Learning Japanese • 日本語の勉強 |これはOTです| ゆっくりしていいぞ!

febLey

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,241
Germany
I feel you. The problem with WK is that if you slow down a single day, things pile up, so you have to create a whole system around it and schedule it so that you can do other things on top of it.

Its very time consuming, but its also very effective. I will try to balance it a bit more, trying for 12 days in average, to see how it feels. This takes 95% of my available "japanese studing time", so its a good thing we are also learning vocabulary on top of the Kanji.
I started the habit of doing at least 3 or at most 4 sessions a day:
A morning session, where I do reviews and about 10 to 20 new lessons,
a lunch session where I'll rereview the morning lessons,
sometimes an afternoon session where I can re-review the failed items from my lunch session.
And lastly a session before going to bed, where I'll do the last review of the morning lessons for the day.
So this fits perfectly with the WK SRS interval: 4 hours, 8 hours and 12 hours for the failed items.
My sessions don't take up more than 15 minutes expet the morning one.
 

Leo-Tyrant

Member
Jan 14, 2019
1,177
San Jose, Costa Rica
I started the habit of doing at least 3 or at most 4 sessions a day:
A morning session, where I do reviews and about 10 to 20 new lessons,
a lunch session where I'll rereview the morning lessons,
sometimes an afternoon session where I can re-review the failed items from my lunch session.
And lastly a session before going to bed, where I'll do the last review of the morning lessons for the day.
So this fits perfectly with the WK SRS interval: 4 hours, 8 hours and 12 hours for the failed items.
My sessions don't take up more than 15 minutes expet the morning one.
That seems optimal.

Due to work, I don't have a lot of spaces where I can add sessions, so my cycle looks something like: 100 reviews in the morning, 150 reviews in the night. Lessons as soon as they show up.

I'm not using any scripts (no Kanji first reordering).

Its rough.
 

DassoBrother

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,059
Saskatchewan
Has anyone tried Mango? My library offers it for free so I might try to switch to that, maybe give Duolingo a break since it's feeling too restricted and I'm not sure how much I'm actually learning from it. I'm going through the free levels of Wanikani too. I just started level 3 so I should be done with the free levels by the end of this week. I'd like to continue but might need to take a short break before paying for premium. I can't afford a lifetime subscription right now but will probably try it out for another year.

febLey I got the Dictionary of Basic Japanese Grammar last week but haven't looked at it much yet. Is it worth reading through some of the earlier sections or just keep it as a reference for any lessons I end up taking. I'm guessing it'll be very useful if i get Genki I.
 

Coverly

Member
Oct 28, 2017
169
That seems optimal.

Due to work, I don't have a lot of spaces where I can add sessions, so my cycle looks something like: 100 reviews in the morning, 150 reviews in the night. Lessons as soon as they show up.

I'm not using any scripts (no Kanji first reordering).

Its rough.
If you really want to optimize your time those scripts are a must. I have 3 or 4 installed and they are useful. The first one is the timeline one so I can see when the large chunks of reviews are coming in. Seeing it days ahead I can plan around it.
The other two are for reviews: redo answer and the one where you type the japanese right after the meaning of the same word. Redo is a life saver because it's never optimal when taking a test, either it's too early/late or your mind is preoccupied with something else. The other i swear has cut my time taking the tests by more than half. By having to type the japanese spelling right after the meaning of the same word, it really speeds up your test. Don't know why this is, but it's so much faster now. The only reason my tests take time is because I review fully the ones I got wrong at the end.

Try it with the scripts I mentioned, you should be able to squeeze some more reviews this way.

Haven't been on this thread in a while. Hmm.. lvl 45 in wk, stopped bunpro because of lack to time to properly devote to it, and playing division 2, modern warfare, and rise of the tomb raider in japanese. It's not a lot though, I only play like 3 or 4 hrs of games on a good week.
 

febLey

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,241
Germany
That seems optimal.

Due to work, I don't have a lot of spaces where I can add sessions, so my cycle looks something like: 100 reviews in the morning, 150 reviews in the night. Lessons as soon as they show up.

I'm not using any scripts (no Kanji first reordering).

Its rough.
If you really want to optimize your time those scripts are a must. I have 3 or 4 installed and they are useful. The first one is the timeline one so I can see when the large chunks of reviews are coming in. Seeing it days ahead I can plan around it.
The other two are for reviews: redo answer and the one where you type the japanese right after the meaning of the same word. Redo is a life saver because it's never optimal when taking a test, either it's too early/late or your mind is preoccupied with something else. The other i swear has cut my time taking the tests by more than half. By having to type the japanese spelling right after the meaning of the same word, it really speeds up your test. Don't know why this is, but it's so much faster now. The only reason my tests take time is because I review fully the ones I got wrong at the end.

Try it with the scripts I mentioned, you should be able to squeeze some more reviews this way.

Haven't been on this thread in a while. Hmm.. lvl 45 in wk, stopped bunpro because of lack to time to properly devote to it, and playing division 2, modern warfare, and rise of the tomb raider in japanese. It's not a lot though, I only play like 3 or 4 hrs of games on a good week.
When did. both of you start with WaniKani?
Has anyone tried Mango? My library offers it for free so I might try to switch to that, maybe give Duolingo a break since it's feeling too restricted and I'm not sure how much I'm actually learning from it. I'm going through the free levels of Wanikani too. I just started level 3 so I should be done with the free levels by the end of this week. I'd like to continue but might need to take a short break before paying for premium. I can't afford a lifetime subscription right now but will probably try it out for another year.

febLey I got the Dictionary of Basic Japanese Grammar last week but haven't looked at it much yet. Is it worth reading through some of the earlier sections or just keep it as a reference for any lessons I end up taking. I'm guessing it'll be very useful if i get Genki I.
I keep it as reference, but it can’t be wrong to just read upon it.
 

Coverly

Member
Oct 28, 2017
169
When did. both of you start with WaniKani?
Mid Feb of 19. It took around two months to understand and get used to one week levels and tune them to a schedule I could follow, so it was really slow in the beginning. but after that it's been a level a week. I had to sacrifice my Sunday and Wednesday nights though for it, but once you get into the habit it's not too bad. I did have to give up bunpro though to keep this pace, it was burning me out.
 

Leo-Tyrant

Member
Jan 14, 2019
1,177
San Jose, Costa Rica
When did. both of you start with WaniKani?
July, 2019.

Coverly I don't want to set up scripts (although I admit that a re-ordering one that would put the radicals and Kanji always on top when you level up would be nice), as I believe the default experience should, in theory, be optimal for memorization. I don't want to "beat" the system like a video game, I want things to stick, and vocabulary has always helped me in remembering the actual Kanji. I may be mistaken but I want to keep doing it like this.

(It also forces me to pay attention when writing the answers, as I don't have an "undo" option)

Like you, I also stopped all other services like Bunpro (only reading Human Japanese or Tae Kim when I travel) as WK takes away all of my available time.
 
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Coverly

Member
Oct 28, 2017
169
July, 2019.

Coverly I don't want to set up scripts (although I admit that a re-ordering one that would put the radicals and Kanji always on top when you level up would be nice), as I believe the default experience should, in theory, be optimal for memorization. I don't want to "beat" the system like a video game, I want things to stick, and vocabulary has always helped me in remembering the actual Kanji. I may be mistaken but I want to keep doing it like this.

(It also forces me to pay attention when writing the answers, as I don't have an "undo" option)

Like you, I also stopped all other services like Bunpro (only reading Human Japanese or Tae Kim when I travel) as WK takes away all of my available time.
Sounds good. Let us know how it goes around lvl 30 or so and if the kanji and vocab stick to burn consistently (you're burning stuff now right? how is it going so far?). It's been fine with me, but there have been some really embarrassing ones like missing noon or geisha when their times comes to burn.
 

Leo-Tyrant

Member
Jan 14, 2019
1,177
San Jose, Costa Rica
Sounds good. Let us know how it goes around lvl 30 or so and if the kanji and vocab stick to burn consistently (you're burning stuff now right? how is it going so far?). It's been fine with me, but there have been some really embarrassing ones like missing noon or geisha when their times comes to burn.
I have 0 burns so far :( These are my stats:

Level:20
  • Average Level-up:8 days, 16 hours
  • Start Date:2019-07-17 (166 days ago)
  • Items Learned (Guru+): 313部首 658漢字 2029単語
  • Radicals: 95.16%95.16%
  • Kanji: 96.15%97.51%96.82%
  • Vocabulary: 90.76%92.36%91.55%
  • 136 Apprentice / 617 Guru / 691 Master / 1692 enlightened / 0 burned
What happens when you burn an item? Do you have to wait another 4 months for it?
 

febLey

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,241
Germany
I have 0 burns so far :( These are my stats:

Level:20
  • Average Level-up:8 days, 16 hours
  • Start Date:2019-07-17 (166 days ago)
  • Items Learned (Guru+): 313部首 658漢字 2029単語
  • Radicals: 95.16%95.16%
  • Kanji: 96.15%97.51%96.82%
  • Vocabulary: 90.76%92.36%91.55%
  • 136 Apprentice / 617 Guru / 691 Master / 1692 enlightened / 0 burned
What happens when you burn an item? Do you have to wait another 4 months for it?
When you've burned it, it doesn't return. I'd recommend to use KameSame, for your burned items.
 

splash wave

Member
Oct 25, 2017
667
Bay Area, CA
I must say, teaching yourself Japanese via Genki is a supremely frustrating and occasionally demoralizing experience. There are just *so* many odds and ends and casual/conversational quirks that occasionally pop up without explanation, and I never feel like it + the workbook provide enough practice activities. Also, my listening comprehension is horrendous, but maybe this will get better with time.

Anyway, I'm just venting a bit. Reading is certainly easier, which I guess is the best I can hope for outside of a classroom setting or actually living in Japan.
 

Jintor

Member
Oct 25, 2017
17,603
i finally read a whole manga in japanese.

well, ok. probably about 80-85% of it. but i understood it, and I wasn't totally exhausted by it, so I'll take that for now.

gonna go through it slowly again and comb through it.
 

DassoBrother

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,059
Saskatchewan
I finally finished the free levels of WaniKani and have been using BunPro slowly. I'll probably sign up for a year of WaniKani either way but I did message them hoping to get a coupon, I'd likely just get a lifetime subscription next Christmas if I'm still making progress by then.

I dropped Duolingo for now and keep meaning to try to work through lessons in Mango so that'll be my goal for the next couple weeks. I'd really like to try to watch/read something soon and follow the speaking and listening instructions from the OT. I feel like it's very early still but that'd force me to use Anki and create some of my own cards which would probably help lots.
 

febLey

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,241
Germany
I just took a look at an example JLPT N5.
I looks pretty easy to me, so I thought about skipping it, but I’m not confident that I can get on N4 level until summer.
On the other side, I’m not in the hurry, I‘m only doing these to prove myself.

EDIT: Oops, just noticed that I only looked at the vocabulary part and oversaw the grammar, reading and listing parts.
It still looks doable right now, but it's much stuff for just 2 hours. So it's definitely going to be N5 for me in summer.

I finally finished the free levels of WaniKani and have been using BunPro slowly. I'll probably sign up for a year of WaniKani either way but I did message them hoping to get a coupon, I'd likely just get a lifetime subscription next Christmas if I'm still making progress by then.

I dropped Duolingo for now and keep meaning to try to work through lessons in Mango so that'll be my goal for the next couple weeks. I'd really like to try to watch/read something soon and follow the speaking and listening instructions from the OT. I feel like it's very early still but that'd force me to use Anki and create some of my own cards which would probably help lots.
Sounds good, keep us updated :)
Too bad, that the WaniKani Lifetime sale just ended.
Few months ago they also gave me a coupon, so your chances are good.
 
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Mendrox

Member
Oct 26, 2017
5,457
Wanikani is great and showed me the ways how to get started at all. Learned a shit ton over those past 8 months with Genki, playing games, watching anime without subtitles and trying to read on asahi.com
 

Eien1no1Yami

Member
Oct 30, 2017
663
So I was playing a game recently and one of the characters said the following: "隊長質問。 おやつは参拾円まで"
The dialogue was voiced so I understood what she meant but looking at the kanji I was like "wait a minute..."
I figured it out afterwards but it was so strange xD.
There so many different ways to write this one, why choose this?
And it was a kid no less..
Writing it in Katakana would make much more sense than this honestly
 

Kurita

Member
Oct 26, 2017
4,379
So I was playing a game recently and one of the characters said the following: "隊長質問。 おやつは参拾円まで"
The dialogue was voiced so I understood what she meant but looking at the kanji I was like "wait a minute..."
I figured it out afterwards but it was so strange xD.
There so many different ways to write this one, why choose this?
And it was a kid no less..
Writing it in Katakana would make much more sense than this honestly
Do you have more context?
 
Oct 25, 2017
295
Japan
It being Sakura Wars makes that make perfect sense. That sort of kanji usage is very evocative of pre-WWII Japan, which is one of the main motifs of that series.
 

Eien1no1Yami

Member
Oct 30, 2017
663
It being Sakura Wars makes that make perfect sense. That sort of kanji usage is very evocative of pre-WWII Japan, which is one of the main motifs of that series.
Why a kid character though?And why this scene specifically?
It's not like the whole game uses these types of kanji for numbering...
also if this usage was pre-WWII Japan why did they use this instead of using 三十 which are the original chinise characters anyway?
can anyone give more context into to this?Did they change this after WWII?
 
Oct 25, 2017
295
Japan
Why a kid character though?And why this scene specifically?
It's not like the whole game uses these types of kanji for numbering...
also if this usage was pre-WWII Japan why did they use this instead of using 三十 which are the original chinise characters anyway?
can anyone give more context into to this?Did they change this after WWII?
Maybe because it's voiced dialogue. It may have had a different editor or different style guide compared to the system text which prioritizes readability. Or maybe it's just inconsistent application of stylization/editing. It's kind of hard to say without having been there. It definitely is done for a certain effect though.

Those characters were used (and still are in some contexts) because the standard characters for numerals can very easily be modified into other numerals by adding strokes. You can read about them here: https://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/大字_(数字)

You can still find them in use today on currency (and on the signs for a certain curry franchise) and you'll not infrequently see them on handwritten signs in izakaya and stuff, particularly those with an older aesthetic.
 

Eien1no1Yami

Member
Oct 30, 2017
663
Maybe because it's voiced dialogue. It may have had a different editor or different style guide compared to the system text which prioritizes readability. Or maybe it's just inconsistent application of stylization/editing. It's kind of hard to say without having been there. It definitely is done for a certain effect though.

Those characters were used (and still are in some contexts) because the standard characters for numerals can very easily be modified into other numerals by adding strokes. You can read about them here: https://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/大字_(数字)

You can still find them in use today on currency (and on the signs for a certain curry franchise) and you'll not infrequently see them on handwritten signs in izakaya and stuff, particularly those with an older aesthetic.
Thanks for this!

漢数字の大字だいじとは、一、二、三、十などの漢字が書き換えられてしまったりしないように使われる漢字です。つまり、 改竄かいざん されないように使われます。また、金銭を表記する際などの、改まった書き方をする場合などにも使われます。
Welp that sums it up pretty nicely xD
 

RangerBAD

Member
Oct 25, 2017
770
「なら余計にここに居なければなるまい?お前の亡骸を伴って帰ってやらねばな」

Is ねばな the same as ねばならない or is just a な?
 

Kilrogg

Resettlement Advisor
Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,990
「なら余計にここに居なければなるまい?お前の亡骸を伴って帰ってやらねばな」

Is ねばな the same as ねばならない or is just a な?
-(あ)ねば is just an old-fashioned way of saying as -(あ)なければ.

If you're familiar with the old anime Casshern, the narrator's catchphrase in that show was 「キャシャーンがやらねば、誰がやる?」, which means "If Casshern doesn't do it, who will?"

The な at the end of your sentence is unrelated. It's just a regular end-of-sentence particle.
 

RangerBAD

Member
Oct 25, 2017
770
-(あ)ねば is just an old-fashioned way of saying as -(あ)なければ.

If you're familiar with the old anime Casshern, the narrator's catchphrase in that show was 「キャシャーンがやらねば、誰がやる?」, which means "If Casshern doesn't do it, who will?"

The な at the end of your sentence is unrelated. It's just a regular end-of-sentence particle.

So what is that sentence saying?
 

Kilrogg

Resettlement Advisor
Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,990

So what is that sentence saying?
You mean your sentence? You'd have to give me more context, but something along the lines of:

"In that case, all the more reason for me/you/him/her/us/them [Japanese pronouns amirite] to stay here a while longer, right? If I/he/she/we/they're not going home with your remains, that is."

But I'm not 100% confident; what's the situation though? Who's talking to who about what?
 

RangerBAD

Member
Oct 25, 2017
770
You mean your sentence? You'd have to give me more context, but something along the lines of:

"In that case, all the more reason for me/you/him/her/us/them [Japanese pronouns amirite] to stay here a while longer, right? If I/he/she/we/they're not going home with your remains, that is."

But I'm not 100% confident; what's the situation though? Who's talking to who about what?
Here is the page.
 
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Kilrogg

Resettlement Advisor
Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,990
Check the link again.
Thanks. I realize I still struggle with this kind of sentence. After all these years, ugh. I've honestly been rereading and thinking about this sentence and the page you linked all this time, and I just can't parse it, and it makes me mad at myself. Even though I understand 100% of the rest of the page, I don't get it.

This is what happens when you try to force yourself to understand something through conscious knowledge of grammar and vocabulary when your brain isn't ready to pick it up naturally; sure, I understand every individual part of the line, but I don't get the line. I know all the words, I know なるまい is just ならないだろう, I know that やらねば is simply やらなければ and, in this specific case, that there is most likely an implied なければならない (as in, "I must") in there, yet the whole thing doesn't make sense when I try to bring the two sentences together. I don't know if it's some nuance I don't understand about 余計に, or if なければ and なるまい interact in some unique way, but the two sentences just don't compute together in my mind.

The takeaway is that, as painful as it is to admit for me, this is above my level even though it shouldn't be. Anyone else wanna chime in? What am I getting wrong?
 

Kurita

Member
Oct 26, 2017
4,379
The way I understood the situation : the girl asks the dude if he’s got any plans, jokingly suggesting sightseeing. He explains that it’s his job to wait for her team (I guess, I don’t know what the manga is about)
She then asks something like "Do you think we could just all get killed?"

The dude then says "Well, all the more reason for me to say here then. [Because] I’ll have to bring your remains back home." (てやる being てあげる)

My two cents, but I’m not sure either.
 
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Kilrogg

Resettlement Advisor
Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,990
The way I understood the situation : the girl asks the dude if he’s got any plans, jokingly suggesting sightseeing. He explains that it’s his job to wait for her team (I guess, I don’t know what the manga is about)
She then asks something like "Do you think we could just all get killed?"

The dude then says "Well, all the more reason for me to say here then. [Because] I’ll have to bring your remains back home." (てやる being てあげる)

My two cents.
Right. To me it's something like (forgive the poor English translation skills, not my native language)
"Are you planning to go sightseeing, maybe?"
"I intend to welcome you all when you come back from battle, at least."
"You mean it?"
"I'm taking care of the mobile suits [is this Gundam?]. At least let me have a taste of fun.*"
"We could all die. Plans fail sometimes, you know."
"All the more reason for me to stay here a while longer**, then. I'll have to bring your remains back home."

* When he says 「それぐらいの楽しみは味わせてほしいものだが」, I'm not sure if the taste of fun he's referring to is the welcoming of the soldiers, or the taking care of the MS.
** I'm having trouble understanding the exact function of 余計に here.

What's your take? What I don't get is how his last line relates to his lines about welcoming everyone and having his fun. It's almost like the lines contradict each other, but this is probably because there's something I don't quite get.

[EDIT] Wait, 余計に is "all the more", I'm dumb.
 

Kurita

Member
Oct 26, 2017
4,379
To give a clear answer I’d need more than a random page of a manga I haven’t read to be honest lol

I also think translating 出迎える as "welcoming back" is not exactly appropriate. "Picking up" (like, right on the battlefield once they’re done) would be more appropriate. So he looks forward to doing that, since he’s in charge of the mobile suits.
The "remains" might refer to the pieces of their blown up mobile suits lol? Like, he’s more concerned about these than the actual humans?
 
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Kilrogg

Resettlement Advisor
Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,990
To give a clear answer I’d need more than a random page of a manga I haven’t read to be honest lol
Believe it or not, this reassures me somewhat lol. If you're not 100% sure yourself, I guess I shouldn't feel so bad about it.

RangerBAD no worries. That said, it's true that, generally speaking, it's better to provide as much context as possible. It would be true of any language, but it's especially true with a highly context-dependent language like Japanese.
 
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RangerBAD

Member
Oct 25, 2017
770
Believe it or not, this reassures me somewhat lol. If you're not 100% sure yourself, I guess I shouldn't feel so bad about it.

RangerBAD no worries. That said, it's true that, generally speaking, it's better to provide as much context as possible. It would be true of any language, but it's especially true with a highly context-dependent language like Japanese.
Always feel free to ask if I haven't provided enough. There's not character blurbs this volume.
 

sackboy97

Member
Oct 26, 2017
1,653
Italy
I came across this neat new blog/website on Reddit: 語彙力倶楽部, in which the author posts a somewhat rare/unusual vocab everyday, with a definition and example sentences. It seems pretty cool, they also have a newsletter set up.
 

JLateralus

Member
Oct 27, 2017
15
Hey all, just stumbled across this thread. I'm fairly early in my journey to learn Japanese. I've always wanted to give it a go, and a couple of years ago a friend that is fluent talked me into playing Dragon Quest X, which is the Japanese only DQ MMO. I muddled my way through the menus and he translated parts of the story for me in-game.

Anyway, it got to the point where I felt bad for relying on him and considering I'd always wanted to learn Japanese anyway, I started picking up kana with Duolingo. Unfortunately, that's about where it ended for me then. Over the last couple of years I've dabbled here and there but nothing concrete until around last September. I picked Duolingo back up and started looking at Human Japanese. I've seen dropped both and have been focusing on Wanikani and have done Kanji reviews every day for the last 3-4 months, so I feel like this time might be the one it sticks.

I really like the interface on WK and really hate the interface on Anki, so I've been avoiding building my own decks. I really prefer to type in answers as I feel it helps with retention, and while I've figured out how to do that on Anki, it's also frustrating that I can't figure out things that seem like they should be simple to me (like ignoring case sensitivity). Does anyone have any tips or resources to make Anki a little more palatable? My preferred workflow would be to enter new words on the desktop version and then doing reviews on mobile / tablet.
 

DassoBrother

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,059
Saskatchewan
I'd like to try to take N5 at some point, but probably not before December. I only started mid-December last year and it's been slow but steady. I started using Duolingo again but I'd like to buy maybe Genki I in the next month or two. If I was working with a workbook like Genki I figure I'd be more incentivized to use Anki and create my own cards.

I've got 20 lessons into Bunpro and I'm already having a bit of trouble. I should try to do more cram sessions maybe since I can do alright with reviews but I tried to cram everything I'd learned and suddenly had a lot more trouble. I'm still working on Wanikani too but have difficulty knowing when to use kun'yomi/on'yomi or modified hiragana for certain vocab. I rely decently on the mnemonics but I suppose that's the point.
 

Hypron

Member
Oct 27, 2017
3,684
NZ
After stagnating for what seems like forever due to life reasons I started making new cards again and watching more stuff. If I finish uni in June like I want to I'll sign up for N1 at the end of the year and study full time for it from July to December.
 

Megabyte

Member
Oct 25, 2017
38
Japan
Hey all, quick question. Is there any way to buy Japanese ebooks not on the Apple or Amazon Japan stores? I used to use my Amazon Japan account but it's not feasible for me anymore since I rely on the US account for uni textbooks. I did manage to buy the Japanese version of Harry Potter, and it doesn't have any restrictions. So I was wondering if there are other options like that.
 

Kurita

Member
Oct 26, 2017
4,379
Hey all, quick question. Is there any way to buy Japanese ebooks not on the Apple or Amazon Japan stores? I used to use my Amazon Japan account but it's not feasible for me anymore since I rely on the US account for uni textbooks. I did manage to buy the Japanese version of Harry Potter, and it doesn't have any restrictions. So I was wondering if there are other options like that.
I use booklive to buy Japanese mangas, they’ve got novels and all as well
 

meadowdrone

Member
Oct 27, 2017
183
UK
Just here to shamelessly brag that I passed the N4! I was prepared to fail and not be too down about it, but I'm super relieved and happy. I'll probably take my next JLPT in December too as my nearest site only does it once per year, but not sure if N3 is setting my sights too low for a year's study...
 

Reversed

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,751
Probably not gonna bother with N3 this year. I feel like this would create a lot of stress I'm not sure I can handle atm.
Certainly, going unprepared would wreck anyone's nerves in the exam, so it's best to study diligently until you feel ready for it. Personally, i've skipped 2 years because I haven't been studying for it, and that limbo isn't going to end until I fill in the study books. Some exam failure horror stories have turned me into a cautious person.
 

elyetis

Member
Oct 26, 2017
2,201
Dipping my toe into really learning japanese after having some fun with it on dualingo for two weeks. It was a nice feeling when I finaly got past the first wall, learning the hiragana/katakana, but after 3 days on wanikani I now realise how small of a step that was compared to learning radicals +Kanji + vocabulary.
Speaking of which, it was quite demoralizing to realise that learning a kanji and it's reading didn't actually mean you learned a word ( and to be honest at this point in time I don't really understand yet why it first make me learn that On’yomi reading, I can only guess it will make sense later ?).
 

JLateralus

Member
Oct 27, 2017
15
Dipping my toe into really learning japanese after having some fun with it on dualingo for two weeks. It was a nice feeling when I finaly got past the first wall, learning the hiragana/katakana, but after 3 days on wanikani I now realise how small of a step that was compared to learning radicals +Kanji + vocabulary.
Speaking of which, it was quite demoralizing to realise that learning a kanji and it's reading didn't actually mean you learned a word ( and to be honest at this point in time I don't really understand yet why it first make me learn that On’yomi reading, I can only guess it will make sense later ?).
When you get to vocab with multiple compound kanji, they typically (but not always!) use an on’yomi reading. It’s good to get them memorized for sure.