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Laura Ingraham Schooled By Benjamin Watson And Awkwardly Tries To End Segment

Replicant

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How are they "extra-curricular" when they award scholarships for them? They are in the most literal sense curricular.

The only reason they are "not jobs" is because they don't get paid for it. Which is circular reasoning, as you're using them being "not jobs" as an excuse to not pay them.
That’s simply not true and you know it. If you are going to equate college athletics a job, then so are high school athletics.
 

Krejlooc

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Oct 27, 2017
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you think these star athletes are intending class?
When I was in college, I had classes with many of the University of Texas national championship winning team. I was in the bridging disciplines program which lets Comp Sci majors take RTF courses. Kasey Studdard was my lab partner in Intermedia Studies.
 

Hours Left

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Oct 26, 2017
7,846
She’s abhorrent.

I hope every one of her national failures eat away at her already hollow insides until she implodes into herself via a black hole born entirely from the toxic bile she spews.
 
Oct 27, 2017
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Because they go to school and attend classes? There are lots, and lots of paying jobs for students at universities, provided by the university themselves. Do you call paid interns, "not students"?

Again, being paid and being a student are not at all mutually exclusive.
Good point about the student jobs. Didn't think of it that way. What I think is different and what I don't respect about the process is that 80% of these students couldn't make it into these schools on academic merit. The kid working at the book store didn't get into the college solely because of his ability to generate revenue for the book store. They didn't bend the rules for him to get in. I wish athletes at colleges were actually truly students that so happened to want to represent their school in athletics. I know nobody wants that because it would hurt the school's revenue and the NFL pipeline. But this is off topic because it has nothing to do with this segment.
 

samoyed

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Oct 26, 2017
9,974
I'm under no illusion that athletes are there for an education and the sport is just their ticket in.

Hell, as far as I'm aware, the vast majority of millennials who went to college saw it as a career/investment move, so athletes picking up a check while attending blowoff courses is just them advancing their life plans by 4-8 years. Very few people are capable of attending a 4 year institution just to "broaden their horizons", and the people who can afford to do so tend to be very well off. Every one else is just chasing money and jobs.

Another way to look at it is that collegiate sport is one of the last labor markets for "unskilled" (High school Diploma or lower) labor, and it's nearly criminal that the athletes themselves are not seeing the bulk of the profits.
 

Replicant

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Oct 25, 2017
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How in the world would you personally know this? This sounds a lot like low key racism.
Calm down for a second and leave the R word out of it. Has nothing to do with race. He’s basically saying the academic standard of these big ten schools, who are know for prestige and toughness to get in, have student athletes in all divisions getting full rides in. You including race means you really just mean football and basketball. Lots of other college sports out there with kids getting full rides, who otherwise wouldn’t have gotten into that school on their grades alone.
Your views are backwards. College has increasingly become a requirement for employment these days.
No it really hasn’t. I’ll agree that the marketplace and society has put a college degree worth way more than it is, but there are plenty of good paying jobs that don’t require a 4 year degree.

With that said, I’m not going to derail the topic anymore.
 

Krejlooc

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Tim Tebow scored an 890. Is he getting into UF without being a star QB?
You've still got a long way to go before you reach 80% of players

Sam Ehlinger is currently enrolled in the McCombs School of Business, one of the most selective and difficult to get into business schools in the nation. See, I can cherry pick athletes, too.
 
Oct 27, 2017
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You've still got a long way to go before you reach 80% of players

Sam Ehlinger is currently enrolled in the McCombs School of Business, one of the most selective and difficult to get into business schools in the nation. See, I can cherry pick athletes, too.
Now cherry pick me a student that got in with an 890 without being a star athlete.
 

Krejlooc

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Now cherry pick me a student that got in with an 890 without being a star athlete.
You're asking me to prove lax admission standards for unqualified students who aren't star athletes, like that's a hard thing to do? LO-FREAKING-L. Nespotism is rampant in college admissions. For example, the "Texas A&M former students network" where 3rd generation or greater aggies are given leaner admission standards, the entire Aunt Becky thing, how Rick Perry is literally illiterate but got into college based on his oil connections, etc.
 

Replicant

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Oct 25, 2017
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You're asking me to prove lax admission standards for unqualified students who aren't star athletes, like that's a hard thing to do? LO-FREAKING-L. Nespotism is rampant in college admissions. For example, the "Texas A&M former students network" where 3rd generation or greater aggies are given leaner admission standards, the entire Aunt Becky thing, how Rick Perry is literally illiterate but got into college based on his oil connections, etc.
So what you are saying is college is corrupt and unfair, but you wanna start paying kids to play those sports. Because there will be all types of fairness and lack of corruption there.
 
Oct 27, 2017
2,826
Florida
You're asking me to prove lax admission standards for unqualified students who aren't star athletes, like that's a hard thing to do? LO-FREAKING-L. Nespotism is rampant in college admissions. For example, the "Texas A&M former students network" where 3rd generation or greater aggies are given leaner admission standards, the entire Aunt Becky thing, how Rick Perry is literally illiterate but got into college based on his oil connections, etc.
Exactly. People who make the University money. These clowns just pay straight up to get in via "donations". Athletes pay by being financially exploited. Either way if you don't have the grades to get in you're paying a lot more than just tuition.
 

Krejlooc

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So what you are saying is college is corrupt and unfair, but you wanna start paying kids to play those sports. Because there will be all types of fairness and lack of corruption there.
I believe paying people for their work, and not leaning back on lies like "they get a free education" is more fair than the current standard, yes, obviously. I pretty much spelled it out.
 

Krejlooc

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Exactly. People who make the University money. These clowns just pay straight up to get in via "donations". Athletes pay by being financially exploited. Either way if you don't have the grades to get in you're paying a lot more than just tuition.
You are still trying to dodge your claim that "80% of student athletes don't meet the academic standard." Where exactly did you come up with that figure from?
 

TAJ

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Oct 28, 2017
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That I will agree with. I fully don’t think students should get paid. They wouldn’t be students at that point. However, they should be able to do what they want with their own namesake.
I was just about to thank Krejlooc for the post you're dismissing. You are objectively wrong here.
 

Krejlooc

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Again, so we pay high school students too for their “work”?
A) Highschool students can be compensated and monetize their name, here is Colt McCoy appearing in a TV commercial before he came to Texas:


His uncle paid him for this ad, which he used as fuel while advocating for college athletes to receive pay

B) Sure, I don't see any problem at all with highschool kids being paid for dangerous work.
 

Krejlooc

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How am I objectively wrong? College athletics are not a job. Period. It’s not the same thing as a student picking up a job in the school library. Not even close.
They're "not a job" because....?

LOL at you thinking the "internships" I'm talking about are "the school library." One of my internships was doing backend server integration at UT, something they monetized.
 
Oct 27, 2017
2,826
Florida
You are still trying to dodge your claim that "80% of student athletes don't meet the academic standard." Where exactly did you come up with that figure from?
I'm not dodging. It's clearly a number I made up and I think we're both intelligent enough to understand that. You are also completely ignoring my points and not addressing them but I think you realized that we both agree that the college admissions of many athletes is just as corrupt as the Lori Laughlin scandal and the good old boys loophole networks.
 
Oct 27, 2017
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Anyone advocating for the current status quo for student-athletes is the wrongest. Pay these hard workers for their dangerous jobs that generate copious amounts of income for old white dudes.
 

Replicant

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Oct 25, 2017
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You're wrong on this one..

DICTIONARY

cir·cu·lar
/ˈsərkyələr/
Learn to pronounce
adjective
  1. 1.
    having the form of a circle.
    "the building features a circular atrium"

    synonyms:
    round, disk-shaped, disk-like; More

  2. 2.
    LOGIC
    (of an argument) already containing an assumption of what is to be proved, and therefore fallacious.
You are correct, and I’ll say my bad. My issue is I misread what was written.
 

Krejlooc

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Consider this -- if these things aren't jobs with value or worth, then why do major colleges grant their players enormous insurance packages? The entire reason they do so is because the know there is an enormous amount of worth in the value of these players. You can actually put a dollar amount on how much a college athlete is worth, individually, because colleges do it for every single player.