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London Bridge terror incident: suspect shot dead by police after five injured [update: two members of public dead]

Audioboxer

Banned
Nov 14, 2019
1,861
I don't know if it's been posted already but apparently this guy asked to be deradicilised but got nothing from the probation service.
The comment so far isn't he asked, but was required to as part of his automatic release

As part of his release conditions, Khan was obliged to take part in the government's desistance and disengagement programme - the purpose of which is the rehabilitation of people who have been involved in terrorism.

The Parole Board said it had no involvement in the 28-year-old's release, saying he "appears to have been released automatically on licence (as required by law)".

After leaving prison he had moved into a Stafford property on the "approved premises" list.
The attack began at 13:58 GMT on Friday at Fishmongers' Hall, at the north end of London Bridge, at a Cambridge University conference on prisoner rehabilitation.

The Learning Together scheme, which featured in the BBC's Law in Action programme earlier this year, allows university students and prisoners to study alongside each other.

Khan had been one of dozens of people at the event.

It's a failing of the justice system that people who aren't ready to be released get out automatically.

The beginning of deradicalisation has to happen behind bars, not some social experiment where you let extremists back out with an ankle bracelet and say to the public you'll try and deradicalise them then.

If they don't show improvement in prison then they shouldn't get out. The risks are too high when we talk about extremists to this degree.
 

null

Member
Oct 25, 2017
6,443
That definitely needs sourcing.
I don't think it's true because if you look at the appeal I posted on the last page (section 49)

Turning to the issue of dangerousness, none of the defendants had resiled from the views expressed in their defence case statements although Chowdhury, Shah Rahman, Khan, Shahjahan and Hussain had written letters of repentance and Desai had shown an interest in attending a de-radicalisation programme while in custody.
only one of the group had shown interest in de-radicalisation while in custody and it wasn't Khan.

edit: there could've been more when he were let out on license though. If that's the case there it's definitely a failure of the probation service.
 
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SMD

Member
Oct 28, 2017
5,092
I don't think it's true because if you look at the appeal I posted on the last page (section 49)



only one of the group had shown interest in de-radicalisation while in custody and it wasn't Khan.

edit: there could've been more when he was let out on license though. If that's the case there it's definitely a failure of the probation service.
Thanks, I thought that even by the probation service's standards, it would be a massive failing if someone wanted a deradicalisation programme and was denied before committing such an awful crime.
 

kmag

Member
Nov 5, 2017
2,199
Thanks, I thought that even by the probation service's standards, it would be a massive failing if someone wanted a deradicalisation programme and was denied before committing such an awful crime.
He did request deradicalisation In 2016 the requesting letter has been published by itv


 

Audioboxer

Banned
Nov 14, 2019
1,861
He did request deradicalisation In 2016 the requesting letter has been published by itv


Oh well, there is the proof he did.

Sounds like bedlem in our prisons if they aren't attempting to deradicalise and/or are letting people out that are still threats.

The blood of the two deaths could be on the chain of command that let this man back out and/or didn't deal with him properly in prison.

Even if the guy was chatting shit (lying), it's on the professionals to know that.

edit -

 
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SMD

Member
Oct 28, 2017
5,092
He did request deradicalisation In 2016 the requesting letter has been published by itv


Apologies. Here's the link.


Edit* Didn't see that post above!
Holy fuck that's just disgusting.
 

NeonCarbon

Member
Oct 28, 2017
691
It just seems very tricky and sad when it comes to deradicalisation, and will never be foolproof or always last forever.
 
Oct 27, 2017
1,710
Thanks, I thought that even by the probation service's standards, it would be a massive failing if someone wanted a deradicalisation programme and was denied before committing such an awful crime.
So what happens: after a few sessions they pronounce that you are deradicalised? Is that even a word?

So now, a few councilor sessions is enough to convince people that they are no longer a threat to society?

“Really your honor, I didn’t want to kill those people. But because nobody told me that I was no longer radicalized, I thought that I had too. You see your honor, it is the system that failed here. People like me that have no problem killing innocents just need to be deradicalised”.. “a quick reboot to zero if you will”
 

SMD

Member
Oct 28, 2017
5,092
So what happens: after a few sessions they pronounce that you are deradicalised? Is that even a word?

So now, a few councilor sessions is enough to convince people that they are no longer a threat to society?

“Really your honor, I didn’t want to kill those people. But because nobody told me that I was no longer radicalized, I thought that I had too. You see your honor, it is the system that failed here. People like me that have no problem killing innocents just need to be deradicalised”.. “a quick reboot to zero if you will”
If you're asking me about deradicalisation, you're better off either asking a professional or doing your own research.

If you're asking me about the role of the system, they should be assessing these prisoners before release. If the prisoner themselves asks for a programme and doesn't receive it, what exactly does that say about the people in charge?
 
Oct 27, 2017
1,710
If you're asking me about deradicalisation, you're better off either asking a professional or doing your own research.

If you're asking me about the role of the system, they should be assessing these prisoners before release. If the prisoner themselves asks for a programme and doesn't receive it, what exactly does that say about the people in charge?
Sorry I should not have quoted you as I wasn’t singling you out.
 
Oct 27, 2017
1,710
So now the people need someone else to convince them that it is wrong to kill innocents for no reason.

Perhaps I should ask for a program to convince me not to rob a bank. Then when I don’t get it, use it as a defense if I unsuccessfully try to rob one.

Sounds like a great get out of jail free card
 

SMD

Member
Oct 28, 2017
5,092
So now the people need someone else to convince them that it is wrong to kill innocents for no reason.

Perhaps I should ask for a program to convince me not to rob a bank. Then when I don’t get it, use it as a defense if I unsuccessfully try to rob one.

Sounds like a great get out of jail free card
You do realise you say this when a large proportion of the country have been radicalised, right?
 
Oct 27, 2017
1,710
You do realise you say this when a large proportion of the country have been radicalised, right?
?? So our problems can go away with a few therapy sessions! Got it. The whole " He asked for deradicalisation course" sounds like deflection bullshit. Unless people are that stupid that they need someone to tell them that killing is wrong...
 

Puroresu_kid

Member
Oct 28, 2017
4,739
I don't know if it's been posted already but apparently this guy asked to be deradicilised but got nothing from the probation service.
Goes with what I posted earlier. That kind of rehab costs money and I just don't see a British goverment prepared to go all in with that.

I'm not sure why people in the thread want to shit on people becoming deradicilised? There has to be a start somewhere and rehabilitation should be the core behind prison sentences.

Terrorist or not eventually they will get released and you either want an angry person coming out or a changed person. I'll go with the changed person.
 

Blent

Member
Oct 26, 2017
2,213
East Midlands, England, UK
I literally do not understand how ordinary people can be that brave.

At the first sign of anything like that, I would've legged it as far away, as quickly as possible.

It's utterly astonishing to me how much courage those people had.
 

P-MAC

Member
Nov 15, 2017
2,371
Goes with what I posted earlier. That kind of rehab costs money and I just don't see a British goverment prepared to go all in with that.

I'm not sure why people in the thread want to shit on people becoming deradicilised? There has to be a start somewhere and rehabilitation should be the core behind prison sentences.

Terrorist or not eventually they will get released and you either want an angry person coming out or a changed person. I'll go with the changed person.
Exactly, never understand this either. Even if it’s only successful part of the time that’s still worthwhile.


Salute to Lukasz
 

Doom_Bringer

Banned
Oct 31, 2017
2,586
User banned (3 months): Racism and xenophobia
what a loser...

they need to deport these fuckers back to their terrorist land, no second chances
 

Prine

Member
Oct 25, 2017
7,262
?? So our problems can go away with a few therapy sessions! Got it. The whole " He asked for deradicalisation course" sounds like deflection bullshit. Unless people are that stupid that they need someone to tell them that killing is wrong...
He didn't always think this, something happened, we need to understand why to create/update preventative frameworks from infecting others. We feel it's ok to kill, for instance a man like Usman Khan, terrorist, we (mostly) felt he had to be put down, imagine being so disconnected from reality that a man like him felt the same validation we do internally with those around him, these fanatics often bring up a list of (ridiculous) quasi justifications for thier perspective. It's more complex then saying it's obvious, that only works when we're synchronised to reason with the same set of rules.

what a loser...

they need to deport these fuckers back to their terrorist land, no second chances
We don't deport other serious offenders of violence/rape/pedophilia if they're our citizens, he's born, raised and radicalised here.
 

sangreal

Member
Oct 25, 2017
4,924
Apologies. Here's the link.


Edit* Didn't see that post above!
That article says he went through the program, starting in 2014

ITV News understands that Khan was invited to do a “risk assessment and formulation” in 2012, while in Category A HMP Belmarsh - the first step of a deradicalisation programme.

However, it is understood that Khan repeatedly refused the risk assessment test and formulation, a process which would have been taking place before he wrote the letter.

Eventually, in 2014, he seemed to change his mind and went ahead with the risk assessment and formulation and was then on a programme most likely continuously until the end of the custodial part of sentence.
 

Kuma Bear

Member
Oct 27, 2017
4,323
Japan
what a loser...

they need to deport these fuckers back to their terrorist land, no second chances
I knew this would happen. I'm sure you're not alone in thinking that and that many people will vote conservatives as a result of this because to do so would be to ensure Brexit which involves "taking control of our borders".

What this criminal did was kill 2 people but it doesn't stop there, he's turning people against immigration and it's going to make the lives of minority groups harder. The effects of this man's actions are far reaching and it might even go beyond the borders of the UK.