Let’s examine Homeopathic Medicine

Aug 1, 2018
729
It's not 'it MUST have been the last thing I took'. I see it as: 'I tried a whole lot of other stuff. That didn't work. I tried this, something changed.' Which makes me think there's a greater than zero percent chance the change came from the last thing I took. That's not a strange thing to think is it? Causality wise? As for the placebo part, wouldn't it make sense for that to have worked during the other treatments?
Personally, yes, it is strange. But for the majority of people? Probably not. But what other things happened that were different? That's the thing. Usually in these situations people don't properly analyze what was different during each treatment. There's less than a zero percent chance that it went away anyway. Why even attribute it to homeopathic "remedy"? Homeopathy is based on "like cures like". This isn't scientifically sound in any way. In fact, I've never heard of the mechanism by which this would work by homeopathic "doctors". As posted above, the dilution thing is hogwash.

Not necessarily. People respond differently to different things. The mind has a lot of power. In fact, being in a good place mentally helps immune response. If one believe this think might work because the others didn't, it might simply because of the mind.
 

Idde

Member
Oct 27, 2017
123
I have heard stories (from medical professionals witnessed by peers) of hypnotherapy treating warts. Horrifically bad ones, too. Essentially, something psychological triggers an immune response. I wonder if something similar happened.
Weeeell, I'm pretty sure I wasn't hypnotized. (Or wouldn't I remember if I was?). But yes, of course it's possible something happened mentally that made my warts go away. (For example) stress and the effects it has on the immune system can lead to a lot of different physical problems. Pretty cool and helpful hypnotherapy can have that effect.

But now we're substituting a possible (hypothetical?) psychological change for a homeopathic treatment?
 

Idde

Member
Oct 27, 2017
123
Personally, yes, it is strange. But for the majority of people? Probably not. But what other things happened that were different? That's the thing. Usually in these situations people don't properly analyze what was different during each treatment. There's less than a zero percent chance that it went away anyway. Why even attribute it to homeopathic "remedy"? Homeopathy is based on "like cures like". This isn't scientifically sound in any way. In fact, I've never heard of the mechanism by which this would work by homeopathic "doctors". As posted above, the dilution thing is hogwash.

Not necessarily. People respond differently to different things. The mind has a lot of power. In fact, being in a good place mentally helps immune response. If one believe this think might work because the others didn't, it might simply because of the mind.
Aaaah, I hate I'm having this conversation on my (Dutch) phone because my landlords internet decided to die today.

I completely understand (and agree) all scientific evidence points against homeopathy as the working agent in my case. And I have no clue how the supposed 'like cures like' effect is supposed to work or help. I agree with you.

But the reason I believe it could've is this: how incredibly unlikely must it be for the warts to disappear after the homeopathic treatment instead of after the time I used the ointment I got from the doctor? Or when I used a tincture from the pharmacy I used a couple of weeks? Or when they were burned away with ice? Or when they were cut away? And my feet were covered with them, and within a week they all disappeared.

It just seems more probable to me that the homeopathy did something, than that the warts naturally disappeared after I took the homeopathic stuff. And not after the aforementioned treatments.

Now it's true the homeopathic dude was way nicer than the regular doctor. And he didn't hurt me by burning my feet. But I was also extremely sceptical about it working. Because nothing had worked so far, and holding water in my mouth for thirty seconds would? Yeah right...
 
Last edited:
Oct 25, 2017
3,010
Aaaah, I hate I'm having this conversation on my (Dutch) phone because my landlords internet decided to die today.

I understand completely all scientific evidence points against homeopathy as the working agent in my case. But the reason I believe it could've been is this: how incredibly unlikely must it be for the warts to disappear after the homeopathic treatment instead of after the time I used the ointment I got from the doctor? Or when I used a tincture from the pharmacy I used a couple of weeks? Or when they were burned away with ice? Or when they were cut away? And my feet were covered with them, and within a week they all disappeared.

It just seems more probable to me that the homeopathy did something, than that the warts naturally disappeared after I took the homeopathic stuff. And not after the aforementioned treatments.

Now it's true the homeopathic dude was way nicer than the regular doctor. And he didn't hurt me by burning my feet. But I was also extremely sceptical about it working. Because nothing had worked so far, and holding water in my mouth for thirty seconds would? Yeah right...
We have double blind studies for this very reason.
 

Idde

Member
Oct 27, 2017
123
We have double blind studies for this very reason.
Yes. And those double blind studies most likely proved the regular treatments to be effective. Which they weren't.

But I agree. Until we use time travel to see if my warts also disappeared in an alternative timeline where I didn't take the homeopathic stuff (which would be an excellent use of time travel) double blind studies are the best things we got.
 
Oct 25, 2017
3,010
Remember that medicine at an individual level is an inexact science at most. There is a reason why most doctors would recommend ibufropen and rest first the first time you come in with a slight fever a headache even if the ultimate cause is some rare disease.

Your warts could have went away on thier own even without the treatments that you put your body through and that's a perfectly normal response.
 
Jul 18, 2018
500
The scents from the essential oils doe is like my coffee since i don't drink it, gives me that boost even if its all in the mind
That orange scent just makes me grind when doing work related stuff and that lemongrass scent just relaxes me if i want to nap
 
Oct 22, 2018
1,210
The scents from the essential oils doe is like my coffee since i don't drink it, gives me that boost even if its all in the mind
That orange scent just makes me grind when doing work related stuff and that lemongrass scent just relaxes me if i want to nap
I mean, liking a scent is different from expecting lavender oil to cure pancreatic cancer. Being in a good mood has fairly obvious and straightforward health benefits.