Movies You've Seen Recently | February 2020

Divius

Member
Oct 25, 2017
727
The Netherlands
> MOVIE OF THE YEAR VOTING THREAD <

Welcome

Hello and welcome to the monthly Movies You've Seen Recently thread. The place to hang out with fellow movie lovers!

Thread rules
1. Be nice, be civil, use common sense
2. Respect the opinions of other members, no matter how wrong they are
3. Use spoiler tags accordingly
4. Have fun, we’re all here because we love movies

DO NOT just post the title of the movie you watched. It isn't conducive to the kind of discussion & communication we want to engender here, because it tells us nothing of you, the movie, the impact of the latter on the former. Post scores, descriptions, essays, poems, gifs, hashtags, whatever provides you the best outlet for personal expression, you unique little digital snowflake. - icarus-daedelus
Want to introduce yourself?
New to the Movies You've Seen Recently community? Let us know a bit about yourself:
1. What's your favorite Movie?
2. Who's your favorite director?
3. Who are your favorite actors/actresses?
4. Favorite Genre(s)?
5. What's your favorite performance in film?

- Post your top 5 new viewings from the previous month!

Useful external links:
Letterboxd
ICheckMovies
IMDb
Rotten Tomatoes
Metacritic

Also check out the official Film Era discord!
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List of Movies you've seen recently members on letterboxd said:
If you want to be added to the list above, shoot me a PM and you'll be added.

Unsure of what to watch? Just ask for recommendations in here. We don’t bite!
 
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Pachimari

Member
Oct 25, 2017
11,273
Saw 4 movies in January, all of which were rewatches.

TOP REWATCHES:
1. Blade Runner: Final Cut
2. Captain America: Civil War
3. Avengers: Infinity War
4. Spider-Man: Homecoming

This month I'm gonna catch Birds of Prey at the cinema. And I'm probably gonna check out Uncut Gems too.
 
OP
OP
Divius

Divius

Member
Oct 25, 2017
727
The Netherlands
I've logged 20 entries for films during January 2020

TOP 5 NEW VIEWINGS OF JANUARY

5. Bliss
4. Doctor Sleep
3. Aniara
2. Uncut Gems
1. Portrait of a Lady on Fire

MOST VALUABLE REWATCHES OF JANUARY
None, didn't rewatch anything.

WORST NEW VIEWINGS OF JANUARY
Alladin
 

Darkwing-Buck

Member
Oct 25, 2017
13,095
Los Angeles, CA
I've logged 7 entries for films during January 2020

TOP 5 NEW VIEWINGS OF JANUARY

5. The House That Jack Built
4. Dressed To Kill
3. De Palma
2. Blow Out
1. Little Women

MOST VALUABLE REWATCHES OF JANUARY
None,

WORST NEW VIEWINGS OF JANUARY
*sighs* National Lampoon presents Men In White
 

Zousi

Member
Oct 31, 2017
129
33 movies in January. Top 5 nw:

1. Parasite (2019)
2. Boy (2010)
3. The Cranes Are Flying (1957)
4. Wild Rose (2018)
5. The Human Part (2018)
 

Ayeffen

Member
Jan 27, 2020
21
Managed to catch the following in January at the cinema:

1. 1/1/20 - The Gentlemen - See you next Tuesday
2. 7/1/20 - Bombshell - This movie has legs! 😅
3. 12/1/20 - 1917 (4DX)- Really impressed with this film. I'm not sure it was worth seeing in 4DX in the end but I loved the journey and the story contained to two characters.
4. 14/1/20 - Richard Jewell - This was an interesting account of that scandal but I doubt I'll re-watch.
5. 23/1/20 - Waves - I knew nothing about this film before I saw it and it was VERY intense. Do not see if you're feeling emotionally available that day 😂 The performances were outstanding, cinematography was great, music was great. I have a soft spot for Reneé Elise Goldsberry so it was great to see her in a film role.

Planned for Feb so far are:

Queen & Slim
Parasite
Erin Brockovich Dark Waters
 
Oct 27, 2017
15,814
Seattle
Logged 27 new viewings in January.

TOP 5 NEW VIEWINGS OF JANUARY
5. Lady Bird
4. The Handmaiden
3. Her
2. Shoplifters
1. Parasite

MOST VALUABLE REWATCHES OF JANUARY
None.

WORST NEW VIEWINGS OF JANUARY
*
If I had to pick one, but would be Colossal (still enjoyed it, tho)
 

n8 dogg

Member
Oct 25, 2017
624
Top Viewings

1. Uncut Gems
2. The Lighthouse
3. Parasite
4. Little Women
5. Ad Astra

Worst
1. Downsizing
2. The Hole in the Ground
3. The Hustle
 

shaneo632

Member
Oct 29, 2017
14,129
Essex, UK
Wow, sounds like quite a few rising filmmakers struggled with following up acclaimed movies at Sundance - new Dee Rees movie getting panned, mediocre notices for new films from Benh Zeitlin and Justin Simien too :\
 

sackboy97

Member
Oct 26, 2017
1,690
Italy
Wow, sounds like quite a few rising filmmakers struggled with following up acclaimed movies at Sundance - new Dee Rees movie getting panned, mediocre notices for new films from Benh Zeitlin and Justin Simien too :\
That's unfortunate. I found Mudbound to be really good, was also thinking of rewatching it soon.
 

Blader

Member
Oct 27, 2017
12,913
Top 5 New Viewings in January:
1. American Factory
2. Ad Astra
3. Birdman of Alcatraz
4. Mike Wallace Is Here
5. Soylent Green / 1917

Worst New Viewing:
Cold Case Hammarskjold
 

hydruxo

Member
Oct 25, 2017
6,420
Saw 9 movies in January.

Top 5 new watches last month:
  1. Spirited Away
  2. Magnolia
  3. The Last Black Man in San Francisco
  4. 1917
  5. John Wick 3
First film of February was Sorry To Bother You. It's one I've wanted to see for a while and I'm not quite sure how I feel about it. I loved how creative it was and the performances were excellent (Lakeith Stanfield is amazing as always) but it fizzles out a bit in the final act when things take a turn. The messages in it seemed too heavy handed at times too, but I think this might be one that grows on me after a rewatch though because it does a lot of interesting things and it's fun to watch. Overall it's an enjoyable satire of capitalism and worth checking out.

I got Parasite on blu-ray in this morning so I'm going to finally watch that either today or tomorrow.
 

BasilZero

Member
Oct 25, 2017
12,569
Omni
New to the thread

1. What's your favorite Movie?
-Star Wars Episodes I-VI
-Lord of the Rings Trilogy
-Harry Potter series
-MCU films (all of them specifically all the Avengers movies, Spiderman, Iron Man, Captain America, Black Panther, and Ant Man)
-Nightmare before Christmas
-Interstellar
-Batman The Dark Knight
-Terminator 1 and 2
-Hocus Pocus
-All of the Disney animated films (2D and 3D)

2. Who's your favorite director?
N/A (Dont really have a favorite

3. Who are your favorite actors/actresses?
N/A (Dont really have a favorite)

4. Favorite Genre(s)?
-Fantasy
-Sci-Fi
-Action
-Horror

5. What's your favorite performance in film?
N/A (Dont really have a favorite)


-----

As what I watched in January?



-Alice in Wonderland (2010)
-Alice Looking into the Glass
-Aladdin (2019)
-Dumbo (2019)



I also watched The Lion King (2019) yesterday.


Now that I have access to Disney+ - I'm gonna probably see a ton of Disney movies this year lol.
 

andrew

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,351
Best new viewings:

1) Five Easy Pieces
2) A Boy and His Dog
3) Soylent Green
4) The Dead Don't Die
5) The Beach Bum

Most valuable rewatches:
My Neighbor Totoro
Children of Men

Worst new watch:
Where'd You Go Bernadette
1917
 

Josh5890

The Fallen
Oct 25, 2017
3,715
I saw Little Women last night for the second time. Great film but if I had one complaint, it would be how many times the film jumps between past and present.
 
Oct 25, 2017
300
9 watches for me in January, plus 1 short (What Did Jack Do?)

Best New Watches:
1. Raging Bull
2. If Beale Street Could Talk
3. Hard Eight
4. News from Home
5. Just Another Girl on the I.R.T.
Honorable Mentions: THX 1138, The Last Black Man in San Francisco

Best Rewatches:
1. The Lighthouse
2. The Royal Tenenbaums

Worst Watches:
None, I enjoyed everything I watched in January.

-----------------------------------------

Ariel - Ariel finds director Aki Kaurismäki occupying the same aesthetic and tonal sphere of his film Shadows in Paradise. He uses the same understated filmmaking to tap into the characters' mindsets. From the very first frame, there is an immediate sense of foreboding and coldness coming from the concrete of the just-shuttered mine. This same coldness -- almost indifference -- is reflected in the snowy environment; it put me in the mind of how Fargo would go on to film a similar setting. The opening is a great, subtle way of foreshadowing what comes with the rest of the film.

Kaurismäki also continues his brand of straight forward, deadpan dialogue. It cuts right to the core of what the characters are feeling. They express themselves very plainly, barely masking the contempt they have for their situations. Though these characters often make terrible decisions of desperation -- specifically Turo Pajala's and Matti Pellonpää's characters -- there is still a sense of empathy for the characters in the film. This is also true for Susanna Haavisto's character. She works at least three dead-end, unfulfilling jobs with no relief in sight. They are realistic characters that are trying their best to survive within a system that doesn't care about them. Ariel feels very prescient of how the world is now, 32 years later. Turo Pajala's main character going from place to place struggling to find work feels very modern and relevant. It just goes to show how little has changed between now and then and how universal these feelings of drudgery, desperation, and alienation are.

Also returning from Shadows in Paradise is a streak of dark humor running throughout the film. The shed falling apart at the beginning of the film, the kid asking for coffee at gunpoint, and the tragically hilarious button in the back of the car hit the right tones of existential despair and ironic, absurdist humor. Even something as simple as lightning a cigarette sometimes just doesn't go right. It's just tragedy after tragedy and at some point you just have to take a step back and laugh at the totality of it all.

At a stout 72 minutes, Ariel taps into similar feelings and thematic points from Shadows in Paradise while still being its own unique film; it remains just as effective and entertaining. Kaurismäki's ability to convey a compelling story, grounded characters, and explore the dull reality of modern existence in such a short time is damn impressive. His aesthetic sensibilities and sense of humor really hit home for me. It's been a treat exploring his filmography and I can't wait to dig deeper.
 

DirtyLarry

Member
Oct 27, 2017
1,917
Requiem for the American Dream

I just stumbled upon this documentary this morning.
I urge anyone, especially Americans since it affects use directly, who are interested in the whole concept of the less than 1% having the majority of the wealth in the country to watch it.
From the description "Chomsky... makes plain the principles perpetuating the concentration of wealth and power in the hands of a select few."

I have (attempted to) read a few of his books over the years and they have always been pretty damn dense. Hard reads is the easiest way I can put it. Very intellectual and heady. This documentary breaks it down to a much simpler to digest format yet is still very informative and in depth. Basically it is Chomsky for Dummies.

The documentary is also on HULU if you do not have Amazon prime. Sure it is elsewhere as well.
 
May 24, 2019
3,619
Watched ten movies in Jan, all first timers:

Top Five:
1. The Duelists (1977)
2. The Last Wave (1977)
3. Little Women
4. A Hidden Life
5. Minding the Gap

Bottoms (though I didn't hate them):
Long Shot
Underwater
 

True Savior

Member
Oct 27, 2017
4,202
wasteland
As a guy who passionately hated good times, uncut gems is a pretty fucking entertaining low life crime movie, there's an authenticity to it that gives it a very unique vibe. I still think it's unpolished as fuck but this is their style and at least it looks more refined. Kg was a good surprise (he's always been a charismatic mofo tho), Sandler was funny as fuck and Julia Fox, what can I even say.
 

patientzero

Member
Oct 25, 2017
4,268
17 films logged in January, a combination of advancing through the Walt Disney Animation Studios oeuvre and catching up with some 2019 films. I'm treating the Disney stuff as new watches since I haven't seen most of them in over 20 years.

Top 5 Watches
1. Little Women (2019)
2. Bambi
3. Knives Out
4. Fantasia
5. Pinochio

Worst Watches
1. Saludos Amigos
2. A four-way tie between Melody Time, The Three Caballeros, Make Mine Music, and Fun and Fancy Free
 

Rhomega

Member
Oct 25, 2017
2,450
Arizona
Top 5 of January:

1. 1917
2. John Wick Chapter 2
3. Parasite
4. Batman vs. Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles
5. John Wick Chapter 3: Parabellum
 
Oct 25, 2017
502
Hi there! I don't think I've posted in previous threads, I've always just been a lurker (though my memory is shit, so it's possible I did lol). I'm trying to work on writing up at least a few thoughts about every movie I watch, so I'm hoping posting in this thread will help me keep on track.

1. What are your favorite movies?
Favorite movies include:
Hot Fuzz, American Psycho, original SW trilogy, Shaun of the Dead, The Lighthouse is probably going to be included on this list eventually haha
2. Who are your favorite directors?
David Lynch, Edgar Wright, John Carpenter
3. Who are your favorite actors/actresses?
Simon Pegg, Kyle McLachlan, Kurt Russell, Andy Samberg, Will Arnett, Bill Hader
4. Favorite Genre(s)?
Horror, sci-fi, bizarre surreal mindfucks, comedies
5. What's your favorite performance in film?
Christian Bale as Patrick Bateman

I watched 64 films in January (including some shorts), so definitely on a roll so far this year.

Top 11 New Watches in January (not in order and damn it was a great month):
Parasite
Brazil
In Fabric
The Lighthouse
Decoder
High Life
Aniara
The Last Black Man in San Francisco
Booksmart
Swiss Army Man
Dirty Computer Director's Cut

Top 5 Rewatches (not in order):
American Psycho
Hot Rod
Popstar: Never Stop Never Stopping
Big Trouble in Little China
[REC]

Worst Watches:
Wicked Witches
Animal Among Us

 
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Oct 27, 2017
15,814
Seattle
Has anyone seen captain fantastic? I’ve noticed a high average score on LB. but I felt like it set up some situations and didn’t really explore them fully. Based off of the description (about how a family has to reintegrate into society). I still enjoyed the performances and the themes of the movie.
 
May 24, 2019
3,619
I've seen it. Don't remember much except for it maybe being a bit too cutesy (compared to something like Leave No Trace)
 
Oh hey, it's been a bit since one of my monthly rundown posts!

Top Five New Watches for January (no particular order)
-Aniara
-The Beach Bum
-For Sama
-Atlantics
-Long Day's Journey Into Night

Most Valuable Rewatch: The Irishman

The "Guys, Seriously, It's the Same Dumb Shit He's Done on Every Other Film" Award for Lack of Meaningful Progress in a Filmmaker's Career: Climax

And in case it got missed in the previous thread, my blurb on the first film I watched in February!

Bliss: It could have been easy to turn this into the umpteenth "vampirism as an allegory for drug addiction" story, but thankfully, the filmmakers here realized that well has been drawn dry and instead put forth something far more visceral and nerve-wracking, resulting in an abrasive sledgehammer to the face that's bound to alienate many with its hardcore punk aesthetic, damaging soundscape and gruesome excesses of sex, drug usage and gory violence, while finding a fair few fans in the process who probably won't shut up about it for a while for those very same reasons. Suffice it to say, count me among the ranks of the latter, as even if it's not the best vampire film in recent memory, it is undoubtedly one of the most original and exciting ones all the same, leaving me with the conflict of the need to purge out such a volatile cocktail while also desiring, craving even more. A genuine ass-kicker of a film, for all the right reasons.
 
Oct 27, 2017
2,093
January watches in order, bolded are rewatches:
A Hidden Life
Lightning Over Water
The Headless Woman
Rocketman
Bio-Dome
All That Heaven Allows
Ali: Fear Eats the Soul
Far From Heaven
Sweet Smell of Success
Zama
Double Indemnity
Good Time
Raging Bull
Uncut Gems
Taxi Driver
Killer of Sheep

Bless Their Little Hearts
For Sama
Philomena
Goodfellas
The Quiet Man
Straw Dogs

Lots of great stuff, my favorite new watches were Sweet Smell, Raging Bull, and Bless Their Little Hearts. Got to see Charles Burnett in person at UCLA, so that was pretty cool.

Some expanded stuff:

Uncut Gems

Not gonna lie, despite loving Sandman's boisterous performance, Julia Fox's Hall of Fame worthy ass (before anyone gets on me, she's great in the movie!), and just KG in general, about two-thirds of the way through I was ready to write off the Safdie brothers as not totally for me (think Scorsese's Joker comment: "I get it. It's fine."), but then the final bet/climax happened and everything crystallized for me. It retroactively made the journey worth it. One of the best parts is how Arno starts getting into the game at the end too, the allure of sports betting succinctly captured with a mere tilt of the head. As an NBA fan, it's insane to think how far the league has come in terms of scoring/offensive output this decade, I almost laughed out loud when I saw the game was 53-48 with two minutes left in the third quarter. NOTHING EASY! NOTHING EASY! WE GOING TO GAME SEVEN BABY! GAME SEVEN! GAAAAAAME SEEEEEEEVEEEEEEEENNNN!

Taxi Driver

Last seen ~10 years ago. The broad-strokes are as masterful as I remembered, but the film is somehow even more gorgeous than my memory of it, and it's littered with tons of small character moments that I completely forgot about. For example, the gun salesman is an all-time one scene performance. "Ain't that a little honey." Or when the late night crew has a casually progressive conversation about gay people (I really dig Peter Boyle). The Kris Kristofferson part is also quite amusing considering they worked together before this. And though this is as far as can be from style over substance, what goddamn style! I realized about twenty minutes in that this movie is always going to be chased, never topped. That shot at the end of Betsy in the rearview mirror is as good as it gets.

All That Heaven Allows

“Look at that car.”
“Look at that man!”


A personal favorite, first time on the big screen. What can I say, I pretty much adore every second this deliriously lush, socioeconomic affair of the heart has to offer. There’s just so much to appreciate, from the bold color schemes (the highest of praises to the stained glass window in Kay’s room, the rainbow lighting in that one scene is immaculate) to the idyllic New England setting, full of swanky cocktail parties, cozy shops, and endearingly garish Christmas decorations (Cary’s tree might as well take up the whole living room); plus a vibrant cast of supporting characters to mine morsels of pointed humor from—geriatric Harvey, the rich busybody to end all rich busybodies in Mona, trustworthy Sara (Agnes Moorehead FTW), walking textbook Kay, always taking off her glasses to spout off some academic theory, and Ned, Cary's insufferable yuppie jerk son.

But above all else, the film belongs to Jane Wyman and Rock Hudson (Sirk too, obviously). Cary is such a lovely protagonist, trapped between personal interests and social norms, family and love. Just so easy to root for. And this time around I was acutely aware of how horny everything is—granted it was the 50s, this isn’t exactly peak De Palma territory, but Sirk made sure he got as much mileage out of Rock’s smoldering, chiseled face and 6’4” frame as he could. Instant attraction is a part of cinema, doubly so in the heightened playground of melodrama, but can you blame Cary for falling in love so quickly? I mean, look at that man!

As with previous viewings, I’m sure I looked like an idiot when the deer showed up at the end, sitting alone in the theater, smiling like a maniac. This nascent decade, let’s all give into our emotions and live the lives we deserve.

P.S. The shot of Cary crying in the window + the shot of Cary’s reflection on the TV!!!!!

Far From Heaven

What Carol is to winter, this is to fall; it opens on a tree in full autumnal bloom and never lets up, barraging viewers with one lush, period-specific detail after another, utilizing the season's emotive properties to accentuate a tale of transgressive love stifled by the suffocating mores of the time. It's a clear remix of All That Heaven Allows and Ali: Fear Eats the Soul, and while it's not quite on their level, the degree of separation isn't that large—Haynes does plenty of interesting things with the material, and his introduction of a gay subplot makes this a wholly unique affair. I forgot how bittersweet the ending is; there's a clear downward trajectory for the three couples at the heart of this cinematic triptych. Ron and Cary end up together in romantic bliss, Emmi and Ali end up together but with some compromises and the possibility of never-ending ulcers (yikes!), and here Cathy and Raymond are never even allowed a fair shot. Few tropes beat forlorn lovers looking at each other from opposite sides of a train window. And gee, is Elmer Bernstein's score amazing or what?!

Bless Their Little Hearts

Need to watch again to finalize my thoughts, I was kind of sleepy during the screening, but it's definitely amazing. A spiritual cousin to Killer of Sheep, the type of intimate black drama the powers that be don't want you to see, where black people are allowed to be three-dimensional characters with access to the full spectrum of humanity. We need more of these stories! There's a spousal argument that makes the much lauded Marriage Story scene look like child's play.
 

swoon

Member
Oct 25, 2017
276
Lots of great stuff, my favorite new watches were Sweet Smell, Raging Bull, and Bless Their Little Hearts. Got to see Charles Burnett in person at UCLA, so that was pretty cool.


Far From Heaven

What Carol is to winter, this is to fall; it opens on a tree in full autumnal bloom and never lets up, barraging viewers with one lush, period-specific detail after another, utilizing the season's emotive properties to accentuate a tale of transgressive love stifled by the suffocating mores of the time. It's a clear remix of All That Heaven Allows and Ali: Fear Eats the Soul, and while it's not quite on their level, the degree of separation isn't that large—Haynes does plenty of interesting things with the material, and his introduction of a gay subplot makes this a wholly unique affair. I forgot how bittersweet the ending is; there's a clear downward trajectory for the three couples at the heart of this cinematic triptych. Ron and Cary end up together in romantic bliss, Emmi and Ali end up together but with some compromises and the possibility of never-ending ulcers (yikes!), and here Cathy and Raymond are never even allowed a fair shot. Few tropes beat forlorn lovers looking at each other from opposite sides of a train window. And gee, is Elmer Bernstein's score amazing or what?!
whoa, what did burnett talk about?

i feel as much as people loved carol, no one went back and watched far from heaven which is bizarre.
 

swoon

Member
Oct 25, 2017
276
lol, i really loved wonderstruck - its ripe for rediscovery in a few years beautiful production.
 
May 24, 2019
3,619
I'm looking forward to Dark Waters (edit: When it comes to iTunes here. I don't think we got any type of theatrical release). Love the Ruff.
 

srsly?

Banned
Feb 24, 2018
3,701
Bless Their Little Hearts

Need to watch again to finalize my thoughts, I was kind of sleepy during the screening, but it's definitely amazing. A spiritual cousin to Killer of Sheep, the type of intimate black drama the powers that be don't want you to see, where black people are allowed to be three-dimensional characters with access to the full spectrum of humanity. We need more of these stories! There's a spousal argument that makes the much lauded Marriage Story scene look like child's play.
Although I perfectly understand the economics behind their decision, I was quite aggravated when I heard that, although Milestone has restored this underseen little gem and recently released it to DVD, they have no plans on issuing a blu-ray. This is what happens when consumers go throwing all the money after flashy hype, instead of rewarding unspectacular, but excellent character works like Woodberry's film.
 
Oct 27, 2017
2,093
whoa, what did burnett talk about?

i feel as much as people loved carol, no one went back and watched far from heaven which is bizarre.
Mostly about his time at the school (he intentionally completed credits slowly to stay in the program as long as possible lol because of the resources available) and as a mentor for the LA Rebellion. Lots of trouble securing financing, mentioned a funny anecdote where he told a producer he liked Denzel’s The Great Debaters and knew immediately that he ruined his chances based on their facial expression. Also mentioned how producers always say nobody wants stories like this, then every time he shows Killer of Sheep audiences love it and ask “why don’t they make movies like this?” The racial divide at UCLA as well, white students going to Topanga Canyon to film and stuff, how crazy it was to him that people would openly smoke weed because where he came from that was an automatic arrest.
 

bomma man

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,678
Didn't do this last month when I started posting, so:

1. What's your favourite Movie?

Because of the impact it had on my life and the way I see the world, probably Synecdoche New York. I haven't watched it in years and honestly kinda don't want to, because it was such a time and place thing for me.

2. Who's your favourite director?

Miyazaki, Haneke, Welles, Takahata, Anderson, Lynch, PTA, Leone, Verhoeven to name a few...

3. Who are your favourite actors/actresses?

It's such a case by case thing for me... I don't think I've ever watched something just because a certain actor is in it.

4. Favourite Genre(s)?

As far as capital G Genre movies go: Westerns, Adventures, Thrillers... pretty much anything aside from high fantasy, superheroes and musicals.

5. What's your favourite performance in film?

First few that come to mind are: Welles in The Third Man, Sheryl Lee in Fire Walk With Me, and Emmanuelle Riva in Amour (Best Actress that year was a fucking travesty - even more so than normal).

Letterboxd: https://letterboxd.com/bomma_man/

Top Five Three For Jan

1. Tokyo Story
2. M
3. Burning

Rewatches

N/A

Worst

JoJo Rabbit. Still a solid 3/5 I guess, but it was tonally all over the place, it wasn't particularly funny, and I don't think the Hitler character served the movie at all. Think it would've been better off playing it slightly straighter, but without the absurdist hook it'd just be another YA-level WWII story. You're never going to make anything better than If This Is A Man, don't even try.
 
Oct 27, 2017
2,093
Although I perfectly understand the economics behind their decision, I was quite aggravated when I heard that, although Milestone has restored this underseen little gem and recently released it to DVD, they have no plans on issuing a blu-ray. This is what happens when consumers go throwing all the money after flashy hype, instead of rewarding unspectacular, but excellent character works like Woodberry's film.
Yeah I really wish it and Killer of Sheep were on blu. Greatly appreciate all restorative efforts, but come on, DVD?? In 2020???
 

shaneo632

Member
Oct 29, 2017
14,129
Essex, UK
Watched 39 (!) films in January:

Top 5:
1. 1917
2. Star Trek: First Contact
3. Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan
4. Dark Waters
5. American Factory

Bottom 5:
1. Swept Away
2. The Murder of Nicole Brown Simpson
3. The Grudge
4. The Rhythm Section
5. Ni No Kuni
 

lazybones18

Member
Oct 25, 2017
7,152
Oscar Nominated Shorts: Documentary

Thankfully, I got to the theater in time to see the nominees. Unfortunately, I didn't fully see all of them. Learning to Skateboard went way too long and I lost interest near the end, resulting in me resting my eyes. Sadly, that tiredness carried over into In the Absence. Shame too, cause the subject matter for that was a real clusterfuck as well as heartbreaking. For the three that I fully watched (Life Overtakes Me, Walk Run Cha-Cha, St. Louis Superman), they were all great topics. I'm pulling for St. Louis Superman to win, and I really hope Bruce Franks will be able to recover from his aniexty. I do believe he could have did some good, even if it would have been a small difference,.

Oscar Nominated Shorts: Animation

Because of the runtime for the documentary nominees, I could only catch the last minute or two of Hair Love. I'll try to find another way of seeing it, but as of now, my faves were both Sister and Memorable. I'm leaning more towards wanting Memorable to win, primarily cause of the animation but I would also want Sister to win cause, again, of the subject matter. I'm not entirely sure why more animated shorts were shown after the five nominees but the more the merrier I suppose
 

balgajo

Member
Oct 27, 2017
891
Just saw Portrait of a Lady on Fire. Cried a river, but totally recommend it. Easily one of the best movies from 2019 imo.
 

Ether_Snake

Member
Oct 29, 2017
5,567
Police Python 357

A tough but honest cop must clear his name after a corrupt colleague implicates him in a murder in this French thriller. Ferrot (Yves Montand) is a hard-as-nails police detective who is attracted to a beautiful woman named Sylvia (Stefania Sandrelli). Sylvia, however, is having an affair with Ganay (Francois Perier), who happens to be Ferrot's superior on the force; Ganay happens to be married to Therese (Simone Signoret), who is handicapped. Sylvia is found murdered, and Ferrot is assigned to investigate; Ferrot is convinced that Ganay killed Sylvia because she wanted to end their relationship, but to his dismay, Ferrot discovers that the killer has placed a number of false clues that point the blame toward Ferrot. Police Python 357's brisk cutting earned editor Marie-Josephe Yoyotte a Cesar Award (the French Oscar).
Depressing movie where nothing goes right for the protagonist. As the movie enters its final 30 minutes you increasingly feel that there is no way he’ll make it out of the mess he’s in. Will he?
 

Deleted member 49179

User requested account closure
Banned
Oct 30, 2018
4,140
Uncut Gems

I never knew Adam Sandler had this in him. This movie was so intense and stressful, I had no idea what I was going into. And that ending...
 
Oct 27, 2017
15,814
Seattle
Saw the farewell last night. As a son of a Asian mother, I totally understood that pull between easy and West. It was sad, but also had funny moments and had interesting dynamics of family relationships
 

patientzero

Member
Oct 25, 2017
4,268
Captain Marvel - 3.5 stars
Defining Moment: The "one arm tied behind my back" moment, when Carol can fully indulge in those pesky "emotions" she's been told to hold at bay. What follows is a glorious indulgence, a woman coming into her own unrestricted by the edicts society considers proper. As Carol says, "I have nothing to prove to you."

Peter Pan - 2 stars
Defining Moment: When Peter rescues Tinkerbell after she rescues him from an explosive gift from Captain Hook, an exceedingly rare moment of growth and sacrifice in a movie that overwhelmingly offends the senses by implying all women are backstabbing homewreckers and the less said about its view of Native-Americans the better. That pixie-dusted golden, flying boat sure was pretty, though, right?

Jojo Rabbit - 4 stars
Defining Moment: A half-dozen moments involved Johansson's Rosie could qualify. There's the soot-created beard and reactions beyond. A suspended pair of shoes. Late night talks with a ghostly figure. But, the opening sequence scored by a German rendition of "I Want to Hold Your Hand", conflating Beatlemania and how fascism, in this case the Hitlerian model, coincides with hero worship is simultaneously precious and of the moment. Fascism relies on populism, and in 20th century populism it's difficult to find any more influential than Hitler and The Beatles.

Lady and the Tramp - 4 stars
Defining Moment: Is there any other answer that doesn't involve an errant strand of spaghetti and a duo of troubadouring Italian immigrants? In a surprisingly quick scene lies a culmination of one of Disney's greatest love stories and an embrace of the culturally downtrodden.

Bombshell - 1.5 stars

Defining Moment: Early on, there's a scene between Robbie's ambitious, lesbian-cum-Christian intern and McKinnon's Hillary-loving but Fox-working subordinate, where we see a glimpse of how fractured identities navigate a binary world. There's a damned interesting story there, one much larger than the eventual takedown of a single man. But our film doubles-down on the man, not the system.
 
25 films logged in January. This was a very rewatch-heavy month for me, highlighted in particular by going through a lot of Saoirse Ronan's filmography again.

Top 5 new viewings
1. Uncut Gems (2019)
2. 1917 (2019)
3. They Live By Night (1948)
4. A Very Long Engagement (2004)
5. Show Boat (1936)

Top 5 repeat viewings
1. Mad Max: Fury Road (2015)
2. The Grand Budapest Hotel (2014)
3. Atonement (2007)
4. Sunset Boulevard (1950)
5. Little Women (2019)

Uncut Gems (2019): Adam Sandler gives his best performance ever, and certainly my favourite of his "serious role" films, even if I think it's perhaps not quite as good as the Sadfies' earlier Good Time. They're building quite a little niche for themselves.

Wuthering Heights (1939): After finishing with the book, I watched the most famous film adaptation, starring Merle Oberon and Laurence Olivier. Chops off the second half of the story, which benefits Heathcliff's relative likability quite a lot, since that's where he goes full supervillain. Oberon is an actress whose story I've heard, but I'd never seen any of her film; she's quite compelling, it's a shame she didn't appear in more films that are widely-remembered. Directed by William Wyler, has a very good sense of atmosphere; and there are some pretty decent child actors in this, which is a miracle for the period.

In This Our Life (1942): John Huston's followup to directing The Maltese Falcon was this Bette Davis/Olivia de Havilland melodrama about two sisters (guess which of them is the bad one?). I'd heard about this recently when listening to Karina Longworth's podcast episode about Hattie McDaniel, who has a relatively small supporting role here, as this is one of the very few studio films of the period to touch on racism and injustice in the criminal law system toward black people. The last act is pretty strong, but the movie doesn't have much in the way of narrative momentum before that.

Darling (1965): Julie Christie wins an Oscar for this portrayal of a stylish Mod era model who coasts through various different social sets becoming bored and unfulfilled. Feels like it's trying to be an English version of La Dolce Vita in a number of ways, but I thought that was dull as well, and John Schlesinger doesn't have Fellini's gift for visuals.