Let’s examine Homeopathic Medicine

Oct 28, 2017
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#7
Ahh yes, you mean snake oil?

I had a cold last month and my poor girlfriend had to run down the street to our local Whole Foods to pick me up something for my cough. It didn't improve in the slightest so on a whim I checked the bottle and lo and behold, it was Whole Foods branded homeopathy.

Haven't bought anything from them since and I don't plan on it until they reverse their policy.
 
Oct 27, 2017
561
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Bolton, UK, EU
#12
What’s the point of this post?

I’d say the point of the thread is to call out dangerous ignorance.
I first said fuck off to you because your post seemed to be in support of homeopathy and be a general discussion thread about it. I then clicked the link and saw I was wrong so edited. However this thread does nothing to call out dangerous ignorance. It just says it doesn't work (actually the post itself doesn't even bother to say that) without arguments or citations. Secondly this forum is overwhelmingly against homeopathy so you aren't even in the right place to call it out if you had actually bothered to.

Saying "bad thing is bad" on a discussion forum where virtually everyone agrees is completely pointless because there is no discussion to be had.
 
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ZealousD

Community Resettler
Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,133
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#17
I put a drop of aloe in the Pacific Ocean. By the literal rules of homeopathy, I have created the most potent & powerful medicine ever created.
Actually you didn't. That's pretty concentrated by homeopathy standards. You need to dilute it further.

(Not even kidding)
 
Oct 27, 2017
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The Netherlands
#19
Oil pulling, essential oils, herbal supplements, etc
Those aren't homeopathic, stuff based on herbs (herbalistm) and specific oils can help out in certain scenarios. To be fair, a big bunch of modern medicine has its roots in herbalism. But theyre often thrown in the same bracket with the homeopathic fake "diluted something 20198181818 times" shit.
 

ZealousD

Community Resettler
Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,133
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#23
"A popular homeopathic treatment for the flu is a 200C dilution of duck liver, marketed under the name Oscillococcinum. As there are only about 10^80 atoms in the entire observable universe, a dilution of one molecule in the observable universe would be about 40C. Oscillococcinum would thus require 10^320 times more atoms to simply have one molecule in the final substance."
 
Oct 25, 2017
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Munich
#24
Homeopathy uses "remedies" without any prove of having any positive medicinal effects. They chose the remedies based on an old pseudoscientific principle "Let likes cure likes". This is bullshit. These remedies are then diluted until its there is practically no chance of having even a single molecule of the remedy still in the solution, so its just water. This water is then put on small sugar balls and these few grams of sugar and water are then sold for a lot of money.

So even if the "Let likes cure likes" principle would work, which it doesn't, it still wouldn't work in homeopathy because its diluted until there are no physical remains of the "remedy", all you got left is sugar.

Homeopaths fix that problem by believing that water has memory and stores the medicinal information of the "remedy", even when there are no molecules of the remedy left.
So basically its a believe system. You have to believe in water having some form of unspecified memory to believe in homeopathy.
 
Oct 27, 2017
2,344
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The Netherlands
#26
"A popular homeopathic treatment for the flu is a 200C dilution of duck liver, marketed under the name Oscillococcinum. As there are only about 10^80 atoms in the entire observable universe, a dilution of one molecule in the observable universe would be about 40C. Oscillococcinum would thus require 10^320 times more atoms to simply have one molecule in the final substance."
Yep, now that is a nice example of the homeopathic principle.

Chewing down some valerian root to help you sleep isnt homeopathy
 
Oct 25, 2017
578
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#27
You really shouldn't confuse homeopathy and naturopathy. Both are equally bullshit, but it's a good practice to know what it is you are actually arguing against.

Also, people need to not underestimate just how prevalent this quackery is. Universities give a platform to these charlatans under the guise of integrative medicine, hiring naturopathic doctors and practitioners of Traditional Chinese Medicine despite the lack of any backing evidence.
 
Oct 25, 2017
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#30
The only argument for modern homeopathy is that “well, placebos can work to relieve symptoms sometimes.” But the hard reality is that way too many people buy expensive homeopathic remedies thinking it’ll cure them or legitimately fix issues. It doesn’t.
 
Nov 3, 2017
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#31
From what I've heard the one thing I'll give homeopathy is patient care.
The rest is hogwash but homeopathy practicians (I'm not calling them doctors) usually spend a lot more time with patients which could help recovery more than expected.
The rest is sugar lost in water.
 
Nov 3, 2017
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#33
The only argument for modern homeopathy is that “well, placebos can work to relieve symptoms sometimes.” But the hard reality is that way too many people buy expensive homeopathic remedies thinking it’ll cure them or legitimately fix issues.
Isn't that WHY the placebo effect works in some cases?
 
Oct 25, 2017
6,412
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twitter.com
#34
Notably, what you listed isn't homeopathy, but more generally "traditional" or "natural" medicine. Homeopathy refers specifically to the dilution of a particular substance in water to insanely low levels so as to "concentrate" it. And yes, that's exactly as ridiculous as it sounds.

At least traditional medicine has some theoretical mechanism of action, much as they usually don't work either. Homeopathy is literally just water,
 
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Oct 26, 2017
1,260
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#36
Looks at homeopathy. Looks like bullshit.

Wasn't hard.


It's start was an interesting hypothesis that had a reasonable argument for its mechanism. But when it was shown to be ineffective instead of abandoned the quacks soaked it up.