MIDSOMMAR - First Trailer - from director Ari Aster (Hereditary)

theBmZ

Avenger
Oct 29, 2017
952
Got back from seeing it a couple hours ago. I... loved it. I liked Hereditary quite a bit when it came out but I’ve come down a little bit on it since then. This was leagues better than that. The atmosphere, the world building, the acting, the story, and use of themes is so stellar.

It’s not really scary, but it is uncomfortable, and maintains a feeling of unease and intrigue throughout. The film gets pretty twisted at times, but you have to see what else this place has to offer. There are a few moments that the outcomes of which I could see coming, but the tension is so well built, that I found myself questioning whether or not they would pull the trigger. And a few of these moments are capped off with extreme gore. So squeamish beware.

It’s beautifully shot. It’s colorful, and there are many creatively framed shots throughout. The choice to have this take place almost entirely during daytime is a bold one for a film marketed as a horror film, but I think it pays off tremendously, and really helps sell this community, and the twisted, borderline absurd stuff that happens in the film. The score likewise is fantastic, moving from European inspired ritualistic tunes, to more unsettling horror sounds, and a masterful building of tension from start to finish.

The acting from everyone is great, but Florence Pugh is the real star here. Ari Aster has a way of getting actors to reach inside themselves and find the raw human emotion, and put it on full display. Pugh is fantastic in the film. You feel for her character and really kind of get behind her, and her performance is important, because her emotional state is incredibly important, especially in the final act.

The themes of family, loss, grief, and the breakup movie vibe are so well woven into the film. The opening minutes really set Pugh’s character up brilliantly, and helps the audience buy into the decisions that are made late in the film. I, to my own surprise, had a drink the kool-aid moment in the end.
I found myself so invested in Pugh’s character, that after she’s made the sacrifice and is shown reacting and finally settling on a smile, I was almost moved to tears at her finding a sense of peace, despite the horrific nature of the situation.
The film is very bizarre, and twisted, but so well conceived, that you as an audience member kind of buy into it.

The film gets you in the characters shoes, but also has an almost documentarian quality to it. You are both a participant, and an observer in the proceedings. And this will certainly be something that turns people off, but the length of the film, I felt was completely justified, and a benefit to the film. Everything is given so much time to be explained, and digested, that you really come away with a real understanding of this place, and the twisted way in which it operates. Some may find it meandering, and self indulgent, and I can understand that. But I thought it was totally necessary, and I can’t imagine a 1 hr 50 min version of this.

After Hereditary I was hoping for something a little more bold, and unique. And while it definitely shares similarities with The Wicker Man, I felt like it was enough of its own thing to be called original. It turned out to be one of my favorite films of this year so far. I can’t wait to see what Aster puts out next.
 

More_Badass

Member
Oct 25, 2017
15,858
I loved how much of the music would be revealed to be diegetic. Every time it felt a bit disorienting, almost playfully self-aware.
 
Oct 26, 2017
6,760
Hereditary was one of my favorite pics that year, but this did not click with me one bit

The beginning showed promise, that shocking early scene before the trip had me excited for that tangible sense of terror that was done so well in Hereditary, but then it didn’t happen.

I felt there was way too much of a slow burn with this one, and there was never any pay off. Sure, there’s a few disturbing images, but nothing close to THAT scene or the last thirty minutes of Hereditary.

Florence Pugh turned in great work, as did most of the cult, but I thought the rest of the performances were either dull, like Jack Reynor, or annoying, like the comic relief friend.

I was expecting to be shocked and disturbed like i was watching Hereditary, instead I was just bored.

This and Godzilla are the biggest disappointments of the year for me.
This mirrors a lot of my thoughts. I love a good slow burn, but it has to payoff. The payoff here simply wasn't good enough, and most of the beats towards the end predictable.

I'll say it again though. Pugh really was amazing. No scene shook me as hard as
the opening scene of her on the couch in her boyfriend's lap, heaving and crying her eyes out. And that is saying a lot coming from this movie.
Her performance there was downright soul shaking and raw. You'd have thought they shot her pets right before yelling action.
 

Mezentine

Member
Oct 25, 2017
3,404
Too lazy to copy pasta my post from the box office thread, but I didn’t enjoy this movie.

Can we talk about how everything that happened before the title card really had no purpose aside from making you feel bad for the main character? You could cut that entirely, and the brief hallucination she has of it, and the movie would still be the same. It’s like the writers completely forgot about it.
The movie is all about her finding a space to express her grief
 

Ghazi

Member
Oct 25, 2017
115
I'm a little confused,
When Harper's character was taking pictures of the book, he saw Mark (Will Poulter), right? What had happened to him?
I was walking back into the theater right as that happened.
 
Oct 26, 2017
6,760
I'm a little confused,
When Harper's character was taking pictures of the book, he saw Josh (Will Poulter), right? What had happened to him?
I was walking back into the theater right as that happened.
I was confused too. His genitals looked bloody, then when he looked over his body, it looked like someone had cut his face off and was wearing it? So it might have been someone else wearing the whole skin? Or they plucked out his eyes? I dunno.
 

Hampig

Member
Oct 25, 2017
757
Too lazy to copy pasta my post from the box office thread, but I didn’t enjoy this movie.

Can we talk about how everything that happened before the title card really had no purpose aside from making you feel bad for the main character? You could cut that entirely, and the brief hallucination she has of it, and the movie would still be the same. It’s like the writers completely forgot about it.
What did you think this movie was about?

I was confused too. His genitals looked bloody, then when he looked over his body, it looked like someone had cut his face off and was wearing it? So it might have been someone else wearing the whole skin? Or they plucked out his eyes? I dunno.
I'd guess based on seeing him at the end that your guess is right. He's all filled with hay, so they probably had just hollowed him out and were wearing him as a festive outfit.
 

KarneeKarnay

Member
Oct 28, 2017
2,936
Just saw it last night. One of the most beautifully shot films I've ever seen with some incredible acting from every one.

That said I found myself very bored around the half way point.
I usually find myself with with weird imagery in film, but this was like weird imagery overload. After the halfway point it was no longer disturbing or interesting to me. I freely admit that I'm someone who looks for meaning in film, which is why I was disappointed when I realised that a lot of the weird behaviour and actions of the cultists were just there to be weird. There are definite themes in this film. Grief, relationships and cycles, but a lot of the weird imagery doesn't really play to this, and when you realise this , the whole movie feels vapid.

I still absolutely recommend seeing this movie. The cinematography and acting alone, make this one of the best movies all year.
 

Brakke

Member
Oct 27, 2017
3,088
Had a blast with this.

The opening was savage.

Movie had a lot of absolutely wild images. That tube mask messed me up.

I'd guess based on seeing him at the end that your guess is right. He's all filled with hay, so they probably had just hollowed him out and were wearing him as a festive outfit.
Earlier on, some kids are running around playing a game called “skin the fool.”
 

TheModestGun

Member
Dec 5, 2017
2,211
This movie gutted me in so many ways throughout.

I left the theater with a feeling of disgust, but in the kind of way that you appreciate that the film was capable of building such an intense feeling inside you.

I think what’s made both Midsommar and Hereditary both so challenging and disturbing is just how long Ari Aster is willing to make you sit with the misery.
 

Zombine

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,410
I’ve decided to never see an Ari Aster film in theaters ever again. I loved the film, but this is the second time that the crowd was the lowest common denominator expecting a Conjuring-esque horror movie, leaving them unable to process the themes or imagery. I had trailer trash sitting in the lower rows laughing at most of the beats in the film, some guy who kept laughing in my row, and some lady behind me that said “oh my goddd this is the worst film I ever saw.” The crowd was genuinely ridiculous. Similar thing happened with every major story beat in Hereditary.

Other than that, I really enjoyed it. I felt terrible for the lead and most of her problems hit really close to home. I think Ari walked a very thin line with the whole concept, but ultimately I’d say he succeeded in not turning it into a film about a Social Democratic boogeyman. People talk
Shit about the north anyways lol.
 

Zombine

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,410
I had this experience when I went to see Annihilation and it suuuuucked. During the movie too.
The guy behind me had enough and he said “Why the FUCK are you here then?” I saw Annihilation at my little indie theater so I didn’t have any problems. If I do see another one of his films I’ll just go there if it’s playing as the people are respectful.
 

Capra

Member
Oct 25, 2017
2,426
Too lazy to copy pasta my post from the box office thread, but I didn’t enjoy this movie.

Can we talk about how everything that happened before the title card really had no purpose aside from making you feel bad for the main character? You could cut that entirely, and the brief hallucination she has of it, and the movie would still be the same. It’s like the writers completely forgot about it.
The entire movie is about her dealing with the trauma of losing her family under very specific circumstances. Her family is taken away by her family, leaving her to process her pain with a boyfriend who doesn't give two shits about her. She finds a new family in the cult who grants her the catharsis she wasn't able to have before.

I have no idea what you could think the point of the movie is otherwise
 

Solo

Avenger
Oct 25, 2017
6,680
This definitely goes down as one of the most immaculately shot, gorgeous genre films ever made. Ever.

After a night to digest though, I still dont think much of the movie as an overall package. It had its moments, but overall it was a miss.

Shame because it was so beautiful to look at and Florence Pugh put in such great work.
 

jot

Member
Oct 25, 2017
708
After seeing it yesterday and having some time to process it, I liked it. It wasn't quite the Hereditary-style horror I was expecting, but a fine work in its own right.

That being said, if people didn't like it, I would *completely* understand and not think any lesser of them for it.
 

zuf

Member
Oct 25, 2017
432
edit: word soup.

The whole experience felt like pulling teeth (147 minute run time?!?). I think I'll give Aster's next one a swerve!
 
Last edited:
Oct 28, 2017
852
manchester
I was confused too. His genitals looked bloody, then when he looked over his body, it looked like someone had cut his face off and was wearing it? So it might have been someone else wearing the whole skin? Or they plucked out his eyes? I dunno.
my reading is that they skinned him and his face was worn by the 'oracle' (i thought you could hear his strained groans as 'mark' watched over josh's body). i personally think this relates to the creation of another oracle, but i could be reading way too much in to it and it was just a plan to kill mark after what happened with the tree.

man, what an experience. this sits up with 'mother!' as just a crushing, miserable trip that is still utterly wonderful to sit through. beautifully shot throughout, the golden veneer on top of how we handle loss, those that grieve and our elderly and frail. the soundtrack reminded me of schyman's work for bioshock infinite, discordance and cacophony beneath beautiful, droning chords. pugh's a personal revelation and i'll keep and eye out for her further work. i've never seen panic attacks played so well.

I don't see how you could read that scene any other way.
it was the hands on the arse that did it.
 
Last edited:
Oct 29, 2017
1,757
Minnesota
For real why the hell was this 2.5 hours
Yeah. My only big problem with it was the runtime. I really liked the movie--its visually stunning--but I was damn glad when the climax hit because I was getting tired of being in the theater.

Going two and a half hours in full on surreal mode is a bold idea, but one I didn't completely care for. I started getting numb to it.

I'm glad my theater was basically empty. Was a gentleman right behind me but other than popcorn, was silent until the very last fade out when he went

"Huh?"

And I fucking lost it and laughed so hard. Summed up everything pretty well :P
 

BlueTsunami

Member
Oct 29, 2017
3,396
I'm afraid to watch this. Hereditary was a one and done watch for me. I loved it but it was so damn oppressive I never want to sit through it again. I feel this will be similar.
 
Oct 28, 2017
453
I really enjoyed the movie, but it didn't leave me feeling as scared or as fucked up as Hereditary. It definitely felt slow at times but at times I found that slowness tense since I didn't know where things were going. My only complaint is it all sort of played out the way I expected too, but it was all executed magnificently. Pugh's acting is amazing too and got me invested in her character and the movie as a whole.

Glad to see her character happy again at the end even in the midst of chaos.
 

jviggy43

Banned
Oct 28, 2017
12,893
Saw this yesterday. Went into it with lower expectations than Hereditary, as well as less hype. I left the film liking it overall, but finding it longer than it needed to be and with a setting that didn't really contribute a ton to the core story outside of the ending. I always was hoping for Aster to invert some of our expectations regarding communes in horror films.

The death of Pugh's sister and parents was harrowing, but then it feels ignored for the bulk of the film. It's an inciting incident that motivates her going to Sweden, but outside of a couple of PTSD flashbacks, it may as well have been a non-event. It'd be one thing if her family had died in a car accident or an electrical fire. But her sister, suffering from mental health issues, murders what's left of her family. It's such a specific kind of tragedy that it feels like a betrayal to introduce that element and then say, "Yeah, but this film isn't gonna be about that - it's gonna be about a loveless relationship." I feel like Aster could have made an entire film exploring the grief that comes from that, but maybe he felt it'd be too similar to Hereditary.

The film has a lot of narrative intrigue, but then it includes some subplots that just feel wholly extraneous... Jack Reynor's thesis feud with his friend, the "un-clouded" child that is shown a couple of times but otherwise has not much else to do, Will Poulter and his hots for the girl character that ultimately skins off his face. I don't know... at over 2 hours long the film just felt like it could have been more efficient while still holding on to its great atmosphere.

Before they even went to Sweden, I briefly thought, "I bet this Swedish friend is setting them all up," but then thought about how that's too much of a cliché for Aster to use. I was disappointed when this ended up being the case. I was also disappointed that the endless sunlight aspect wasn't mined for more psychological terror - instead we just get these visual hallucinations that are repeated a few times.

Lastly, I'm conflicted about what the ending says about Pugh as a character. For the bulk of the film we're on her side. She's in this relationship she's trying to make work with her asshole boyfriend who treats her like an obligation. But by the end of it, she's choosing to sacrifice him? I don't care that she found him cheating on her (although to be fair, she wouldn't have known he was under mind control) - the fact that she'd not only choose to sacrifice him but then have that smile on her face at the end felt so lame to me. It reminded me of how disappointed I was with that part towards the end of Us when evil Lupita gives her son that lame smile. I thought in this renaissance of horror we had moved past the "evil smile" trope, but I guess not.

Despite all these criticisms, it is an interesting film. Will Poulter adds a lot of comedy to it and Aster continues to be great at working with actors and achieving this emotional truth behind much of their interactions. But it definitely feels like a sophomore effort - a little less focused than his debut, with some more narrative dead ends that could have been ironed out with a few more rewrites.
Just wanted to say this echoed a lot of my own thoughts as well. I didnt love it, but I enjoyed it even if I had a lot of these same issues throughout.
 

Mezentine

Member
Oct 25, 2017
3,404
Saw this yesterday. Went into it with lower expectations than Hereditary, as well as less hype. I left the film liking it overall, but finding it longer than it needed to be and with a setting that didn't really contribute a ton to the core story outside of the ending. I always was hoping for Aster to invert some of our expectations regarding communes in horror films.

The death of Pugh's sister and parents was harrowing, but then it feels ignored for the bulk of the film. It's an inciting incident that motivates her going to Sweden, but outside of a couple of PTSD flashbacks, it may as well have been a non-event. It'd be one thing if her family had died in a car accident or an electrical fire. But her sister, suffering from mental health issues, murders what's left of her family. It's such a specific kind of tragedy that it feels like a betrayal to introduce that element and then say, "Yeah, but this film isn't gonna be about that - it's gonna be about a loveless relationship." I feel like Aster could have made an entire film exploring the grief that comes from that, but maybe he felt it'd be too similar to Hereditary.

The film has a lot of narrative intrigue, but then it includes some subplots that just feel wholly extraneous... Jack Reynor's thesis feud with his friend, the "un-clouded" child that is shown a couple of times but otherwise has not much else to do, Will Poulter and his hots for the girl character that ultimately skins off his face. I don't know... at over 2 hours long the film just felt like it could have been more efficient while still holding on to its great atmosphere.

Before they even went to Sweden, I briefly thought, "I bet this Swedish friend is setting them all up," but then thought about how that's too much of a cliché for Aster to use. I was disappointed when this ended up being the case. I was also disappointed that the endless sunlight aspect wasn't mined for more psychological terror - instead we just get these visual hallucinations that are repeated a few times.

Lastly, I'm conflicted about what the ending says about Pugh as a character. For the bulk of the film we're on her side. She's in this relationship she's trying to make work with her asshole boyfriend who treats her like an obligation. But by the end of it, she's choosing to sacrifice him? I don't care that she found him cheating on her (although to be fair, she wouldn't have known he was under mind control) - the fact that she'd not only choose to sacrifice him but then have that smile on her face at the end felt so lame to me. It reminded me of how disappointed I was with that part towards the end of Us when evil Lupita gives her son that lame smile. I thought in this renaissance of horror we had moved past the "evil smile" trope, but I guess not.

Despite all these criticisms, it is an interesting film. Will Poulter adds a lot of comedy to it and Aster continues to be great at working with actors and achieving this emotional truth behind much of their interactions. But it definitely feels like a sophomore effort - a little less focused than his debut, with some more narrative dead ends that could have been ironed out with a few more rewrites.
Ah I couldn't disagree more. It all comes together for me. At the end
all of the self-centered people she was surrounded by have, in various ways, gone to their own demises and she's left in a community that will share her pain, even if its in an over the top way. The commune is just that, a commune
 

Aizō

The Fallen
Oct 25, 2017
4,438
ほぼ真ん中の方
I loved this movie. I think the run time was a great part of the experience. I felt trapped along with the rest of them in that Swedish hell.
Saw this yesterday. Went into it with lower expectations than Hereditary, as well as less hype. I left the film liking it overall, but finding it longer than it needed to be and with a setting that didn't really contribute a ton to the core story outside of the ending. I always was hoping for Aster to invert some of our expectations regarding communes in horror films.

The death of Pugh's sister and parents was harrowing, but then it feels ignored for the bulk of the film. It's an inciting incident that motivates her going to Sweden, but outside of a couple of PTSD flashbacks, it may as well have been a non-event. It'd be one thing if her family had died in a car accident or an electrical fire. But her sister, suffering from mental health issues, murders what's left of her family. It's such a specific kind of tragedy that it feels like a betrayal to introduce that element and then say, "Yeah, but this film isn't gonna be about that - it's gonna be about a loveless relationship." I feel like Aster could have made an entire film exploring the grief that comes from that, but maybe he felt it'd be too similar to Hereditary.

The film has a lot of narrative intrigue, but then it includes some subplots that just feel wholly extraneous... Jack Reynor's thesis feud with his friend, the "un-clouded" child that is shown a couple of times but otherwise has not much else to do, Will Poulter and his hots for the girl character that ultimately skins off his face. I don't know... at over 2 hours long the film just felt like it could have been more efficient while still holding on to its great atmosphere.

Before they even went to Sweden, I briefly thought, "I bet this Swedish friend is setting them all up," but then thought about how that's too much of a cliché for Aster to use. I was disappointed when this ended up being the case. I was also disappointed that the endless sunlight aspect wasn't mined for more psychological terror - instead we just get these visual hallucinations that are repeated a few times.

Lastly, I'm conflicted about what the ending says about Pugh as a character. For the bulk of the film we're on her side. She's in this relationship she's trying to make work with her asshole boyfriend who treats her like an obligation. But by the end of it, she's choosing to sacrifice him? I don't care that she found him cheating on her (although to be fair, she wouldn't have known he was under mind control) - the fact that she'd not only choose to sacrifice him but then have that smile on her face at the end felt so lame to me. It reminded me of how disappointed I was with that part towards the end of Us when evil Lupita gives her son that lame smile. I thought in this renaissance of horror we had moved past the "evil smile" trope, but I guess not.

Despite all these criticisms, it is an interesting film. Will Poulter adds a lot of comedy to it and Aster continues to be great at working with actors and achieving this emotional truth behind much of their interactions. But it definitely feels like a sophomore effort - a little less focused than his debut, with some more narrative dead ends that could have been ironed out with a few more rewrites.
I don't think she's a cruel character. She's completely fucking lost it by the end. Also, I totally disagree that her pain is ignored. I felt like she's fighting it the whole movie. I felt that pain in every forced smile.
 

J_Viper

Member
Oct 25, 2017
8,887
As someone else stated here, that fucked up scene that happens right before the title card was deliciously harrowing, and set an expectation that the film never captured. Even in the hammer scene.

And I do really need to reinforce how terrible this Jack Reynor fellow is, guy is like a Dane Cook-tier actor. I don't know how the fuck this guy found work again after Transformers.
I took my phone out to look at the time during the credits and was surprised to see that it wasn’t later. I could have sworn the movie was over 3 hours
Yeah, I really felt the runtime here. I actually had a headache by the time I left the theater.
 
Oct 28, 2017
852
manchester
I really enjoyed the movie, but it didn't leave me feeling as scared or as fucked up as Hereditary. It definitely felt slow at times but at times I found that slowness tense since I didn't know where things were going. My only complaint is it all sort of played out the way I expected too, but it was all executed magnificently. Pugh's acting is amazing too and got me invested in her character and the movie as a whole.

Glad to see her character happy again at the end even in the midst of chaos.
Ah I couldn't disagree more. It all comes together for me. At the end
all of the self-centered people she was surrounded by have, in various ways, gone to their own demises and she's left in a community that will share her pain, even if its in an over the top way. The commune is just that, a commune
it's an arguement for social vs private healthcare.

(maybe /s?)
 

Blader

Member
Oct 27, 2017
9,309
I’ve decided to never see an Ari Aster film in theaters ever again. I loved the film, but this is the second time that the crowd was the lowest common denominator expecting a Conjuring-esque horror movie, leaving them unable to process the themes or imagery. I had trailer trash sitting in the lower rows laughing at most of the beats in the film, some guy who kept laughing in my row, and some lady behind me that said “oh my goddd this is the worst film I ever saw.” The crowd was genuinely ridiculous. Similar thing happened with every major story beat in Hereditary.
I hate this shit too. Last Halloween, I went to a screening of the '78 film... Halloween! For its 40th anniversary! On Halloween night! And the crowd was snickering through it the entire time. I don't know if it's nervous laughter because they're uncomfortable and have no other way of getting that out, but it is so goddamn annoying.
 

bill crystals

Member
Oct 25, 2017
347
It was way, way, way too long. Brevity is the soul of wit, filmmakers. Keep it fucking short lol you're not Stanley Kubrick. If you're going to make a long movie, at least take some time to really sharpen up the pacing because not only was this movie long, it was ploddingly slow throughout. It's nice to wallow in the gorgeous cinematography a little bit, but any sense of urgency or tension is pretty much immediately dispelled as the film lingers on the next inconsequential thing for way too long.

Hereditary, by extreme contrast, MOVED. That movie was exciting the whole way through.
 

beelzebozo

Member
Oct 26, 2017
772
As someone else stated here, that fucked up scene that happens right before the title card was deliciously harrowing, and set an expectation that the film never captured. Even in the hammer scene.

And I do really need to reinforce how terrible this Jack Reynor fellow is, guy is like a Dane Cook-tier actor. I don't know how the fuck this guy found work again after Transformers.

Yeah, I really felt the runtime here. I actually had a headache by the time I left the theater.
jack reynor is amazing in Sing Street. he is really good.
 

Mobu

The Fallen
Oct 28, 2017
2,521
I’ve decided to never see an Ari Aster film in theaters ever again. I loved the film, but this is the second time that the crowd was the lowest common denominator expecting a Conjuring-esque horror movie, leaving them unable to process the themes or imagery. I had trailer trash sitting in the lower rows laughing at most of the beats in the film, some guy who kept laughing in my row, and some lady behind me that said “oh my goddd this is the worst film I ever saw.” The crowd was genuinely ridiculous. Similar thing happened with every major story beat in Hereditary.

Other than that, I really enjoyed it. I felt terrible for the lead and most of her problems hit really close to home. I think Ari walked a very thin line with the whole concept, but ultimately I’d say he succeeded in not turning it into a film about a Social Democratic boogeyman. People talk
Shit about the north anyways lol.
Even straigh horrors moves get super shitty audiences, horror is not just a good genre for that, i always try to go to super early screenings because of it
 

TheModestGun

Member
Dec 5, 2017
2,211
I'm afraid to watch this. Hereditary was a one and done watch for me. I loved it but it was so damn oppressive I never want to sit through it again. I feel this will be similar.
Yes. It very much has the same sort of deep dread and tone that makes you sit with the human suffering. Just pure misery.

Left the theater with a deep pit in my stomach.

For what it’s worth, it was an excellent film, but I don’t know if I’ll be able to ever watch it again.
 

Fantastical

Member
Oct 27, 2017
1,421
There are some obvious similarities between Herediary and Midsommar.

Hereditary begins with the death of a protagonist's mother and then the gut wrenching loss of her daughter, lots of hysterical Toni Collete crying. The beginning of Midsommar is similar with the loss of her parents and sister causing a complete breakdown of the protagonist. The scene with Dani crying on the couch is very reminiscent of Collete's character scream-crying on the floor with her husband consoling her.

Both movies also deal with cults bringing innocent people into their rituals for sacrifice, slowly putting steps in place to fulfill their goal. The members of the cult feigning friendliness the characters they are about to kill.

Both movies feature a physically disfigured person.

I hope Aster goes away from the cult stuff in his next movie though. I think Hereditary is such a better movie because of the family drama stuff and the impact of the death of the daughter. I wish we had seen more of the relationship stuff when they were at the commune. I feel like some stuff between Christian and Dani was probably cut.

I'm afraid to watch this. Hereditary was a one and done watch for me. I loved it but it was so damn oppressive I never want to sit through it again. I feel this will be similar.
Definitely yes haha. I felt the same about Hereditary.
 

BlueTsunami

Member
Oct 29, 2017
3,396
There are some obvious similarities between Herediary and Midsommar.

Hereditary begins with the death of a protagonist's mother and then the gut wrenching loss of her daughter, lots of hysterical Toni Collete crying. The beginning of Midsommar is similar with the loss of her parents and sister causing a complete breakdown of the protagonist. The scene with Dani crying on the couch is very reminiscent of Collete's character scream-crying on the floor with her husband consoling her.

Both movies also deal with cults bringing innocent people into their rituals for sacrifice, slowly putting steps in place to fulfill their goal. The members of the cult feigning friendliness the characters they are about to kill.

Both movies feature a physically disfigured person.

I hope Aster goes away from the cult stuff in his next movie though. I think Hereditary is such a better movie because of the family drama stuff and the impact of the death of the daughter. I wish we had seen more of the relationship stuff when they were at the commune. I feel like some stuff between Christian and Dani was probably cut.


Definitely yes haha. I felt the same about Hereditary.
Yep I walked out the theater elated by what I just witnessed but never ever again. The contrasting bright dark vibe is infused in this film so deeply that it was disconcerting in a way I've never experienced from a horror film. Made to face the violence with a bright grin.

I also loved the psychotropic angle. I had no idea this would be a thing. Having had bad trips in my life the thought of experiencing that sort of suffering under its influence... it makes me nauseous just thinking about it.
 
Oct 25, 2017
4,988
Ari Aster's next film needs to be a pure drama. The relationship stuff in this and the family drama in Hereditary are so fucking strong. More please.
 

blame space

Resettlement Advisor
Member
Oct 25, 2017
4,031
but i like the creepy/dreadful framing. what's stopping this from being a "pure drama" in the first place? the setting?