• The ResetEra Games of the Year Awards 2018 results are now live! Congratulations to all the winners!
  • Sidebar and Width settings will now no longer reset after 4 hours of inactivity! We have implemented a new system that will remember these preferences on each browser, for both members and guests. This allows you to choose different settings on different devices if you so desire.

Kendrick Lamar calls out white fan for rapping n-word onstage with him at concert

Status
Not open for further replies.
Oct 25, 2017
838
User Banned (2 Days): Trolling in a thread pertaining to serious topics.
do rappers want white fans? let us know by how you write the song.
 
Oct 28, 2017
831
I was doing some Busta Rhymes at karaoke once. Realized it's very easy to substitute brotha for that word and then nobody gets upset. (Except Busta Rhymes because a goofy white guy turned his song into a karaoke talent show for wannabe choppers.)

Kendrick handled the situation incredibly well. Love that guy. Just correct her politely and move on.
 
do rappers want white fans? let us know by how you write the song.
???

Excuse my ignorance but I don't understand why anyone would want to use the word - I'm European caucasian from Vancouver Canada, and have never used that word personally and never heard it conversationally growing up, so I don't have context outside of US media, reading literature, and my time in the US (and only started traveling or living there in later in my 20s).

Can someone explain it to me and hopefully I don't get banned asking it? But why do black people in the US still use that word if they as a society don't want it? Doesn't it seem to be to be continuing to imbue it into the lexicon of your society when you want it removed from it? Especially for those ignorant to the historical significance. I understand systematic racism towards black people is still very strong in the US (and possibly even getting worse), but unless you are a victim of the systematic racism, then you aren't experiencing it first hand, it seems it may be hard for a lot of newer sheltered generations to learn the historical significance. So they don't get the historical significance but experience it from pop culture often - so it seems to create these kinds of situations.

I just don't understand the logic. Does it have something to do with trying to own a word and create your own cultural power on it to override the awful history of it? I just read the history on it and it never had a positive connotation and repurposed for a negative / derogatory connotation like some words to want to bring it back to the positive connotation. Because the logic of wanting to repurpose it and owning it makes sense but it seems to me to be less of a pro then the con of continuing to imbue it into the lexicon of US society to me. Is this where the difference is in thoughts because nobody using the word at all and only culture that experienced it using it?

I just don't think I see it in any other situation in the other cultures or subcultures I've experienced or lived in. I just always go by the philosophy of only using the words someone wants to be described with - and if you're not sure you ask - so you don't have these situations like you see with this girl. While that would seem obvious, I do see this not being applied by a lot of people still, especially with the newer dynamic of pronouns.

And that's probably the best example I can understand and why this doesn't make sense to me. Unless I know I always ask someone what pronoun they prefer to use the correct pronoun for their gender identification (as an example), and then I never see them use the pronoun they don't prefer but don't tell me to use the pronoun they just used - that would seem counter-productive to me.

Thoughts? Again hopefully not banned for trying to understand. Mods please understand the ignorance when you don't have US context.
Bro you're from fucking Vancouver, don't act like you just now heard about the n-word. Or does word from the street not reach you when you're living in Trump Tower or whatever?
 
Last edited:
Oct 28, 2017
255
Manila
Have anyone tried to skip words/lines in catchy songs (okay, I've never heard this song at all)? I find it difficult as fuck. When I am at work and starting singing along without noticing I sing stuff about murdering christians, praising Satan and stuff, and all the people sitting around me are the most religious people I ever met.

Always makes me feel a bit stupid. But damn, cant listen to songs like Ghost - Year Zero without singing out loud!
 
Oct 25, 2017
1,875
California
Damn, some of the responses in this thread are just terrible to downright embarrassing. How can you be that dense and not realize that shit don't fly?
Anyway, the situation was handled pretty well and she apologized. It's not like K-Dot pushed her offstage or something.
 
Have anyone tried to skip words/lines in catchy songs (okay, I've never heard this song at all)? I find it difficult as fuck. When I am at work and starting singing along without noticing I sing stuff about murdering christians, praising Satan and stuff, and all the people sitting around me are the most religious people I ever met.

Always makes me feel a bit stupid. But damn, cant listen to songs like Ghost - Year Zero without singing out loud!
Think the scenarios aren't analogous.

BELIAL. BEHEMOTH. BEELZEBUB. Has a nice rule of threes to it.

The N-word is just a single word that can be substituted. The song loses none of the catch by dropping it.
 
Oct 28, 2017
5,765
I don’t say the word that much, even when I’m rapping along. When Lupe Fiasco came out with The Coolest, I skipped the word every time it came up. It’s not that hard to not say it.
 
Oct 27, 2017
1,234
I do not agree with this at all, if I am understanding the story correctly. So he is on stage, singing one of his own songs, which uses the n-word in its lyrics. He brings a fan onstage to sing with him, but does not want her to sing parts of his own song. Sounds ridiculous to be honest. I think she handled it the right way, but I don't think he did.

If a word is so bad that we are suppose to use an abbreviated version of it, by saying "n-word" or not use it at all, then maybe it is time we stop using it as a collective whole. I get the idea, that non-blacks shouldn't use the word in conversation but halting something from your own song is going overboard.
 

BeeKaine

Banned
Member
Apr 21, 2018
736
Am a little because that's not how you get a charge for inciting hatred in the UK. Still, we should serious consider the idea of punitive damages for using racial slurs - perhaps as a tort rather than criminal.
And watch it immediately fucking collapse when it's used against the people it's supposed to protect.
 
Oct 29, 2017
1,154
I completely get people not wanting non blacks to use that word in speech etc. But in a song, I feel that iffy. Ppl write wrongs )with lyrics which can be completely out of control (I'm not talking about a specifc word etc , just songs in general . eg pumped up kicks is about shooting ppl does that mean no one should sing pumped up kicks etc).

Anyway the siutation is avoided by not having her on stage.
The it’s in the song argument is simply an excuse to try and recontextualize something and make a scenario where it’s ok to do that’s not ok. It’s not that hard to not say it or am I wrong? Is it difficult to not say the word if you’re white?
 
Oct 26, 2017
823
Some context for this post:
-I am a white man who tries to be conscious of social justice issues
-As far as I know I've never heard a Kendrick Lamar song in my life
-Growing up in the late 90s I enjoyed some rap songs but generally I'm not a rap fan

So just to get it out of the way, I don't think non-black people should ever say the N word, and I will leave the question of whether black people should say it up to them. It's not my place.

Have you ever tried to sing or rap a song and omit a word? It's not easy. The faster the lyrics flow, the harder it is. You can be actively trying to avoid saying a word and still have it slip out by accident because of the way our brains work.

A lot of you are saying it's really easy not to say the N word no matter the context, but when you are singing or rapping along with a song it's actually really difficult.

Because of this, after repeatedly trying and finding that I am not able to properly censor myself, a long time ago I swore off singing along with any song that has an N word in the lyrics. But for some people this isn't a realistic choice.

This woman was called up onstage in front of thousands of people. I am sure she was sweating and kind of petrified and out of her mind. If it's difficult to omit a word from a song when you're alone in your car, I imagine that it's just flat out impossible to do it in such a crazy situation.

I think Kendrick Lamar knew this. And now after calling this woman out, he ruined her evening and potentially her life, depending on how this whole thing shakes out. This was a really shitty thing to do to her and I feel bad for her.
 
Oct 28, 2017
1,937
User Banned (3 Days): Using straw man tactics and false equivalencies to justify the use of a racial prejorative
Want to know what's actually crazy? Centuries of oppression against black folks. Your opinion on this topic is irrelevant. If you ain't black, don't say it.
Why did you took such defensive position? I'm attacking no one.

Here the speaker's skin color matters BECAUSE THE WORD ITSELF HAS RACIAL CONNOTATIONS. A knife in a cook and a murderer's hands convey different things. The N-word is similar. Regardless of intent, a white person saying it digs up memories of slavery and racism that's been plaguing black people for centuries.

Most other words we use don't have similar connotations because they aren't words that were MADE FOR THE PURPOSE OF DISPARAGING AN IDENTITY.
So in the end, the context doesn't matter? So is de facto racist if other that black say it. Like if someone reads lyrics with the word nigga and reads it without censor himself, it's on the same page with someone who is pro-slavery, thinks black people are subhuman etc?
 
Oct 27, 2017
7,654
I don't get it. Kendrick Lamar doesn't need to show people he's "woke" regarding that word.

He told her proper etiquette, she appologized, she got to finish the song. Everyone was friendly and his opinion on the matter goes viral. I think it's pretty obvious what he gets out of it. The outrage from some is super weird.
Hmm.....your right he doesn't need more "woke" points...but call me crazy but I feel like he may have done this to revise his past of letting white people say the n-word in the past at his concerts. Just think it's weird.
 
Oct 27, 2017
1,738
Bro you're from fucking Vancouver, don't act like you just now heard about the n-word. Or does word from the street not reach you when you're living in Trump Tower or whatever?
I never heard it growing up conversationally. Of course I heard it third party but never conversationally with people. And honestly, I don't think I've heard it from someone in Vancouver even third party in 10 years. Just from media and when I was in other countries.

I heard racism towards Indians growing up in Surrey and First Nations growing up in Squamish before that unfortunately. But those situations never had a similar word situation.
 

BeeKaine

Banned
Member
Apr 21, 2018
736
How do you see that happening?
If you truly believe a word is damaging enough that it should be illegal just to mutter it, you don't think it won't be used negatively against black people?

Every fucking person here is going "only black people should say it" but you don't think that making a word some type of crime--again, just for saying it--would not ever backfire?

I really don't understand those who think minorities are so oppressed that the law should be designed to protect them. The laws that are enforced and instated by the people who want to oppress minorities.
 
If you truly believe a word is damaging enough that it should be illegal just to mutter it, you don't think it won't be used negatively against black people?

Every fucking person here is going "only black people should say it" but you don't think that making a word some type of crime--again, just for saying it--would not ever backfire?

I really don't understand those who think minorities are so oppressed that the law should be designed to protect them. The laws that are enforced and instated by the people who want to oppress minorities.
A tort isn't a crime. It's a civil wrong which can lead to compensation. It's actioned by private citizens, not the state.
 
Oct 25, 2017
1,875
California
So in the end, the context doesn't matter? So is de facto racist if other that black say it. Like if someone reads lyrics with the word nigga and reads it without censor himself, it's on the same page with someone who is pro-slavery, thinks black people are subhuman etc?
You can't be serious right? I don't understand how it's so difficult to understand. It's just the whole why can't I use it if they use it all the time thing.
 
Mar 23, 2018
3
Australia
She should have lectured him when he said bitch.
This needs an answer
I would actually love to see this as a separate thread. I don't think it should necessarily be discussed in this context, as I don't think it should take away from the issue at hand... it's not like because he says bitch that she can use the nword... but yeah, would love some commentary on the popular use of the word "bitch" and its consequences.
 

BeeKaine

Banned
Member
Apr 21, 2018
736
A tort isn't a crime. It's a civil wrong which can lead to compensation. It's actioned by private citizens, not the state.
A tort sounds like it has a lower barrier to offense and evidence than regular crime, which changes nothing about what I say, in fact with all the "you're the REAL racist for telling me not to say the n-word" it can easily be flipped back on you.

Bottom line, stop trying to make this a legal issue, it'll do fucking nothing or even worse for those who do not have that privilege.

The issue in question was resolved; just confront and show them how they done it wrong. Well, in this case, be a rich, popular rapper and shame them live across the country. If it's any more obvious or malicious, that's what hate crimes are for (and even those aren't perfect). We have a bunch of laws that will stop or at least confront the worst of these kinds of things.

But stop trying to make the word itself a punishable offense, practically it just won't work and least optimistically it'll make a snowball of much worse actions.
 
Oct 27, 2017
2,481
United Kingdom
User Banned (3 Days): Dictating the terms of language reclamation.
Seems ridiculous to me. It's in the song, she wasn't using it in any other context than repeating lyrics he already wrote.

You can't have a word that can only be used by certain skin colours.

I don't listen to much rap or hip hop but if the word is in the song, I'm gonna sing it. Freaky Friday is a recent example.
 
The police force and judicial system still being overly white?
Again. Tort is not a crime. No police unless they don't attend court. The judiciary is overly-white though, and that should be addressed.

To the thread as a whole, why are there so many rabid responses to a video that showed Kendrick handle it extremely well? A lot of this just sounds like "LET ME SAY IT, LET ME SAY IT" and it's really unfortunate.
 
Oct 30, 2017
582
How about using the German slang for Bro or close friend

'digga'

Worst case you also associate the songs with an Australian Machine Parts Manufacturer
 
Oct 25, 2017
4,644
True equality means being able to say nigger free of consequence.
I love these threads for showing which poster here ain't shit.
 
Oct 25, 2017
1,875
California
I would actually love to see this as a separate thread. I don't think it should necessarily be discussed in this context, as I don't think it should take away from the issue at hand... it's not like because he says bitch that she can use the nword... but yeah, would love some commentary on the popular use of the word "bitch" and its consequences.
Then make the thread?
 
Status
Not open for further replies.