Learning Japanese • 日本語の勉強 |これはOTです| ゆっくりしていいぞ!

Kilrogg

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Oct 25, 2017
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Thanks for your insight. I'll still be sticking with Genki and the Human Japanese app, so I'll have some structured, tiered learning as well. Hopefully by combining the two methods I'll start to soak things in and piece things together a little more rapidly. Now that I'm home from work I'll definitely check out the MattvsJapan channel.
Just so you know, this balanced approach you're talking about (a bit of traditional learning + a bit of immersion) is literally addressed by Stephen Krashen in the video I posted earlier. According to his research, while this approach makes intuitive sense, it turns out to be wrong on the whole. Watch the video from 4:52
ytma!▶Stephen Krashen on Language Acquisition Part 1 of 2 (14:19)Filmed talk by S.Krashen - You can watch as is or you can use Self Access note-taking Task THP V 9 on Self Access page in your wiki

to hear his take. But I suggest you watch the whole vid (and part 2). I never get tired of watching it because he's so eloquent. Stupid nerd me :D.

Make what you will of that obviously, and I'm not necessarily against the notion in the very beginning of your learning... But yeah.
 
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febLey

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,204
Germany
Phew, learning a new language through a non native language of yours can sometimes be a bit straining.
My native language is german, but all my resources are in English.
I’d claim, that my ability to understand English is pretty good, I rarely have to look up words, but my brain still always works in German.
I feel like my brain is sometimes translating words from Japanese to English and then to German.
But what a neat side effect, my えいご is improving as well while I am learning 日本語.

Anyways, I’m currently pretty motivated, I’ve set myself 3 goals:
My first goal is to be able to read (and understand) the first volume of よつばと.
My second goal is that I’d like to be able to play the upcoming Animal Crossing in Japanese.
My third goal is our trip to Japan in 2021, until then I want to be very safe at the language.

Sorry, I had to dump these thoughts somewhere.
 

meadowdrone

Member
Oct 27, 2017
169
UK
I'm definitely on the side of flashcards and immersion, conversation and repetition over this intellectual analysis of grammar, so I don't tend to watch Cure Dolly's youtube videos - though I can't deny there's a really strange pull behind them. What's with the weird ass CGI character? Where are they from? What's their experience? Why are they sort of anonymous? I have so many questions.

However, I did break away from my standard flashcard study and read this book:

And honestly after having struggled with は vs が for the longest time, I thought it was fantastic and really useful short read and I'd recommend it to anyone at the post-beginner level. I felt like it just fell into place almost immediately. It was only after that I realised it was that youtuber with the weird Net Yaroze tier 3D anime teacher character.
 

Kilrogg

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Oct 25, 2017
1,866
Resilient : you sure you wanna know?

meadowdrone : if you absolutely want a book that helps you consciously understand some concepts of the language, I'd recommend Jay Rubin's Making Sense of Japanese. Very short, very well-written and fun to read. He goes over the は vs が thing too. Note that the guy was the official translator for a number of Haruki Murakami novels. I once e-mailed him about the book, and he literally replied "that book has brought me more positive feedback than anything else I've published." lol.

Gaaaah, even the title of Cure Dolly's book gets on my nerves. Japanese isn't simple. In fact, no language is simple. There is no way around the fact that it takes a massive, massive amount of time to master a language, let alone Japanese if your native language is English. We're talking thousands and thousands of hours of immersion at least.
 

Birdseye

Avenger
Oct 27, 2017
13,071
Once I finished Tobira I started re-reading it from the begining. I've been having a much easier time reading everything and it felt kind of amazing, but I just realized how soon the next JLPT session was, so I stopped reviewing Tobira and jumped to my JLPT textbooks (I'm currently using TRY! N3). I can understand the grammar fairly easily (although some of the nuances are poorly explained, which leads to bullshit mistakes on the mock tests) but the vocabulary is killing me. I have to scan a lot of shit with the Google Translate app and I'm not sure how much I can remember by december.

The next two months are gonna be intense. Honestly I don't even know if I'll have the time to start my other N3 books.
 
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Cloud-Hidden

Member
Oct 30, 2017
2,181
Just so you know, this balanced approach you're talking about (a bit of traditional learning + a bit of immersion) is literally addressed by Stephen Krashen in the video I posted earlier. According to his research, while this approach makes intuitive sense, it turns out to be wrong on the whole. Watch the video from 4:52
ytma!▶Stephen Krashen on Language Acquisition Part 1 of 2 (14:19)Filmed talk by S.Krashen - You can watch as is or you can use Self Access note-taking Task THP V 9 on Self Access page in your wiki

to hear his take. But I suggest you watch the whole vid (and part 2). I never get tired of watching it because he's so eloquent. Stupid nerd me :D.

Make what you will of that obviously, and I'm not necessarily against the notion in the very beginning of your learning... But yeah.
I watched both parts of his video, and it all makes a lot of sense to me. I guess since I'm still an absolute beginner, I'm kind of stuck at the point where I have to focus on "learning" instead of acquiring. Like... I need the furigana and some basic-ass vocab under my belt, otherwise there's no such thing as "intelligible input" for me. Even after getting through some basics, I'm not sure where I can seek out the type of input he's recommending if I can't find local classes that teach according go this method of acquisition.
 

Jintor

Member
Oct 25, 2017
17,115
for raw vocab learning, two things always helped me:

1) make sentences with the vocab
2) flashcard the shit out of the vocab in proper context sentences

just churning vocab without context is an awful brute-force way to learn

if you're at n3 and you've finished you should be able to do that amount pretty readily, if not necessarily easily

however, all of that said, flashcards is kind of my way of staying afloat only. I feel like I only learn if I'm trying to read and listen and actively adding more words etc to my vocab; flashcards is just 'maintenance' to me (and test fodder)
 

Kilrogg

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Oct 25, 2017
1,866
I watched both parts of his video, and it all makes a lot of sense to me. I guess since I'm still an absolute beginner, I'm kind of stuck at the point where I have to focus on "learning" instead of acquiring. Like... I need the furigana and some basic-ass vocab under my belt, otherwise there's no such thing as "intelligible input" for me. Even after getting through some basics, I'm not sure where I can seek out the type of input he's recommending if I can't find local classes that teach according go this method of acquisition.
First off, I pretty much agree 100% with Jintor.

Second, "comprehensible input" is an aspect where MIA differs slightly from Krashen's theory. Since comprehensible input at the beginner level would consist of boring stuff for little kids, trying to consume that kind of media would probably just turn you off the language after a while. What you can do instead is watch a show you already know and love (because you watched it with subs in the past, most likely), only without subs. It'll still be hard to pick stuff up obviously, which is why going through a beginner's grammar/vocab book will help.

Apparently the Tango N5/N4 vocab book are pretty good for that, and I helped Matt make the Anki decks for those, so in a way you'll be learning through me, and that gives me POWER over you beyond your wildest imagination! Ahem.
 

Kilrogg

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Oct 25, 2017
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One thing I forgot to mention: if you're going the MIA route, the basic plan isn't "learn the very basics, then start acquiring through immersion" in a sequential manner, but to do both alongside each other. If you're intent on actually acquiring the language at some point anyway, I need to emphasize that you're supposed to spend hours and hours on the language every day pretty much from day one. Don't go "well, I'm not confident enough, I'll just focus on textbooks for the first few months". Do both, because no matter how you go about it, you will not understand much at the beginning. You should be comfortable with not getting most of what you watch/listen to, and with ambiguity. Most of your time time should be devoted to actual immersion. The rest should be devoted to making flashcards, doing you flashcard reviews, and, in the initial stages, going through basic vocab/grammar decks such as Tango and Tae Kim. Once you're done with N5/N4 level stuff, ideally you want to drop conscious learning entirely, and devote all your time to actual immersion + flashcards. I forget the exact ratio MIA would recommend, but it goes without saying that immersion should get the bulk of your 'study' time. Don't spend hours on flashcards and reviews. They're there to prime your brain for acquisition and make immersion more efficient, not to cannibalize it. If you had to choose between immersion and flashcards, flashcards would have to go. After all, others have achieved fluency without SRS. But nobody has achieved fluency without immersion.

Anyway, I'll stop the propaganda here :p. It's getting super boring I'm sure, and you'll find all the info you need on YouTube and on the website anyway. Plus I'm not entirely up to date on the latest developments, so some of the advice I give might be inaccurate in part. Don't take all I say at face value.
 
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Jintor

Member
Oct 25, 2017
17,115
I'm not up on language theory in the same way that killduck is, but I largely agree. If I had my time again I would optimise my early stages of learning so differently, going into it with the foreknowledge that you can't do the "know 80% of what you're hearing" thing at those early stages. It's just impossible without getting bored because your comprehension is so impossibly low at that stage.

But once you're at that level, man. It just fuckin' goes. Sitting down to read something and read it in context is by far the best way to flashcard things as well, because you'll start recognising - patterns. You always read this phrase in news reports, you always hear this when it's teenage girls in a school - men in office situations - this anime trope always uses these stock phrases, or in IRL when you're at the store and that's the set phrases and the responses you're meant to give, or how they mark the exits - immersion isn't just about the words and the grammar, it's everything. It's the situation, it's the sounds, the smells, what the format of the text is, whether it's advertising or a doctor's note or whatever. That's the stuff that will help you remember things. It's not the lists of stuff in the textbook.

Fuck. I should probably read more japanese these days -____-
 

Kilrogg

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Oct 25, 2017
1,866
Yesterday, I started wondering if all this conscious studying I did - college degree, exchange year, JLPT... - didn't screw with my ability to acquire Japanese in some way. Left to my own devices, I'm just one of those nerds who like breaking down language and approach it in an analytical, hyper-conscious way, to a fault. This hasn't hampered my ability to learn English because a) English is close to my first language, b) I'd already been exposed to English before I took my first high school English class, and kept immersing alongside classes thanks to video games and the internet. I already approached the language in an intuitive manner despite the traditional classes.

But I didn't get that with Japanese. Most of my studying was through classes. I got relatively little immersion compared to English, and always with French/English subs. Plus I didn't read any books, magazines or websites in Japanese. So right now I feel both like I'm advanced and a complete noob whose brain is poisoned by too many conscious frameworks rooted in traditional learning and a translation-oriented mindset. It lowers my confidence, drive and patience to acquire Japanese, and I don't know if it's just because I struggle to find content that interests me - I mean, it's definitely a factor at least -, or if I'm having trouble resetting my brain, so to speak. So, to respond to your message succinctly, Jintor , it doesn't "just fuckin' go" for me, unfortunately. I'm so slow to read. Spoken Japanese often feels a bit too fast/slurred for me even though I have a good ear, etc. Anyway, just felt like rambling, but I'll have to investigate why I'm having these difficulties.
 

Jintor

Member
Oct 25, 2017
17,115
Oh, i'm definitely not saying it starts coming as easily as, say, your native tongue. But the more memories you associate with the words, the more things you can trigger that lead back to their actual usage and their contextual appropriateness - well, compared to a boring-ass list that has no relevance to you besides that it's in a textbook, it's so much easier than that.

This does have the issue though that you can easily get stuck in patterns of behaviour though which is a distinct disadvantage
 

Kurita

Member
Oct 26, 2017
4,054
Aside from my year at Rikkyo University, getting into owarai has been one of the best ways to boost my abilities.
 

Raybunzy

Member
Oct 26, 2017
200
One thing I forgot to mention: if you're going the MIA route, the basic plan isn't "learn the very basics, then start acquiring through immersion" in a sequential manner, but to do both alongside each other. If you're intent on actually acquiring the language at some point anyway, I need to emphasize that you're supposed to spend hours and hours on the language every day pretty much from day one. Don't go "well, I'm not confident enough, I'll just focus on textbooks for the first few months". Do both, because no matter how you go about it, you will not understand much at the beginning. You should be comfortable with not getting most of what you watch/listen to, and with ambiguity. Most of your time time should be devoted to actual immersion. The rest should be devoted to making flashcards, doing you flashcard reviews, and, in the initial stages, going through basic vocab/grammar decks such as Tango and Tae Kim. Once you're done with N5/N4 level stuff, ideally you want to drop conscious learning entirely, and devote all your time to actual immersion + flashcards. I forget the exact ratio MIA would recommend, but it goes without saying that immersion should get the bulk of your 'study' time. Don't spend hours on flashcards and reviews. They're there to prime your brain for acquisition and make immersion more efficient, not to cannibalize it. If you had to choose between immersion and flashcards, flashcards would have to go. After all, others have achieved fluency without SRS. But nobody has achieved fluency without immersion.

Anyway, I'll stop the propaganda here :p. It's getting super boring I'm sure, and you'll find all the info you need on YouTube and on the website anyway. Plus I'm not entirely up to date on the latest developments, so some of the advice I give might be inaccurate in part. Don't take all I say at face value.

Not boring at all, to me its been but a wealthy share of knewledge. I have limited time per day to conscious/active study so will be doing the most of it. Even though Matt recommends doing all the kanji then going for grammar/vocab I dont see myself doing that with the cost of my sanity. Will test devoting part of my scheadule to kanji and another to grammar and reviews. Even if it will take more time.

Regarding immersion, my phone, car and even office computer been non stop diffusing content with japanese audio. Started a few days ago and that uneasy feeling of : "Where does a word start, where does it end, where are the gramaticall links? This is a nightmare" been less of an issue. I suppose, knowing already 3 languages (one of which uses alot of phonetic assimilations) on a high degree is helping bearing fruits more rapidly.

One thing that is missing is real conversation interaction. Will be checking local japanese communities first then online tools that will put me in contact with people.
 

L Thammy

Spacenoid
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Oct 25, 2017
16,716
This question feels kind of boring in a page that's already got big rants on it, but how common is it to write いう as ゆー? Randomly popped open Yu-Gi-Oh! (shut up and let me live out my otaku phase) and now I'm wondering if it's some quirk of the author or if this is a totally normal thing I haven't seen until now.
 

Kilrogg

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Oct 25, 2017
1,866
This question feels kind of boring in a page that's already got big rants on it, but how common is it to write いう as ゆー? Randomly popped open Yu-Gi-Oh! (shut up and let me live out my otaku phase) and now I'm wondering if it's some quirk of the author or if this is a totally normal thing I haven't seen until now.
I don't know about writing it, but saying it that way is very common. You'll even hear people say ゆって instead of いって, as if the 'real' verb was ゆ-う and not い-う. That pronunciation is pretty much ubiquitous.
 

Kurita

Member
Oct 26, 2017
4,054
This question feels kind of boring in a page that's already got big rants on it, but how common is it to write いう as ゆー? Randomly popped open Yu-Gi-Oh! (shut up and let me live out my otaku phase) and now I'm wondering if it's some quirk of the author or if this is a totally normal thing I haven't seen until now.
It’s pretty common in casual speech.
Like どういうこと becoming どゆこと.
 

sackboy97

Member
Oct 26, 2017
1,589
Italy
Does anyone know if it's possible to make Anki keep playing the audio after I answer a card? To better explain myself, at the moment I read the sentence, flip the card, the audio starts playing and I answer; if I pick an answer it moves to the next card and cuts the audio. Would it be possible to let it play out instead?
 

febLey

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,204
Germany
I've started with WaniKani a week ago and reached level 2 two days ago.
From time to time I'm mixing up on'yomi and kun'yomi and I sometimes don't know what the reading is, when there's Hiragana attached to the Kanji.
But I hope this comes with the routine.
Besides that it so far works really well for me. I think it'll be worth my 9 bucks a month.

I'm very curious how far it'll get me.
 

deadfolk

Member
Oct 25, 2017
2,713
Apologies if this has been answered a thousand times in this thread already (which it probably has), but it's long enough now to make finding answers tricky.

Any suggestions for a game to play in Japanese suitable for someone around N5 level? Kana or Kanji is fine - I'm L17 on wanikani, and I have no problem looking up Kanji as long as it's not an old game where the Kanji is so low res that I can't make out the strokes.

I'd really like something that can be played on a handheld, either directly or via emulation.
 

Nakho

Member
Nov 1, 2017
60
Newer Pokemon games have Kanji as an option (no furigana, though). They also put spaces between words in the sentence, which can also be helpful.

 

RpgN

Member
Oct 25, 2017
524
The Netherlands
I’ve noticed Detective Pikachu giving you options to choose kana and kanji. Some kanji have furigana. It’s the European version. So you don’t have to import the game.
 

sackboy97

Member
Oct 26, 2017
1,589
Italy
I have realised I haven't posted any general updates in a while. I had little over a month of free time after the end of my exams in July, though I ended up not doing much Japanese related. It wasn't really a lack of motivation, I just didn't have anything specific I wanted to read or play. I also started playing the piano during that time, which definitely didn't help.

I have been steadily going through the Jalup decks, at the slow pace of 10 new cards a day. Still, I'm quite satisfied I haven't missed a day in probably over a year at this point; though it's a bit limiting I do feel it's been quite helpful.

A couple of weeks ago I started (or rather re-started) reading 国境の南、太陽の西 by Murakami. Though demonstrably false, I feel like I'm progressing at a pretty fast pace; I have read about 10% of the book so far (with other non-Japanese books in between) and I'm enjoying it a lot, so much so that I haven't been reading any other book beside it these past few days.
I noticed a marked improvement in my understanding of the first few pages (which I believe I had last read some months ago) and in general I feel a lot more confident. There are many sentences I understand as I read them, a decent amount I have to think on for a bit, and a few I honestly just don't quite get. I am looking up nearly every word I find; I know some people suggest just going with it, but I much prefer taking my time like this (also, as I'm reading on a Kindle, looking them up is quite quick).
I'm not making any Anki cards from it, in part because I don't like making them that much, but mostly because it just takes a long time; even if I had them, if I were to add 5-10 new cards a day on top of the other 10 I would definitely end up not having enough time to review them in the morning.

I'm also doing my best to read an NHK Easy article whenever I get a chance (though I haven't been that diligent about it). The grammar is indeed easy, but since they cover a wide variety of topics it's always good vocab practice.
 

deadfolk

Member
Oct 25, 2017
2,713
deadfolk Pokémon. Though the lack of kanji can be a boon or a curse.
Newer Pokemon games have Kanji as an option (no furigana, though). They also put spaces between words in the sentence, which can also be helpful.

I’ve noticed Detective Pikachu giving you options to choose kana and kanji. Some kanji have furigana. It’s the European version. So you don’t have to import the game.
Thanks all. I'll look into those. Kana without spaces is a nightmare for me, so the option of Kanji might be useful.
 

Jintor

Member
Oct 25, 2017
17,115
i should probably get back on the NHK Easy train whenever I have a moment since it's so fast to consume nowadays and it gives my brain that good dopemine to do a thing good

mmmm, dopemine
 

DeusOcha

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,073
SoCal, US
So I'll be working in Japan as an ALT this coming spring (March 2020) and I figured I should be studying Japanese again prior to heading out to be best prepared. Issue is currently I'm using DuoLingo and find it awkward to use in terms of getting back into studying. Anyone have recommendations? My goal is being able to atleast hold basic conversations prior to moving over there (since I'll be working with kids).

My experience with Japanese is courses I took in college revolving around the Genki 1 and Genki 2 books which I unfortunately don't have anymore (sold most of my college textbooks after graduating). Should I go back and purchase both books as a refresher or are there other resources out there? The OP mentions a grammar dictionary?
 

RpgN

Member
Oct 25, 2017
524
The Netherlands
So I'll be working in Japan as an ALT this coming spring (March 2020) and I figured I should be studying Japanese again prior to heading out to be best prepared. Issue is currently I'm using DuoLingo and find it awkward to use in terms of getting back into studying. Anyone have recommendations? My goal is being able to atleast hold basic conversations prior to moving over there (since I'll be working with kids).

My experience with Japanese is courses I took in college revolving around the Genki 1 and Genki 2 books which I unfortunately don't have anymore (sold most of my college textbooks after graduating). Should I go back and purchase both books as a refresher or are there other resources out there? The OP mentions a grammar dictionary?
The methods discussed here are mostly about massive immersion. Watching videos and learning vocabulary helps with understanding Japanese and eventually use that to speak naturally when you’re familiar with repeated Japanese.

If your goal is to mostly hold basic conversations, then I guess Genki 1 & 2 are pretty good for that. I hope others can help you with recommending more resources.

Duolingo is massively improved since the last major update. Especially the newer lessons on higher levels have useful vocabulary. But it’s indeed not to use as your main source or for having basic conversations. I would still stick with it to get to those lessons but you do need something else with more priority.
 
OP
OP
Resilient

Resilient

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,358
Go back to Genki 1 and 2 - isn't that the ALT starter pack?
Then move on to Tobira I guess.

There are better ways but that's the standard that basically all starters love to go with.
 

Hypron

Member
Oct 27, 2017
3,660
NZ
Haven't checked the thread in a while. New video about setting up morphman:


The resulting workflow is super streamlined. The dictionary add on isn't compatible with Linux yet so I can't use it right now, but it'll be good next year when I start studying JP full time.

いやだ、ハイパローンさんと会うチャンスがないになった。残念だけど、いい仕事を持ったと思うから、おめでとう。

Fuck i hope that makes sense. When you don't output often you get way less confident :<
Aw, don't worry I might be back next year trying to get a full time job haha 😀. Thanks!
 

Kilrogg

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Oct 25, 2017
1,866
Haven't checked the thread in a while. New video about setting up morphman:


The resulting workflow is super streamlined. The dictionary add on isn't compatible with Linux yet so I can't use it right now, but it'll be good next year when I start studying JP full time.
I really have to get into Morphman at some point. It's like the ultimate tool for lazybones like myself.
 

L Thammy

Spacenoid
Member
Oct 25, 2017
16,716
アニモーフと言えば、何人のエラのメンバーは秘密にイェルクですか?
 

Nakho

Member
Nov 1, 2017
60
I took about 30 min to setup Morphman this morning. It's pretty easy if you already know your way with Anki stuff.
 

iCham

Member
Oct 27, 2017
1,036
Back to Japanese classes, feels good. We don't mess anymore, 30 new kanji in the first class ha ha.

I love the kanji . It looks like a smug face. Rather fitting for the "prince, official, government" meaning of it.
 

Cloud-Hidden

Member
Oct 30, 2017
2,181
Is there really no mobile equivalent to Anki? Everyone keeps mentioning it so I looked it up, and it seems like something you have to set up on your computer, and the software doesn't look very intuitive either.

How is this not more streamlined for how popular it is?
 

Nakho

Member
Nov 1, 2017
60
Is there really no mobile equivalent to Anki? Everyone keeps mentioning it so I looked it up, and it seems like something you have to set up on your computer, and the software doesn't look very intuitive either.

How is this not more streamlined for how popular it is?
There is. AnkiDroid is free and the iOS one is 25 bucks. There's also a website where you can do your reps.

However, they're only good for repping after you've already set up your decks and add-ons in the desktop app. So yeah, you'll want to have the desktop one.
 
Oct 26, 2017
842
I live in the US and want to get a Switch. I want to play Nintendo games in Japanese for practice. I know it's region free, which is great, but I prefer to buy physical media. If I buy the US versions of say BotW and Ring Fit, could I play them in Japanese?
 

Kilrogg

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Oct 25, 2017
1,866
I live in the US and want to get a Switch. I want to play Nintendo games in Japanese for practice. I know it's region free, which is great, but I prefer to buy physical media. If I buy the US versions of say BotW and Ring Fit, could I play them in Japanese?
If it's anything like the European version, you'll at worst have to download a Japanese language patch. You have to change your OS language to Japanese for that. That seems to be the way it works for most games, though I haven't played Ring Fit.
 

Cloud-Hidden

Member
Oct 30, 2017
2,181
I live in the US and want to get a Switch. I want to play Nintendo games in Japanese for practice. I know it's region free, which is great, but I prefer to buy physical media. If I buy the US versions of say BotW and Ring Fit, could I play them in Japanese?
Breath of the Wild lets you play with Japanese VO and subtitles if you prefer, or with English subtitles. You can mix and match the dubs and subs as you like.

I don't remember seeing language options for Ring Fit, but I also wasn't looking for them specifically.
 
OP
OP
Resilient

Resilient

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,358
If it's anything like the European version, you'll at worst have to download a Japanese language patch. You have to change your OS language to Japanese for that. That seems to be the way it works for most games, though I haven't played Ring Fit.
Yes. Switch your language settings to Japanese at the system level and it’ll automatically launch games in Japanese.

You’ll only have issues with buying games off the Japanese eShop, unless you have a prepaid card or a Japanese 3ds.
 
Oct 26, 2017
842
Awesome. Thanks for the insight everyone.
Yes. Switch your language settings to Japanese at the system level and it’ll automatically launch games in Japanese.

You’ll only have issues with buying games off the Japanese eShop, unless you have a prepaid card or a Japanese 3ds.
I do have a Japanese 3DS actually. How would that help me with buying Japanese games off the eShop?
 

Cloud-Hidden

Member
Oct 30, 2017
2,181
I don't believe you need to adjust your system language to play BotW in Japanese. I think it's an option within the game. It was a featured update.
 

Jintor

Member
Oct 25, 2017
17,115
Is there really no mobile equivalent to Anki? Everyone keeps mentioning it so I looked it up, and it seems like something you have to set up on your computer, and the software doesn't look very intuitive either.

How is this not more streamlined for how popular it is?
ankidroid rules. the anki desktop app is what i get annoyed at - for whatever reason the UI doesn't scale properly, so it looks fucking god awful on my machines, which are always set to 110% res or higher. it works though.
 
OP
OP
Resilient

Resilient

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,358
Awesome. Thanks for the insight everyone.

I do have a Japanese 3DS actually. How would that help me with buying Japanese games off the eShop?
For some reason, you can’t use a foreign credit card to add credit to your wallet through the Japanese Switch eshop. If you don’t have a prepaid card from Japan, your only other option is to:

1. Link your 3DS eShop account to your Switch eShop account. Both need to have their region set to Japan, and all details (DOB etc) must match.
2. Add money to your 3DS eShop account - because this eShop does accept foreign credit cards.
3. Head to the Switch eShop and buy the game you're after.

I did this over the weekend for Moon. It just takes some time to get everything up to date and linked, but once it's done, you're set from then on out.