of lose-lose when I finish a match.
  • If I win a match, I get happy and I have this sort of "high" that makes me want to play another match to win it.
  • If I lose a match, I don't like the prospect of my last match for the night being a lost and try to play another match to get a victory.
Begin to set limits on your play time and/or match count. "2 matches, no matter what happens." for example.

Your approach is how people wind up barefooted and broke in Las Vegas. "Just one more round". Just about everyone can identify with the feeling you're talking about and the mistake. NOBODY likes to go to bed on a loss. Especially in ranked play. But MOBA matches are just too long and you can be waiting for that "next win" for 5 hours. As you've probably found before. Further, fatigue can start affecting you and your decision making, communication, and reaction speeds and you won't even realize it. I strongly encourage you to start your play sessions with time or count match limits as the priority. Some days will be all L's. Some days will be all W's. But you will appreciate the control you feel over your lifetime. I promise.
 

LumberPanda

Member
Feb 3, 2019
480
If governments are putting regulations on loot boxes because of addictive destructive effects on people. Should the government also regulate amount of gaming time? Arent both things just as damaging to people?
Gambling (specifically casinos) is its own can of worms in regards to how it screws your life over. Lootboxes are just digital gambling, so it makes sense that they ideally should be regulated in the same way that casinos are (which changes based on country).

If they want to tackle gaming addiction, then they should apply those rules consistently to any other activity that people can spend too much time with. Netflix, YouTube, browsing Resetera, drinking, going hunting every weekend and ignoring your kids and wife, etc. And if they do decide to tackle all those, then they would have to have some way of monitoring across all hobbies, otherwise you could game the system by playing League for your allotted game time today and then marathon The Office again for the 32nd time.

That's pretty hard to regulate. And also incredibly scary. So no, the government should not monitor how you spend your time and decide what you can and can't do. It's easier (and far more ethical) to look at the companies and tell them to smarten up (fine them hard if they don't and remove their product from the market) instead of monitoring individuals. If companies are deciding to put out games known to be harmful and addictive, then those games should come with adequate warnings and information so that people can make educated decisions before taking the risk. Riot should be on the line and responsible for players that get addicted to their product. Riot should be on the line for funding gaming addiction rehab centers.
 

bananabread

Member
Oct 28, 2017
25
I've been through this, first with Team Fortress 2 through 2007-2010 and then with Dota2 from 2011-15.

In that gap between 2010-11 I lost 35kg, started studying and made lots of close friends. When dota2 took over I drifted away from my social circles, stopped sleeping properly and put on about 45kg, which I'm only just now losing again.

The worst part about the whole experience is that a lot of the time I wasn't even really enjoying what I was doing. I'd get angry, punch my desk when things went poorly, and hurl some pretty vitriolic shit at my teammates if they weren't performing up to my standards at the time. The highs of winning felt just good enough that I'd keep re-queuing just trying to get another 'hit', but I recognize now that I was displaying the same patterns of behavior as any other addict.

The biggest issue with the MOBA/MMO genres is that when you start a session, you're essentially locked in for a period of time. You're not supposed to leave a MOBA match after it starts so once you click that matchmaking button you're agreeing to give up an hour of your time. If things are going poorly and you're getting frustrated you're essentially trapped in that situation until it ends and ending the game requires the tacit permission of your team of strangers (in games with a forfeit function), or the enemy team of strangers (in games without one) who can delay the game and drag things out while leaving you essentially zero chance of turning things around. Once you've started playing, your sense of control over that hour of your life is greatly diminished, and it can be the most upsetting experience in the world.

These days I scratch my competitive gaming itch with Rocket League, since games are 5 minutes long and if you're not playing ranked you can just drop out at any time with zero penalty.
 

Imp the Dimp

Member
Oct 25, 2017
4,841
I've been through this, first with Team Fortress 2 through 2007-2010 and then with Dota2 from 2011-15.

In that gap between 2010-11 I lost 35kg, started studying and made lots of close friends. When dota2 took over I drifted away from my social circles, stopped sleeping properly and put on about 45kg, which I'm only just now losing again.

The worst part about the whole experience is that a lot of the time I wasn't even really enjoying what I was doing. I'd get angry, punch my desk when things went poorly, and hurl some pretty vitriolic shit at my teammates if they weren't performing up to my standards at the time. The highs of winning felt just good enough that I'd keep re-queuing just trying to get another 'hit', but I recognize now that I was displaying the same patterns of behavior as any other addict.

The biggest issue with the MOBA/MMO genres is that when you start a session, you're essentially locked in for a period of time. You're not supposed to leave a MOBA match after it starts so once you click that matchmaking button you're agreeing to give up an hour of your time. If things are going poorly and you're getting frustrated you're essentially trapped in that situation until it ends and ending the game requires the tacit permission of your team of strangers (in games with a forfeit function), or the enemy team of strangers (in games without one) who can delay the game and drag things out while leaving you essentially zero chance of turning things around. Once you've started playing, your sense of control over that hour of your life is greatly diminished, and it can be the most upsetting experience in the world.

These days I scratch my competitive gaming itch with Rocket League, since games are 5 minutes long and if you're not playing ranked you can just drop out at any time with zero penalty.
Excellent post