La Liga app listened in on fans to catch bars illegally streaming soccer

Oct 25, 2017
3,894
Sweden
Christ, that’s heinous.

The Verge said:
Spain’s data protection agency has fined the country’s soccer league, LaLiga, €250,000 (about $280,000) for allegedly violating EU data privacy and transparency laws. The app, which is used for keeping track of games and stats, was using the phone’s microphone and GPS to track bars illegally streaming soccer games, Spanish newspaper El País reported.
 

Nacho

Member
Oct 25, 2017
3,017
NYC
Now bars should make an app to catch la liga illegally recording user activity and everything will be balanced.
 

Tapiozona

Avenger
Oct 28, 2017
556
Actually impressed and can't hate on this. I'm sure whoever installed the app didn't read any of the Terms of Service. It's a great idea.

At this point time anyone who doesn't expect apps, especially free ones, aren't tracking all of your shit, and reselling or profiting from it, is will full ignorant.

Edit: read the actual article and they clearly told users what they were doing. Even less sympathy. Ignorance and stupidity deserves no sympathy from me.

*. "Hey by doing this we're going to do that. Please understand this before you do this"

* <Does this>

* <Does that>

* "Whaaaaaaaa how dare you do that????
 

SirMossyBloke

Member
Oct 26, 2017
2,432
Actually impressed and can't hate on this. I'm sure whoever installed the app didn't read any of the Terms of Service. It's a great idea.

At this point time anyone who doesn't expect apps, especially free ones, aren't tracking all of your shit, and reselling or profiting from it, is will full ignorant.

Edit: read the actual article and they clearly told users what they were doing. Even less sympathy. Ignorance and stupidity deserves no sympathy from me.

*. "Hey by doing this we're going to do that. Please understand this before you do this"

* <Does this>

* <Does that>

* "Whaaaaaaaa how dare you do that????
I mean, yeah, fuck the privacy law, they put it in the small print.
 

BLEEN

Member
Oct 27, 2017
4,824
Lol how can you even prove that? Any single patron could've been streaming it on their phone. Sounds like a horrible plan.
 

Kenstar

Member
Oct 25, 2017
866
Earth
Lol how can you even prove that? Any single patron could've been streaming it on their phone. Sounds like a horrible plan.
once you got dozens of hits from a specific site it becomes more than cost effective to send an intern out there to confirm it vs random blind visits/anonymous tips and reports
 

Xharos

Member
Oct 25, 2017
3,488
Canary Islands, Spain
Actually impressed and can't hate on this. I'm sure whoever installed the app didn't read any of the Terms of Service. It's a great idea.

At this point time anyone who doesn't expect apps, especially free ones, aren't tracking all of your shit, and reselling or profiting from it, is will full ignorant.

Edit: read the actual article and they clearly told users what they were doing. Even less sympathy. Ignorance and stupidity deserves no sympathy from me.

*. "Hey by doing this we're going to do that. Please understand this before you do this"

* <Does this>

* <Does that>

* "Whaaaaaaaa how dare you do that????
I don't know how things work over there in Freedom Land™, but in normal countries the terms of service don't override the law. You can't just write in the terms of service that you're gonna do illegal shit, it's still illegal.

"This app shouldn't do anything illegal" is a pretty reasonable expectation.
 

BLEEN

Member
Oct 27, 2017
4,824
once you got dozens of hits from a specific site it becomes more than cost effective to send an intern out there to confirm it vs random blind visits/anonymous tips and reports
That makes sense I guess. Still an incredibly dumb move. How much does the stream cost for a bar? If it's like the US, probably wildly expensive lol
 

Vuze

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,886
And people granted some sports app access to their phone GPS and microphone in the first place because... ? We truly live in an idiocracy.

Also, that's way too little of a fine, add a zero or two so that it actually hurts them.
 

Annatar86

Member
Jan 16, 2018
82
burn that shit to the ground.

Google/Apple knowing everything we say (even if they pretend to just listen to "keywords") is one thing as long as they use it just for profiling (which will be a problem in the future but is fine so far) and in return they give a huge service to the end-user.

La Liga doing it to further their own economical agenda against the end-user's interest while providing a "meh." app is trash and they should burn in hell.
Users might be dumb for allowing access to mic and not reading ToS (notlike most people do), but that shady shit should have never been released.
 

John Caboose

Member
Oct 26, 2017
797
Sweden
I don't know how things work over there in Freedom Land™, but in normal countries the terms of service don't override the law. You can't just write in the terms of service that you're gonna do illegal shit, it's still illegal.

"This app shouldn't do anything illegal" is a pretty reasonable expectation.
Lol yup. All that insane shit the US has about scummy shit like forced arbitration etc is simply non-enforceable in the EU.
 

Vuze

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,886
30 million dollar fine!?

are you serious
A quick google search shows that they made a net profit of 190 million € last year alone, so yes, that‘s not too outlandish. I think GDPR fines would be capped at 20 million € max in this case anyway. But the people responsible are probably laughing at the pitiful 250k.
 

CrazyAndy

Avenger
Oct 27, 2017
2,916
Actually impressed and can't hate on this. I'm sure whoever installed the app didn't read any of the Terms of Service. It's a great idea.

At this point time anyone who doesn't expect apps, especially free ones, aren't tracking all of your shit, and reselling or profiting from it, is will full ignorant.

Edit: read the actual article and they clearly told users what they were doing. Even less sympathy. Ignorance and stupidity deserves no sympathy from me.

*. "Hey by doing this we're going to do that. Please understand this before you do this"

* <Does this>

* <Does that>

* "Whaaaaaaaa how dare you do that????
Just because you put something in the TOS doesn't mean it's legal...
 

Dr. Mario

Member
Oct 27, 2017
2,615
Netherlands
I mean, yeah, fuck the privacy law, they put it in the small print.
As scientists we lately have a lot of problems with consent, ethical review boards and research data storage. Just doing a simple experiment takes ages and requires books of legalese.

We've been considering renaming our consent forms to EULAs. That way everyone automatically agrees to give up their private data for whatever without reading anything.
 

Kthulhu

Member
Oct 25, 2017
8,797
I don't know how things work over there in Freedom Land™, but in normal countries the terms of service don't override the law. You can't just write in the terms of service that you're gonna do illegal shit, it's still illegal.

"This app shouldn't do anything illegal" is a pretty reasonable expectation.
Just fyi ToS are not legally binding in the US either. Don't know if this would violate privacy laws, but if it did the ToS wouldn't protect them.
 
Oct 26, 2017
3,266
As scientists we lately have a lot of problems with consent, ethical review boards and research data storage. Just doing a simple experiment takes ages and requires books of legalese.

We've been considering renaming our consent forms to EULAs. That way everyone automatically agrees to give up their private data for whatever without reading anything.
While a witty fun idea, it still wouldn't override any laws.