Mechanics in games that had the exact opposite results of their intended design

d3ckard

Member
Dec 7, 2017
144
Its not about hoarding, its about the lack of progression. Not only does links moveset and abilities not really progress, but the enemies and weapons have a faux progression where they both just get better stats and colour changes. It felt like a true sandbox in the sense that it doesn't matter what you do because ultimately everything is still just sand. Once you see those gears turning you're just going to avoid fighting enemies altogether like many people have stated.
The only reason to avoid fighting enemies is to save weapons, which is pointless. You are supposed to play with them, burn through them and collect new ones, and there are always plenty. I usually prefer swords in games and in BotW I had to deal with that and use what I had - and it felt awesome. Lack of feeling of progression might be due to a low amount of permanent collectibles which is an issue, but the weapon system itself was really cool.
 

lvl 99 Pixel

Member
Oct 25, 2017
18,352
The only reason to avoid fighting enemies is to save weapons, which is pointless. You are supposed to play with them, burn through them and collect new ones, and there are always plenty. I usually prefer swords in games and in BotW I had to deal with that and use what I had - and it felt awesome. Lack of feeling of progression might be due to a low amount of permanent collectibles which is an issue, but the weapon system itself was really cool.
The reason to avoid fighting is because its pointless when its just more of the same endless loot loop vs the same enemy types, which is ends up being most of the time. Once you have seen the few weapon movesets you have seen the extent of the combat outside of using the games physics engine, which doesn't really need the weapons in the first place.
 

d3ckard

Member
Dec 7, 2017
144
The reason to avoid fighting is because its pointless when its just more of the same endless loot loop vs the same enemy types, which is ends up being most of the time. Once you have seen the few weapon movesets you have seen the extent of the combat outside of using the games physics engine, which doesn't really need the weapons in the first place.
That can be said about pretty much every open world game. The topic is about mechanics that don’t work and I’m arguing this mechanics works perfectly, it’s just some people do not enjoy it.
 

Smartlord

Member
Oct 27, 2017
72
One of the bigger issues with BOTW's durability system imo is that once you
get the Master Sword
, they just gave me a single infinite use item in a game full of breakable stuff. It is supposed to be an empowering heroic weapon, but ends up being my mundane pickaxe, wood axe, and general blunt tool since I don't need to waste a slot on those. Similarly, I'd just use it in fights, and flee if the thing ran out of juice.
 

hwarang

Member
Oct 27, 2017
672

Game was supposed to be a simple, but fun action game. The introduction of K-style through "created" mechanics led to some crazy paced matches.

Propelled the game's success and made it even more fun. Surprised it wasn't mentioned.
 

lvl 99 Pixel

Member
Oct 25, 2017
18,352
That can be said about pretty much every open world game. The topic is about mechanics that don’t work and I’m arguing this mechanics works perfectly, it’s just some people do not enjoy it.
Not really, most of them have a skill and weapon progression system and introduce new, tougher enemies as you progress. I don't particularly like Open World games for the repetition and iterative content, but BOTW in particular felt like going in circles outside of the more significant content.
 

impingu1984

Member
Oct 31, 2017
1,735
UK
Oh wait! I've got a better one!

The fucking leveling system in TESIV: Oblivion

You level up by picking key skills and leveling them up, and they probably intended for you to pick your most used skils as key skills. But because the scaling is so fucked, the best way to play that game was to pick your least used skills as key skills and only level up when you got the max benefits of it. So a Mage's key skills would be stuff like Hand-to-Hand and big weapons, while a Warrior's key skills would be stuff like Illusion magic.
You missed out the fun bits like having to stand in a corner and spam magic spells to level up or swimming into a corner for hours on end to level athletic skill etc

Was going to post this.... The oblivionxp mod at least fixes this by completely dumping the entire leveling system
 

Bit_Reactor

Member
Apr 9, 2019
2,890
The Blade system in Xenoblade 2. The Blades are basically beings that fight alongside you and give you a weapon to fight with. There's a number of unique characters that are Blades and a slew of generic ones. Basically, acquiring these Blades becomes like a gacha mobile game as you open up cores and different unique blades have a certain percentage of a chance of coming out.

I recall the devs saying they did it this way because they wanted players to have different experiences based on the Blades they got and share who they got on social media with each other. They wanted it to be a surprise or something when you got a new unique Blade. While the idea is cool and all, it mainly just lead to people grinding to get all of the Blades and sharing them was a bit pointless considering the devs showed off every Blade before release.

I think the weapon durability actually gave me more reason to explore. The fact that my weapons broke gave value to any new weapon I could find. If anything, being able to keep all the best weapons would have made finding other weapons less rewarding. Like "Oh, there's a fire sword in this chest. But I got a fire sword hours ago..."
To Xenoblade 2, I agree. The system itself once you have everything is just effing amazing. It's a ridiculously varied toolkit to play with. But the trudge to get blades to the right people (originally taking an item that was hard as hell to find meaning you could pop the wrong blade by the wrong driver and not be able to play with the amazing builds they open up) and the fact that blades were objectively better than others ruined it.

Torna rebalanced this and made it better, but the answer to the blades in XB2 Vanilla would have been having similar blades but just different elements, instead locking power behind gacha. My brain goes to a timeline in which this was money walled and I shudder to think of what the game would have been.

The gacha system has to be only skins/designs to work, if it's actual power it all falls apart. That's why I hope we get a base set like Torna in the next game if they do something similar (I liked controlling 9 party members at once) and then gacha blades on the side to vary it up. Things like Valkyrie Profile 2 where each sword was one of three sword wielders and it was random which person you got was a better implementation of this.

And agreed on BOTW. It became involved. I marked places on the map where I knew good weapons were, I'd know where to lead my gf to if she was looking for certain items for cooking and certain elements. It was great to me. But I know a lot of people don't like it at this point.


Not really, most of them have a skill and weapon progression system and introduce new, tougher enemies as you progress. I don't particularly like Open World games for the repetition and iterative content, but BOTW in particular felt like going in circles outside of the more significant content.
Nah Mechanically it works as intended for a bunch of people.

The carrot on stick mentality has been ingrained in most games that the idea of player strength versus avatar strength has become a foreign one. Instead of levelling up your weapons you level up as you explore and find new things to play with. Anyone who's made it to endgame or got through the game vouches for swimming in weapons outside of master mode gold enemy encounters, which, to me, is the system working exactly as it should, by having the player get better and better with the surroundings and enemy encounters and the systems they can manipulate to handle the gameplay, with the rest being exporation for exploration sake.

I agree some more variety and enemy types that need certain weapons could vary it up for the next go, but the system works as intended 9 times out of 10, it's just that 10% of the users don't like it.

Progression systems and skill level ups are, for all intents and purposes, fake progression because you didn't get "better" you just filled a meter for access to a shiny new thing to use. The benefit of BOTW is that you have access to all your skills from the getgo and all the weapons from the getgo if you know where to go meaning that your progression is intrinsically tied to your own exploration and gameplay.

I love me some level up systems and skill builds in games like turn based combat and stuff, but in a game like BOTW if it pulled some stupid level gating crap or gave you unbreakable weapons or made "skill unlocks" a thing to grind towards, a huge core of the gameplay loop would be broken.
 
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Syysch

Member
Oct 30, 2017
287
Shadow Madness on hard mode

What they want : "award the player by giving them move xp, because yeah thing are harder"
What happen : "Hit level cap before disk 2, everything is a cakewalk...."
Dragon's Dogma is kinda like this, xp and discipline xp are doubled, which I felt more than offset the increase in difficulty, at least once you get a little ways in and can take advantage of the faster leveling.
 

Moirayn

Member
Nov 7, 2018
1,164
In old Maddens (16 bit, etc) this was the trick of calling a run up the middle, and then running to the outside. The defensive logic was based on what your playcall was, so if you called a HB Dive, and then sprinted to the sidelines, you'd generally outrun almost all of the defenders for a 10 or 20 yard gain.
This is how I annihilated opponents in the NCAA Football games in the Gamecube/PS2/Xbox generation so I think it was still in the game at that time. I had no idea what caused it, but I knew it worked lol.
 
Feb 21, 2019
1,068
I think the weapon durability actually gave me more reason to explore. The fact that my weapons broke gave value to any new weapon I could find. If anything, being able to keep all the best weapons would have made finding other weapons less rewarding. Like "Oh, there's a fire sword in this chest. But I got a fire sword hours ago..."
To me, nothing was special about it. Basically "exploring for ammo" just didn't work for me. I understand others like it. Thats cool. Maybe the next game keeps the system. Maybe it doesnt. I don't think it adds anything to the game by making all the weapons brittle.
 

Cokie Bear

Banned
Oct 27, 2017
4,944
Not sure if this counts as intended or not, but in old football manager games I’d create a second profile and “manage” wherever team my main team was playing against, and move all the players to the side of the pitch so my main team always ended up with a 10+ goal win.
 

Glio

Member
Oct 27, 2017
9,541
Spain
To me, nothing was special about it. Basically "exploring for ammo" just didn't work for me. I understand others like it. Thats cool. Maybe the next game keeps the system. Maybe it doesnt. I don't think it adds anything to the game by making all the weapons brittle.
If the weapons were not breakable, the so open BOTW map would make you go as soon as you start to Hyrule Castle, kill a strong enemy using physics, steal his absurdly OP sword and that would make the rest of the game trivial.
 

Cokie Bear

Banned
Oct 27, 2017
4,944
If the weapons were not breakable, the so open BOTW map would make you go as soon as you start to Hyrule Castle, kill a strong enemy using physics, steal his absurdly OP sword and that would make the rest of the game trivial.
How would it? How is someone supposed to know where the best weapons are the first time they’re playing the game? Why can’t they be locked behind difficult puzzles, challenges or optional boss encounters? BOTW isn’t a difficult game as is but there’s definitely ways they could keep the open aspect of the game without having weapons break 2-3 times per encounter.

Like, how do you know what a player could do in a hypothetical game that doesn’t exist?
 
Feb 21, 2019
1,068
If the weapons were not breakable, the so open BOTW map would make you go as soon as you start to Hyrule Castle, kill a strong enemy using physics, steal his absurdly OP sword and that would make the rest of the game trivial.
Its not the first game to have this problem. Other games have been "open" and addressed this. We will see what Nintendo does with the next one regarding this. Maybe they will keep the system, maybe they wont. I can see why some folks like it, but I have to admit, its just not for me.
 

EloKa

GSP
Verified
Oct 25, 2017
996
Warcraft 3 towers. They were intended to be used to defend yourself but instead were used to wall-in your enemy - accidentally creating the Tower Defense genre.

Bonus points for the combo system in Street Fighter and GTA in general. Both were created because the prototypes had bugs.
 
OP
OP
Kaguya

Kaguya

Member
Jun 19, 2018
3,356
If the weapons were not breakable, the so open BOTW map would make you go as soon as you start to Hyrule Castle, kill a strong enemy using physics, steal his absurdly OP sword and that would make the rest of the game trivial.
This isn't really a problem and the game can easily be balanced around it. This is how things works in some Souls and a lot other games, if anything, these type of stuff encourage repeated play throughs and make them more fun.
 
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lvl 99 Pixel

Member
Oct 25, 2017
18,352
You could easily solve some of BOTW's progression stagnancy by scaling the difficulty and complexity of shrines and adding new enemies as you progress, but instead it feels like its all over the place with shrines and enemy mobs just get more hp and dps. You will encounter trash mobs and joke shrines 40 hours into the game.
 

Funyarinpa

Avenger
Oct 26, 2017
9,943
The reason to avoid fighting is because its pointless when its just more of the same endless loot loop vs the same enemy types, which is ends up being most of the time. Once you have seen the few weapon movesets you have seen the extent of the combat outside of using the games physics engine, which doesn't really need the weapons in the first place.
The real issue isn't weapon breakage -- it's the lack of any meaningful structure, pace or progression to the weapons you find, and a similar lack of development when it comes to enemies. You fight Bokoblins from the word 'go' and you're fighting Bokoblins 85 hours in.

You could give me fifteen wonderful weapons and it'd get boring, with a setup like that.

Stal enemies and such should've been relegated to mini-areas, there should've been actual unique enemies in every zone beyond wildlife and elemental variants, and walking around at hour 70 should feel different from walking around at hour 10, 20 or 40.

I'm 85 hours into BotW and really enjoy it somehow, but by GOD it's perhaps the most flawed single player game I've spent more than 50 hours with.
 

TC McQueen

Member
Oct 27, 2017
1,772
Here's a real bad one:
In the Valkyria Chronicles series, missions are scored based on how long it takes to complete the objectives (capturing enemy camps), rather than clearing out the enemies.

Intended behavior: Encourage players to utilize the tactical tools provided to greatest effect.
Actually behavior: Encourage players to abuse high mobility units to bypass threats to reach the final camp and end the mission.

Also, the mission design tends to suffer because the higher difficulty missions are just basically putting super units in the path of the player's unit to prevent cheese.
 

Defect

Member
Oct 25, 2017
3,850
Weapon bloom in Halo Reach. Intended for people to pace their shots but spamming was actually the real way to play the game. So thanks for the rng Bungie!
 
Nov 17, 2017
9,040
To me, nothing was special about it. Basically "exploring for ammo" just didn't work for me. I understand others like it. Thats cool. Maybe the next game keeps the system. Maybe it doesnt. I don't think it adds anything to the game by making all the weapons brittle.
That’s fair. To me it solved the problem of never finding anything useful when exploring in Zelda games. No more finding a chest of ruppees you don’t need in every chest.

It also added some organic unpredictability to the game. My load out was always different and so with the variety of situations you can find yourself in by exploring what I could do was always different depending on what I had. I wasn’t handling every encounter with the same tried and true set up and that, at least for me, kept things fresh and fun for however long I played.
 

Jer

Member
Oct 27, 2017
1,106
Tripping in Brawl

Intended design: haha, oops I tripped! Having a grand old time here laughing with my pals! What a silly game, and what a silly time we're having.

Reality: fuck this random bullshit



was fixed immediately with the next Smash, thankfully.
I think it had the desired effect. It was meant to discourage competitive play, and it certainly did just that! The desired effect was unbelievably stupid, no doubt, but it worked as intended.
 

Starlatine

Member
Oct 28, 2017
12,009
Warcraft 3 towers. They were intended to be used to defend yourself but instead were used to wall-in your enemy - accidentally creating the Tower Defense genre.
isnt this most RTSes? i know i made gigantic walls of several watchtowers in Total Annihilation Kingdoms because it was cheap
 

UnluckyKate

Member
Oct 25, 2017
3,385
Elder Scrolls skill up by usage.

You just end up casting shit randomly to empty your mana when traveling for a few skill up in illusion or destruction magic.

Same in oblivion with jumping around to gain agility...

Or stay in flames and keep casting healing and chung on mana potion... its pretty bad
 
Jan 21, 2019
1,260
Weapon degradation in Breath of the Wild. Encourage me to use more weapons? Nope! I've got an inventory full of good stuff and will run from every mob until I encounter something "worthy" of using these great weapons on.
This soured my experience with the game. I avoided combat because I didn't want to waste my shiny stuff on random mobs.

Fucking hoarder brain of mine.
 

Starlatine

Member
Oct 28, 2017
12,009
Elder Scrolls skill up by usage.

You just end up casting shit randomly to empty your mana when traveling for a few skill up in illusion or destruction magic.

Same in oblivion with jumping around to gain agility...

Or stay in flames and keep casting healing and chung on mana potion... its pretty bad
Theory - the more you smith the better you get at smithing! by trying new and harder stuff, your skill improves during your adventure
Practice - get to the first smithing place you find and craft thousands and thousands of daggers for easy quick xp
 

Swiggins

Member
Apr 10, 2018
3,123
Elder Scrolls skill up by usage.

You just end up casting shit randomly to empty your mana when traveling for a few skill up in illusion or destruction magic.

Same in oblivion with jumping around to gain agility...

Or stay in flames and keep casting healing and chung on mana potion... its pretty bad
Honestly I love the idea of a system where you level skills depending on their usage, but it's sooooo poorly implemented.

Theory - the more you smith the better you get at smithing! by trying new and harder stuff, your skill improves during your adventure
Practice - get to the first smithing place you find and craft thousands and thousands of daggers for easy quick xp
That's not even accounting for the fact that Smithing, Alchemy and Enchanting are the three best skills in the game (and it's not even close) and they're also the three skills in the game that require absolutely no combat.
 

Tuorom

Member
Oct 30, 2017
2,958
Capcom vs SNK 2 had roll-cancels which allowed for invincible moves. The roll ability was supposed to help you dodge through certain attacks but it turned out you could cancel rolls directly into moves and the moves would retain the invincible frames.


This might be a stretch but the cover system in Gears of War was designed to slam you into cover from which you would shoot but players use it to move around the map rapidly and dodge shotgun blasts.
Not a stretch at all. That tech completely changed the game. And these are actually really cool "happy mistakes" as Bob Ross would say. I can't imagine Gears without the wall surfing haha.
The Ultimate Technique in Ninja Gaiden, specifically Ninja Gaiden 2, is an incredibly powerful, devastating combo attack that makes Hayabusa fully invincible, but requires brutally long charge up time where you're stock still and vulnerable to the game's incredibly dangerous and swift enemies. However, killing even a couple of enemies in a fight leaves their essence (item shop and upgrade currency) floating around, and charging a UT has Hayabusa automatically absorbing the essence. This leads to UTs being charged up pretty much instantly. Instead of it being a satisfying risk/reward venture the player needs to think carefully about, it becomes an abusable tactic to be used as often as possible, and pretty much can't be ignored on higher difficulties. It's especially prevalent since a ridiculous amount of boss fights also include minions, so even the dramatic boss fights aren't totally excluded from planning your routine around using UTs as often as possible instead of playing the game "properly" (though UTs are far less effective against bosses at least).
You also won't absorb essence while holding block so you can do on-landing UTs! You hold block and roll and jump around and once you find a nice spot you jump, wait until you are almost landed, release block, hold Y, and boom! UT all in your enemies face instantly.

I think it might have been intended though since blocking does prevent essence absorption so you can UT when you need to.
 
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OP
OP
Kaguya

Kaguya

Member
Jun 19, 2018
3,356
Just remembered another one, Uncharted 3 auto fire while running(firing without aiming), obviously meant to be a last resort when you need the mobility ended up being the strongest thing in the game, running at people trying to aim with a controller and watching them die before you(mobility also made it hard to aim at you) was hilarious. Of course it got patched pretty fast but that was the most fun I had with an Uncharted multiplayer.
 

Nakenorm

The Fallen
Oct 26, 2017
5,946
Sweden
Not really what OP is talking about, but I always thought that being able to toss back grenades in Uncharted 3 was such a dumb design choice.
Uncharted to me has always been about movement but giving you the option to toss back grenades just encourages you to stay put behind cover like in most cover based shooters.

It's something that they probably realized themselves because in 4 they added even more mobility options and introduced lots of more destructible cover, as well as took out the ability to toss back grenades.
 

Syysch

Member
Oct 30, 2017
287
Warcraft 3 towers. They were intended to be used to defend yourself but instead were used to wall-in your enemy - accidentally creating the Tower Defense genre.
Reminds me of the original Command & Conquer. Instead of defending yourself with the sandbag walls, you just built a line of walls to the enemy base and locked them in, because the AI wouldn't target them.
 

Kahoots

Member
Feb 15, 2018
657
It’s the fact that by making weapons, and by extension most “loot” that you find, fleeting and ephemeral, it guts the desire for exploration. Why explore when you know 90% of the time it will be another temporary weapon that you’ve likely already seen before and will burn through as quickly as it took to get it. The only thing worthwhile is armor and it is *very* few and far between.
Yeah, exploring was so much better back when the rewards were chests of rupees.
 

Easy_D

Member
Oct 28, 2017
1,919
There's a ring in Faxanadu meant to boost your attack power permanently when you pick it up.

It does the opposite. They mixed the values up so you start with the bonus damage.

However you can skip it lol
 

lvl 99 Pixel

Member
Oct 25, 2017
18,352
Yeah, exploring was so much better back when the rewards were chests of rupees.
Rupees and heart pieces were always boring but your exploration was more about traversing very distinct dungeons, with new enemies and bosses, new gear to use and the stories surrounding each area. That and the metroidvania type feeling of remembering a previously inaccessible area being viable with the new tools you acquire is completely gone.
 

Stoze

Member
Oct 26, 2017
1,531
Giving you exp for doing actions in Deus Ex HR. This is supposed to reward the player regardless of what path they choose to approach things in, but instead it entices the player to take as many paths as possible and/or the "best" paths. This is because some actions give more exp than others and some can be stacked. Like if I had a keycard to a room and a password to that computer in that room, I would still take the vent and hack both the door and the computer anyways because it gave more exp.

I can't remember if they balanced it better in Mankind Divided, but typically I don't think exp should be given out in that fashion in an immersive sim.
 

Flon

Member
Oct 27, 2017
660
The developers of Super Smash Bros. Brawl appeared to have wanted easier low percent combos but to remove them starting at mid percent, so for low knockback states they removed the ability for an opponent to influence their launch direction, and then added a near instant hitstun cancel mechanic for knockback states that launch the opponent.

They also wanted players to not rely on using the same move over and over, so they really strengthened the power of move staleness where it grows far weaker with each use.

These two combined caused chain-throws and juggles on certain characters that can even lead to KO's, as the throw/attack stays so weak that it can chain into itself yet still prevent them from launching, and the opponent isn't able to manipulate their launch trajectory to get out like in Melee.
 

timedesk

Member
Oct 27, 2017
2,047
Giving you exp for doing actions in Deus Ex HR. This is supposed to reward the player regardless of what path they choose to approach things in, but instead it entices the player to take as many paths as possible and/or the "best" paths. This is because some actions give more exp than others and some can be stacked. Like if I had a keycard to a room and a password to that computer in that room, I would still take the vent and hack both the door and the computer anyways because it gave more exp.

I can't remember if they balanced it better in Mankind Divided, but typically I don't think exp should be given out in that fashion in an immersive sim.
I definitely did this in both games. I hacked pretty much every door and computer, even if I had the code already. I personally enjoyed it, but I can see how it was a kind of flawed system.
 

Jakisthe

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,784
I definitely did this in both games. I hacked pretty much every door and computer, even if I had the code already. I personally enjoyed it, but I can see how it was a kind of flawed system.
The stealth/combat system too. You could do four ways of engaging enemies:
-Stealth KO: Mercy XP, Stealth XP, Ghost XP bonus at the end, no equipment needed, all at no risk to the player beyond a recharging battery since it was a pre-canned animation.
-Stealth Kill: Stealth XP, Ghost bonus at the end, no equipment needed, all at no risk to the player beyond the recharging battery.
-Ranged KO: Mercy XP, Stealth XP, Ghost XP bonus at the end, but takes bulky equipment and non-recurring ammo.
-Ranged Kill: Killing XP, takes bulky equipment and uses non-recurring ammo, puts the player in harms way

Essentially, the Stealth KO option uniformly gave the most XP, took the least resources, had the least risk, and no real downsides besides "get close". I assume it was designed like that to punish players from being too lethal and just blasting through everyone, but it was a serious over-correction and made using guns - of which there were tons - almost entirely pointless.
 

timedesk

Member
Oct 27, 2017
2,047
The stealth/combat system too. You could do four ways of engaging enemies:
-Stealth KO: Mercy XP, Stealth XP, Ghost XP bonus at the end, no equipment needed, all at no risk to the player beyond a recharging battery since it was a pre-canned animation.
-Stealth Kill: Stealth XP, Ghost bonus at the end, no equipment needed, all at no risk to the player beyond the recharging battery.
-Ranged KO: Mercy XP, Stealth XP, Ghost XP bonus at the end, but takes bulky equipment and non-recurring ammo.
-Ranged Kill: Killing XP, takes bulky equipment and uses non-recurring ammo, puts the player in harms way

Essentially, the Stealth KO option uniformly gave the most XP, took the least resources, had the least risk, and no real downsides besides "get close". I assume it was designed like that to punish players from being too lethal and just blasting through everyone, but it was a serious over-correction and made using guns - of which there were tons - almost entirely pointless.
The games really should have evened out the xp distribution. I loved ghosting levels, but the reward should not have been so much higher then fighting your way through them. Especially because high level stealth augments actually made stealth easier then fighting in some ways. The games really really needed to boost combat XP.
 

En-ou

Member
Oct 27, 2017
999
User Warned: Hostility
Weapon degradation in Breath of the Wild. Encourage me to use more weapons? Nope! I've got an inventory full of good stuff and will run from every mob until I encounter something "worthy" of using these great weapons on.
Was looking for this post, didn’t take long.

You piling them up is your own dumbass fault.
You’d think you’d learn since as you progress you keep getting more...but Hey let me play an arcade game as if it was a simulator then complain when it doesn’t jive.
 

Poimandres

Member
Oct 26, 2017
3,059
Was looking for this post, didn’t take long.

You piling them up is your own dumbass fault.
You’d think you’d learn since as you progress you keep getting more...but Hey let me play an arcade game as if it was a simulator then complain when it doesn’t jive.
Calling someone a "dumb ass" for having a different experience with a game mechanic to you is pretty rude. Most of the mechanics in this thread can work as intended for a lot of people... But for others they have an unintended consequence. There's no right or wrong way to play a game. You can defend something without resorting to insulting people.
 

WedgeX

Member
Oct 27, 2017
5,691
Starseige: Tribes feels like a great example of this.

Instead of jumping, the act of jumping helps you continue to fall.
 

HK-47

Member
Oct 25, 2017
2,967
How would it? How is someone supposed to know where the best weapons are the first time they’re playing the game? Why can’t they be locked behind difficult puzzles, challenges or optional boss encounters? BOTW isn’t a difficult game as is but there’s definitely ways they could keep the open aspect of the game without having weapons break 2-3 times per encounter.

Like, how do you know what a player could do in a hypothetical game that doesn’t exist?
They literally point out the end game area in the tutorial. That’s how someone is supposed to know.
 

HK-47

Member
Oct 25, 2017
2,967
Here's a real bad one:
In the Valkyria Chronicles series, missions are scored based on how long it takes to complete the objectives (capturing enemy camps), rather than clearing out the enemies.

Intended behavior: Encourage players to utilize the tactical tools provided to greatest effect.
Actually behavior: Encourage players to abuse high mobility units to bypass threats to reach the final camp and end the mission.

Also, the mission design tends to suffer because the higher difficulty missions are just basically putting super units in the path of the player's unit to prevent cheese.
This was terrible. And it’s so obviously terrible, too.