Keanu Reeves Hover Hand

Etrian Oddity

Member
Oct 26, 2017
2,544
What if someone doesn't like to be touched though? Does taking a picture with someone automatically mean you're okay with them touching you? I don't think it has to.
Are they getting into your personal space first and physically contacting you? I think if that's the case, the implication is being okay with it. Just wanting a picture and standing next to them? Yeah, I agree with you.
 

TheClaw7667

Member
Oct 25, 2017
499
The difference of treatment of hover hand in the case of Keanu compared to the cases of nerds 10 years ago is because not the same dynamics are at play in both cases. Nerdy hover hands from 10 years ago were majorly made by men who wanted to pretend they were close to a girl, generally cute one fitting social standards of beauty, without being rejected by her nor asking for her consent, in order to brag about it later on.
Keanu on the other hand, is a sex symbol and has been since like the start of his career, and he knows this very well and has developed techniques around that in order to be able to live his life relatively normally. His hover hand is his way of protecting himself, his privacy, of setting boundaries with his fans. He has been a very private man, and still is, and that's his way of setting his personal space. He does that with every women regardless of their beauty fitting the social standard or not. He's very skilled at firmly blocking flirting attempts being made towards him, in a respectful manner, probably because he's had a lifetime of those coming his way and had to learn how to deal with them.

This interview really paints a good picture about it:

My understanding of hover hands was that nerds who lacked any confidence didn't feel comfortable touching women. They were considered so pathetic they couldn't even touch a woman during a photo at a fair/expo. I don't recall hover hands being some kind of photo trick to brag about taking a photo with models. 10 years ago people would be laughed at if they tried to brag about a hover hand photo.

This just seems like times have changed, and people are more aware of individuals personal space.
 

RedMercury

Member
Dec 24, 2017
7,081
Are they getting into your personal space first and physically contacting you? I think if that's the case, the implication is being okay with it. Just wanting a picture and standing next to them? Yeah, I agree with you.
Maybe, but they would be in the wrong for doing that without asking, if someone did that I might be like Keanu too and not want to reciprocate because I'd be like what are you doing
 

Bus-TEE

Member
Nov 20, 2017
1,774
I remember speaking to someone in the music business years and years ago who told me that all "his" boybands (in the selfie age) had strict instructions not to hug or kiss (on the cheek or whatever) any fans at public events just in case they tried to use it as evidence of a 'sexual relationship' later on.

I'm not saying that this is what's happening here but I do wonder what his management team might have 'advised' him to do in these situations.
 

Eidan

Avenger
Oct 30, 2017
2,443
What if someone doesn't like to be touched though? Does taking a picture with someone automatically mean you're okay with them touching you? I don't think it has to.
Then they can say so. And if you’re the type who is afraid every person who takes a picture with you doesn’t like to be touched, then just hold your hands in front of yourself or at your side. Hover handing is just ridiculous.
 

asmith906

Member
Oct 27, 2017
5,793
Then they can say so. And if you’re the type who is afraid every person who takes a picture with you doesn’t like to be touched, then just hold your hands in front of yourself or at your side. Hover handing is just ridiculous.
I mean it's not like he's doing it in a showy way. People only notice because it's been pointed out.
 

RedMercury

Member
Dec 24, 2017
7,081
Then they can say so. And if you’re the type who is afraid every person who takes a picture with you doesn’t like to be touched, then just hold your hands in front of yourself or at your side. Hover handing is just ridiculous.
So, a couple things. First, I don't think it should be on the person to say "I don't want to be touched" as if that s the default, I think the person who wants to touch should be the one to ask. Also, I wouldn't necessarily say it's out of "fear", it's moreso a consideration thing. Lastly I don't know what the difference would be between hover-handing and holding your hands out in front of you or at your side, who really cares where your hands are if you're not touching someone? The end result is the same.
 

Eidan

Avenger
Oct 30, 2017
2,443
So, a couple things. First, I don't think it should be on the person to say "I don't want to be touched" as if that s the default, I think the person who wants to touch should be the one to ask. Also, I wouldn't necessarily say it's out of "fear", it's moreso a consideration thing. Lastly I don't know what the difference would be between hover-handing and holding your hands out in front of you or at your side, who really cares where your hands are if you're not touching someone? The end result is the same.
If a person comes up to me and asks me if they can take a picture with me, if they have a problem with me touching their shoulder I’d expect them to tell me, but whatever. Your second point, fair enough.

As for your third point, I’d say the difference is that hover handing looks ridiculous, and the alternatives don’t.
 

sersteven

Member
Oct 25, 2017
536
Philadelphia
Heaven forbid someone takes a picture and does a friendly gesture without actually touching to let everyone feel comfortable. Yeah how "cringe".

Good on Keanu for taking the extra effort.
 

water_wendi

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,500
Funny how things change. If you remember, 10 years ago 'hoverhand' was a massive joke people pointed toward as a way to shame some men for being awkward around women. It was played off like they wanted to appear to have intimacy without wanting the woman to know or consent. Keanu is being praised for it, today.
i never really got that vibe. Just that these guys were too shy around women and losers. Its funny how fast things change though.
 

ishan

Member
Oct 27, 2017
2,007
Funny how things change. If you remember, 10 years ago 'hoverhand' was a massive joke people pointed toward as a way to shame some men for being awkward around women. It was played off like they wanted to appear to have intimacy without wanting the woman to know or consent. Keanu is being praised for it, today.
I mean it is awkwardish. In Keanuu's case however given how many ppl he has to take photos with it makes sense and helps avoid any controversy also etc. Im pretty sure with people he's friends with he behaves differently.

EDIT: Most comments arent about this not being awkward its about Keanu being extra careful with people he doesnt know. PEople who just want a photo etc. He's famous his example is not analogous to most people
 

msdstc

Member
Nov 6, 2017
1,137
Funny how things change. If you remember, 10 years ago 'hoverhand' was a massive joke people pointed toward as a way to shame some men for being awkward around women. It was played off like they wanted to appear to have intimacy without wanting the woman to know or consent. Keanu is being praised for it, today.
Wait people thought hover hand meant the person wanted intimacy? That's not what I get at all. It comes off to me like the person doesn't know where to put there hand and doesn't want to invade or violate someone by touching them. To be honest if I put my arm around someone I get concerned about where to put my hand. Some people don't like to be touched.
 

Kino

Member
Oct 25, 2017
953
Eh, I think the hover hand is way more awkward than simply standing next to the person with your arms behind your back or even just doing a cutesy hand gesture like a thumbs up or a wave.
 

Vermillion

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,945
The difference of treatment of hover hand in the case of Keanu compared to the cases of nerds 10 years ago is because not the same dynamics are at play in both cases. Nerdy hover hands from 10 years ago were majorly made by men who wanted to pretend they were close to a girl, generally cute one fitting social standards of beauty, without being rejected by her nor asking for her consent, in order to brag about it later on.
Keanu on the other hand, is a sex symbol and has been since like the start of his career, and he knows this very well and has developed techniques around that in order to be able to live his life relatively normally. His hover hand is his way of protecting himself, his privacy, of setting boundaries with his fans. He has been a very private man, and still is, and that's his way of setting his personal space. He does that with every women regardless of their beauty fitting the social standard or not. He's very skilled at firmly blocking flirting attempts being made towards him, in a respectful manner, probably because he's had a lifetime of those coming his way and had to learn how to deal with them.

This interview really paints a good picture about it:

Uh... the first part of your post is fully wrong.

The whole reason it was mocked was because it was seen as awkward. The same reasons nerds were mocked for being virgins.

Now, I can see you trying to shift said mockery to something more in line with attacking misogyny - like attacking self-proclaimed incels & nice guys today - but this was never those. There was nothing behind it besides, as ever, shaming people for not being confident.
 

Delphine

Member
Mar 30, 2018
595
France
Uh... the first part of your post is fully wrong.

The whole reason it was mocked was because it was seen as awkward. The same reasons nerds were mocked for being virgins.

Now, I can see you trying to shift said mockery to something more in line with attacking misogyny - like attacking self-proclaimed incels & nice guys today - but this was never those. There was nothing behind it besides, as ever, shaming people for not being confident.

Maybe there's a part of truth in your version, but I know for a fact there's a part of truth in mine. I have seen many dudes taking pictures with as many hot girls as possible in this exact particular way, only to buff their own self-esteem, signal social status, and be able to brag about it to their male peers afterwards. I've seen that happen in the cosplay community, for example.
 
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