Movies You've Seen Recently | February 2020

More_Badass

Member
Oct 25, 2017
17,950
Watched two very different portrayals of medieval desperation among the Black Death

The Navigator: A Medieval Odyssey (1988)
★★★★
A Medieval Odyssey is an apt subtitle. The Navigator truly feels like a harrowing mythic journey, grim and folksy and heightened. Desperate medieval adventurers tunnel to the far end of the world as death approaches upon leathery wings, a grim monochrome escape from the Black Death. Like Dorothy stepping into Oz, they emerge in an otherworldly land of color and metal, towering spires and confounding mechanisms: ‘1980s Auckland.

What could easily have been comedic out-of-time misadventures is handled with the curiosity and caution of a fantasy epic. A roaring highway is as impassable and deadly as raging rapids. A submarine looms like a nautical terror from the depths. New reports on AIDs and nuclear threat mirror the crier’s omens of bubonic pestilence. The Navigator portrays the modern cityscape as a sprawling surreal frontier to overcome, the old world as a rugged land of superstition and dread. Visually striking and fairytale-like in its larger-than-life storytelling, The Navigator is a unique medieval adventure that never sheds its perspective of fantastical nightmare even among the glass and metal of today.

Flesh + Blood (1985)
★★★½
There may be no better showcase of Verhoeven’s devilish playful eye for the morbid and grotesque than a scene of classic medieval romanticism - complete with soft melodramatic score - while putrid corpses encroach upon the frame.

Flesh+Blood contains ample amounts of both, but Verhoeven’s mixture of exploitation sleaze and commentary isn’t as balanced as in his future films. His use of sexual violence and unabashed brigandry certainly is effective in portraying a plague-ridden remorseless medieval landscape; however, the movie feels too crass and indulgent for the themes of power, religion, and masculinity to take root. Rutger Hauer and Jennifer Jason Leigh shine as both play their own games of shrewd manipulation to survive, superstition and sex as their respective avenues of control. But outside of those two, the cast and production has a cheap vibe that mirrors Flesh+Blood’s b-movie core.
 

swoon

Member
Oct 25, 2017
276
Mostly about his time at the school (he intentionally completed credits slowly to stay in the program as long as possible lol because of the resources available) and as a mentor for the LA Rebellion. Lots of trouble securing financing, mentioned a funny anecdote where he told a producer he liked Denzel’s The Great Debaters and knew immediately that he ruined his chances based on their facial expression. Also mentioned how producers always say nobody wants stories like this, then every time he shows Killer of Sheep audiences love it and ask “why don’t they make movies like this?” The racial divide at UCLA as well, white students going to Topanga Canyon to film and stuff, how crazy it was to him that people would openly smoke weed because where he came from that was an automatic arrest.
thanks for the write-up. i guess it's great that amazon picked up a film of his, but it's a shame we lost out on some great creative years from him.
 

swoon

Member
Oct 25, 2017
276
Flesh + Blood (1985)
★★★½
There may be no better showcase of Verhoeven’s devilish playful eye for the morbid and grotesque than a scene of classic medieval romanticism - complete with soft melodramatic score - while putrid corpses encroach upon the frame.

Flesh+Blood contains ample amounts of both, but Verhoeven’s mixture of exploitation sleaze and commentary isn’t as balanced as in his future films. His use of sexual violence and unabashed brigandry certainly is effective in portraying a plague-ridden remorseless medieval landscape; however, the movie feels too crass and indulgent for the themes of power, religion, and masculinity to take root. Rutger Hauer and Jennifer Jason Leigh shine as both play their own games of shrewd manipulation to survive, superstition and sex as their respective avenues of control. But outside of those two, the cast and production has a cheap vibe that mirrors Flesh+Blood’s b-movie core.
fourth man is shockingly great and in the same vein as flesh+blood as a deconstruction of the thriller genre
 

Ravelle

Member
Oct 31, 2017
6,910
Joker

I liked it.

The pacing could have been trimmed a bit and there were some leaps of logic and on the nose messages.

Phoenix is a fantastic Joker and it was a bummer we only got to see only a small moment of him as the joker.
 
Oct 27, 2017
15,867
Seattle
Florida Project:

Sometimes I watch a movie, and try to figure out...Where is this story going. At the end of the movie, I figured out, the point was the journey, not the end. I really enjoyed the back and forth between the kids just roaming and being kids (Was this more common back in my day? Just roaming the neighborhood with your friends from 8am to 9pm) and then come back to the realities of being an adult and trying to struggle to take care of your child. It was heart breaking, but the very end with Moonie and her friend was great.

Oh and William Defoe did an amazing job as the 'Father/Grandfather' figure/manager person.
 
Oct 27, 2017
15,867
Seattle
I was looking at renting the lighthouse at redbox..and saw it had two stars.

These reviews....are a trip:





Boring. I slept through most of it. Completely black & white, depressing, and absolutely "going nowhere". The end.


It was interesting but a little too high brow for me. If you like avant garde films, then you might appreciate it.

Just weird and wasted time waiting for it to get better. Not much of a story line...
 

Psychoward

Member
Nov 7, 2017
24,561
Finally seeing Uncut Gems tonight and pretty excited, might rent JoJo Rabbit after as well

Edit: wait Jojo isn't available to rent digitally yet? What.
 

hydruxo

Member
Oct 25, 2017
6,499
Florida Project:

Sometimes I watch a movie, and try to figure out...Where is this story going. At the end of the movie, I figured out, the point was the journey, not the end. I really enjoyed the back and forth between the kids just roaming and being kids (Was this more common back in my day? Just roaming the neighborhood with your friends from 8am to 9pm) and then come back to the realities of being an adult and trying to struggle to take care of your child. It was heart breaking, but the very end with Moonie and her friend was great.

Oh and William Defoe did an amazing job as the 'Father/Grandfather' figure/manager person.
Florida Project is fantastic. One of my favorites of the last few years. The way they captured the vibe of that part of Orlando right on the edge of Disney World is so spot on. I don't think the movie would've worked as well if it weren't for Brooklyn Prince's performance though, they really hit the lottery with her as Moonee. Her playfulness and innocence makes it all the more heartbreaking when her reality is shattered by what's going on with her mom.
 
Oct 27, 2017
15,867
Seattle
Florida Project is fantastic. One of my favorites of the last few years. The way they captured the vibe of that part of Orlando right on the edge of Disney World is so spot on. I don't think the movie would've worked as well if it weren't for Brooklyn Prince's performance though, they really hit the lottery with her as Moonee. Her playfulness and innocence makes it all the more heartbreaking when her reality is shattered by what's going on with her mom.
I notice Brooklynn's career has taken off! and the Mom? This was her first acting job? I couldn't tell. She was also good.
 

Disco

Member
Oct 25, 2017
6,568
I was looking at renting the lighthouse at redbox..and saw it had two stars.

These reviews....are a trip:





Boring. I slept through most of it. Completely black & white, depressing, and absolutely "going nowhere". The end.


It was interesting but a little too high brow for me. If you like avant garde films, then you might appreciate it.

Just weird and wasted time waiting for it to get better. Not much of a story line...
I thought these were your impressions at first and was about to hit you with the hhh scust gif
 

Blader

Member
Oct 27, 2017
13,052
Mike Wallace Is Here
Surprised with how good this was. Figured it would be a cradle to grave doc, but takes a more interesting framing approach to getting out a lot of the same information you'd expect from this sort of thin: how his career started, what drove him to television first and then journalism later, the origin of 60 Minutes, running down some of their biggest stories, fears, regrets, traumas, what made Mike Wallace tick, etc. But the film is really slickly made, and while they have a fascinating subject to profile, the actual filmmaking craft makes Wallace's story all the more absorbing. I also left this feeling a shred of sympathy for Chris Wallace; growing up with this guy as a dad had to have been really shitty. (edit: I've since learned that Chris Wallace did not grow up with Mike as his father, so I rescind my sympathy.)
8/10

Uncut Gems

Not as good as advertised, and then suddenly, as good as advertised. The movie walks a fine line between tense and annoying for a while, but as it starts building toward its climax lands firmly in the tense camp. This is reinforced in everything from the everyone's-shouting-all-the-time performances to the camerawork to especially the music, a series of discordant synths that keep piling on top of each other, threatening to annoy you away from the screen but in the end manage to skirt that and instead continue escalating the drama and anxiety of Howard's terrible life choices. This is true of Sandler's performance too: borderline obnoxious for a while, and then very captivating. KG is also great.
8/10

I also watched Dear Basketball on Sunday, which tbh was just ok. Writing feels super indulgent and yet I don't doubt Kobe's sincerity about it. Watching it made me feel bummed again, which was basically the point.
 
Oct 27, 2017
2,095
Paddington

Hugh Bonneville MVP

Paddington 2

All right boys and girls, we're never dissing live action/CGI hybrid family films again, got that?

A more assured, hard-hitting production compared to its already pretty-darn-good predecessor, and it's evident from the jump, best exemplified by the jaw-dropping pop-up book sequence that happens early on, which is not only brilliantly inventive and stunning to look at (can't remember the last time CGI floored me like that, would absolutely watch a feature length movie in that style, love those pigeons), but expertly saccharine without ever feeling cloying. As an adaptation of beloved children's literature, the themes aren't exactly the deepest in the world, but director Paul King doesn't use that as a crutch; every emotional beat in this wholesome masterwork is thoroughly earned, right up until the heartwarming final frame. Yes, you better believe I shed a tear or two or four for a couple of CGI bears hugging it out.

The pop-up book is also emblematic of another of the film's strengths: the tactile feel that every wonderfully composed room has, so full of vibrant colors and myriad objects. This extends to the first as well, the set designers went above and beyond. I've been playing Luigi's Mansion 3, and that game essentially boils down to going from one densely packed room to the next; I can't help but want to do the same with this movie.

I also love how inclusive and diverse this is without ever drawing attention to itself/trying to score faux woke points. London is as diverse a city as there is. Naturally black and brown faces are going to dot the landscape, but unless I'm remembering incorrectly, I don't believe the first was like this. It's a clear refutation of Brexit and it's all the better for it. Love thy neighbor!

The cast is once again uniformly excellent, I would give my life for the Browns. And though I missed Nicole Kidman's dommy presence, as a fan of Hugh Grant since I saw About a Boy as a 10 year old, what a treat he is as a vain, self-obsessed thespian. His musical number during the credits put a huge smile on my face. Plus, Brendan Gleeson as Knuckles McGinty. That's all that needs to be said.

I may be underrating this. I mean, it's a family film AND a prison film. Who else could pull this off?
 

n8 dogg

Member
Oct 25, 2017
625
^ paddington 2 is one of the best films i’ve ever seen. Pure fuckin masterpiece. Grant for best actor of the century imho

Ford vs Ferrari

so mediocre i'm amazed that enough people said this was their favourite movie of the year for it to crack a best picture race. it's not bad by any stretch of the imagination. it's just so milquetoast, so inoffensive, so cliched, so particularly lacking in any originality or anything interesting to say whatsoever. some decent performances from bale and damon (and the gawd tracy letts) but it's all well within their wheelhouse, no sense of challenge to their work.

calling this a dad movie is offensive to dads everywhere. this is a grandad movie. it’s competently made and fairly boring. just a dull telling of a potentially good story. even the race scenes are pretty bleh. Rush did it better. Speed racer did it better. This is just talladega nights without the laughs

also props to the music supervisor for orchestrating the most cliched soundtrack of all time

still better than joker/10
 

ViewtifulJC

Member
Oct 25, 2017
15,701
Of all the movies nominated for Best Picture this year, FvF confuses me the most. Like even with worse movies like Joker or Jojo those films had a personality that a lot of people connected with, god help them. FvF seemed to exist exclusively in the “yep that was fine” zone. It seemed made to be seen on TV, about halfway through but you follow along anyway. At least 5% of the academy thought it was the best of the year? Not like Parasite or Uncut Gems or whatever? Yeah aight
 

Psychoward

Member
Nov 7, 2017
24,561
^ paddington 2 is one of the best films i’ve ever seen. Pure fuckin masterpiece. Grant for best actor of the century imho

Ford vs Ferrari

so mediocre i'm amazed that enough people said this was their favourite movie of the year for it to crack a best picture race. it's not bad by any stretch of the imagination. it's just so milquetoast, so inoffensive, so cliched, so particularly lacking in any originality or anything interesting to say whatsoever. some decent performances from bale and damon (and the gawd tracy letts) but it's all well within their wheelhouse, no sense of challenge to their work.

calling this a dad movie is offensive to dads everywhere. this is a grandad movie. it’s competently made and fairly boring. just a dull telling of a potentially good story. even the race scenes are pretty bleh. Rush did it better. Speed racer did it better. This is just talladega nights without the laughs

also props to the music supervisor for orchestrating the most cliched soundtrack of all time

still better than joker/10
Ford v Ferrari is a much much better film than Speed Racer because it's actually somewhat ok outside of the racing.

But yeah it getting a nom over The Lighthouse etc. Is hilarious

Also in the theater for Uncut Gems and got told I had to leave my water outside,n that's the first time that's happened to me in 5+ years wtf
 

n8 dogg

Member
Oct 25, 2017
625
Of all the movies nominated for Best Picture this year, FvF confuses me the most. Like even with worse movies like Joker or Jojo those films had a personality that a lot of people connected with, god help them. FvF seemed to exist exclusively in the “yep that was fine” zone. It seemed made to be seen on TV, about halfway through but you follow along anyway. At least 5% of the academy thought it was the best of the year? Not like Parasite or Uncut Gems or whatever? Yeah aight
Yeah; like loads of people would have fucking hated Gems, but just as many would have loved it

Amazed anyone loved this. Or hated it. Or thought anything other than ‘vanilla movie bitch’
 

swoon

Member
Oct 25, 2017
276
Paddington

Hugh Bonneville MVP

Paddington 2

All right boys and girls, we're never dissing live action/CGI hybrid family films again, got that?

A more assured, hard-hitting production compared to its already pretty-darn-good predecessor, and it's evident from the jump, best exemplified by the jaw-dropping pop-up book sequence that happens early on, which is not only brilliantly inventive and stunning to look at (can't remember the last time CGI floored me like that, would absolutely watch a feature length movie in that style, love those pigeons), but expertly saccharine without ever feeling cloying. As an adaptation of beloved children's literature, the themes aren't exactly the deepest in the world, but director Paul King doesn't use that as a crutch; every emotional beat in this wholesome masterwork is thoroughly earned, right up until the heartwarming final frame. Yes, you better believe I shed a tear or two or four for a couple of CGI bears hugging it out.

The pop-up book is also emblematic of another of the film's strengths: the tactile feel that every wonderfully composed room has, so full of vibrant colors and myriad objects. This extends to the first as well, the set designers went above and beyond. I've been playing Luigi's Mansion 3, and that game essentially boils down to going from one densely packed room to the next; I can't help but want to do the same with this movie.

I also love how inclusive and diverse this is without ever drawing attention to itself/trying to score faux woke points. London is as diverse a city as there is. Naturally black and brown faces are going to dot the landscape, but unless I'm remembering incorrectly, I don't believe the first was like this. It's a clear refutation of Brexit and it's all the better for it. Love thy neighbor!

The cast is once again uniformly excellent, I would give my life for the Browns. And though I missed Nicole Kidman's dommy presence, as a fan of Hugh Grant since I saw About a Boy as a 10 year old, what a treat he is as a vain, self-obsessed thespian. His musical number during the credits put a huge smile on my face. Plus, Brendan Gleeson as Knuckles McGinty. That's all that needs to be said.

I may be underrating this. I mean, it's a family film AND a prison film. Who else could pull this off?
it is easily one of the best films of the decade. and it also does the thing wes anderson can't do which is to actually take a stance about the world inside of its handmade aesthetic.
 

Net_Wrecker

Member
Oct 25, 2017
2,123
Wes Anderson takes a stance, what

I'd be hard pressed to name another director who so passionately puts white culture on display
 
Oct 25, 2017
12,200
I saw Terminator: Dark Fate. It was fine as in to say I was entertained throughout.
I didn’t give a shit about the John Connor thing either. I love the first two movies but I guess not enough to feel outraged by what this one did.
 

swoon

Member
Oct 25, 2017
276
Wes Anderson takes a stance, what

I'd be hard pressed to name another director who so passionately puts white culture on display
Do you think he thinks that? Do you really think he understands why darjeeling is problematic. For all his attention to visual detail he doesn't have that to characters and the political world. Paddington def does both well.
 

Net_Wrecker

Member
Oct 25, 2017
2,123
Do you think he thinks that? Do you really think he understands why darjeeling is problematic. For all his attention to visual detail he doesn't have that to characters and the political world. Paddington def does both well.
Oh see the issue is you thought i came to this discussion in good faith. I just saw an opening. Apologies.

Paddington 2 is a complete delight, more well rounded than most of Anderson's work, and a better movie than most directors can make on their best day. You'll find no real argument from me.
 

Psychoward

Member
Nov 7, 2017
24,561
Yeah; like loads of people would have fucking hated Gems, but just as many would have loved it

Amazed anyone loved this. Or hated it. Or thought anything other than ‘vanilla movie bitch’
I just came out of gems and I neither loved it or hated it.

Liked Good Time more but this still ok.
 
Oct 27, 2017
2,095
Uncut is better because the tension actually works. Could not give a flying fuck what happens to Connie, so Good Time falls flat
 

More_Badass

Member
Oct 25, 2017
17,950
Jallikattu is on Prime, and it was totally worth the wait. ‪Microcosmic allegory for mankind’s innate bestial nature?‬ Mad Cow “Climax”?‬ Either way, Jallikattu is a stunning hurricane of rabid masculinity, primal aggression, mud, blood, violence, and man vs man vs nature at its most frenzied‬. An escaped buffalo tramples the thin veneer of village civility to dust, as every petty squabble and animalistic urge is unleashed amid the mad pursuit of the animal. It all builds to one of the most gloriously climactic, visually-thematic, and visceral escalations I’ve seen in a while.

‪There were a few sequences that reminded me of Edgar Wright in their editing, energetic synchronized montages of pulsing primal audio and actions‬

And if Indian cinema usually gives you pause:
- only 95 minutes
- no musical numbers or non sequiturs

 
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bomma man

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,696
Uncut Gems reminded me a lot of Bad Lieutenant, which surely can’t be a coincidence? Somehow, Sandler was less of a fuck up than Harvey Kietel though.
 
Oct 27, 2017
2,095
I watched Ace in the Hole today and the entire time I was thinking, wow I can’t believe Kirk Douglas is still alive....
 

balgajo

Member
Oct 27, 2017
899
Considering that I love animations but really disliked Paddington 1 would you people recommend me the sequel?
 

srsly?

Member
Feb 24, 2018
3,734
The first hour+ of Until the End of the World was so tedious, I shut it off. For the most part, Wenders' films are too goofy and self-important for my tastes.
 

overcast

Member
Oct 25, 2017
8,455
Uncut is better because the tension actually works. Could not give a flying fuck what happens to Connie, so Good Time falls flat
I feel like you’re supposed to care about Connie’s brother which is why I dug Good Time more. Gonna rewatch Uncut next Monday night though. Feel like I went in a bit overhyped
 

andrew

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,354
Everyone talking about Paddington got me to watch the second one last night and yep that’s a great movie, better than the first. Paddington is adorable and hilarious and Hugh Bonneville slays me, plus the story is once again radical and thoughtful for a family film. Leftist alternative media, prison reform, fun for kids of all ages
 

Peru

Member
Oct 26, 2017
2,628
Parasite and Little Women are finally in wide release over here and I watched both of em today.

Both were great, I thought. But as a big Bong-head that had sort of built up the idea that Parasite would be the undeniable MOTY I still had to accept that I liked Little Women even more.

Parasite is great, an amazing ensemble performance, funny script, elegant execution. It's great. It's Bong. I could definitely see where it was headed, but that doesn't really matter. Park So Dam playing on so many strings in this thing.

Little Women overwhelmed me. Felt to me like one of the best adapted screenplays I've ever seen performed. Immediately we meet these actors at their most glowingly charismatic. I think Gerwig has quickly become the actors' director to beat - the pure warmth of the portrayals, while still so artless and casual. And yeah that screenplay, I think she shows immense restraint but still manages to re-invent the story and modernize it, through structure and simple character shifts. Just the absolute perfect adaptation of this book. Classic.
 
Oct 27, 2017
2,095
Everyone talking about Paddington got me to watch the second one last night and yep that’s a great movie, better than the first. Paddington is adorable and hilarious and Hugh Bonneville slays me, plus the story is once again radical and thoughtful for a family film. Leftist alternative media, prison reform, fun for kids of all ages
Hugh is so good in the movies. As someone who only knew him from Downton Abbey, I was really shocked at his comedic chops. Makes me wish more people were cast against type, though maybe he has a history in comedy that I’m unaware of.
 
Oct 27, 2017
15,867
Seattle
Watched Mid90's pretty good debut by jonah hill. I tend to like coming of age movies. This 13 year old kid coming into his own and figuring out how he fits with everything, falls into a skater group.

I loved the music, and then saw it was by Trent reznor and Atticus Ross.
 

andrew

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,354
Hugh is so good in the movies. As someone who only knew him from Downton Abbey, I was really shocked at his comedic chops. Makes me wish more people were cast against type, though maybe he has a history in comedy that I’m unaware of.
I've never seen Downton so he was completely unknown to me outside of the Paddington movies. I went to see if I could find anything else he's in to try and looks like he's a workhorse and has had a hundred UK film and tv credits usually in minor supporting roles. down to hosting stuff like this public TV documentary about Jesus's last days?

Nothing I see has him up front and center which is a shame because he has sharpshooter comedic timing.
 

n8 dogg

Member
Oct 25, 2017
625
I've never seen Downton so he was completely unknown to me outside of the Paddington movies. I went to see if I could find anything else he's in to try and looks like he's a workhorse and has had a hundred UK film and tv credits usually in minor supporting roles. down to hosting stuff like this public TV documentary about Jesus's last days?

Nothing I see has him up front and center which is a shame because he has sharpshooter comedic timing.
The bit on the train at the end when the yoga kicks in is incredible
 

Darkwing-Buck

Member
Oct 25, 2017
13,221
Los Angeles, CA
Fail Safe (1964) Directed by. Sidney Lumet

Criminally underappreciated cold war thriller by the master himself, Sidney Lumet. Sadly underrated due to its connection to Kubrick’s Dr. Strangelove and the drama of these two having similar stories.

While Strangelove dabbles brilliance in the comedy genre, Fail-Safe grounds its approach to nuclear warfare in the ’60s.

Lumet takes the template of 12 Angry Men (Static Characters and a lack of soundtrack) and raises the stakes.

Impressive how terrifying it was despite not having to rely on bombastic imagery and instead depends on its performances and directing.

I can’t recommend this enough. Fonda puts on a hell of a performance as the president and it was such a pleasant surprise to see Dan O’ Herlihy in this. (OCP Chairman from Robocop)

 
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Rhomega

Member
Oct 25, 2017
2,476
Arizona
Dirty Harry: Solid cop movie where Clint Eastwood plays a loose cannon cop on the edge who doesn't play by the rules. There's a good villain who knows how to play the game. And of course there's the famous "Do I feel lucky?" bit.
 
Oct 27, 2017
2,095
Army of Shadows

What a remarkable film this is, subverting the scrappy underdog narrative typically ascribed to resistance fighters, where even in the darkest of times hope is all you need (Star Wars is the most basic example of this), in favor of a more fatalistic approach, blurring the lines between heroism and villainy. Of course when your opposition is The Third Reich, inevitably you fall on the side of the good guys, but Melville uses every trick in his well-calibrated arsenal to deconstruct the romantic notion of resistance. The whole thing is just one act of survival after another, a mad scramble towards an unknowable finish line tinged with paranoia and weariness. Even the recurring theme strikes me as more of a countdown than a score. And the one character allowed a sort of larger-than-life aura, Madame Mathilde, master of disguise and strategist extraordinaire (and easily the most likable of the lot), is snuffed out in a despicable act of betrayal that, as the final moments reveal, was absolutely not worth it. But hey, the Nazis lost eventually right?

The only other Melville I've seen is Le Samourai, one of the foremost progenitors of "Cool Cinema", and though this film lacks Alain Delon's chiseled mug, the rest is here: the slow-boil tension, the stylish framing, the icy color palette and emotional wavelength. I like how the French flag really pops on screen in contrast to how muted everything else is; same goes for Luc Jardie's philosophy books, with their tricolor binding. It lends a vaguely ethereal glow to them, really selling their sacredness. I also appreciate how, for lack of a better descriptor, un-Hollywood the entire cast looks. Jean-Pierre Cassel is the most handsome of the bunch (there's even a line about it), but even he isn't a drop-dead knockout (ala Delon). It just seems more believable that way. Last thing I want to mention are the few moments of solidarity that cut through the gelid veneer, small tokens of warmth that remind us what we're fighting for: the club scene in London, where people dance the night away despite an ongoing aerial raid, much to Gerbier's bewilderment; the brilliant scene right before the firing squad where prisoners pass Gerbier's cigarette carton around for one last smoke; and perhaps my favorite scene of the film, when Gerbier gets a shave after escaping the Gestapo and the barber offers him a new jacket, saying "It's not very smart, but it's all I have." Perhaps hope is all we need!
 

Creamium

Member
Oct 25, 2017
7,004
Belgium
Ford v Ferrari: not that into cars, so I gave this shot just because of all the positive reactions I read about it... Glad I did because it was a big surprise for me. First off the race shots are phenomenal, got sweaty hands just from watching. It's not just the Le Mans shots, even the test laps felt exhilarating. When old man Ford broke down... yeah they sold that, I believed that. Wish I'd watched this in the theatre because of all these stunning shots. Then there's the chemistry between Damon and Bale, the latter in particular was having so much fun with this part. Even the scenes with his kid came off as authentic and avoided being too corny. Soundtrack was ace too, I loved this all the way through.
 

bomma man

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,696
The Sweet Smell Of Success fucking rules. Cinematography, script, score, and especially the acting (Burt Lancaster’s JJ is genuinely terrifying) are all excellent. For a hollywood movie from 1957 it’s genuinely surprising how unsympathetic and contemptible the protagonist is, and how cynical its world view is. While the details of the plot are somewhat alien to modern eyes, the themes, which include the media abusing its power to gatekeep information for immoral ends, are prescient.

As good as a noir you’ll ever see, all without a single gun being fired.
 

AcidCat

Member
Oct 27, 2017
1,282
Bellingham WA
Have to say Parasite was a bit of a letdown after all the hype. Not bad by any means but was ready for it to be over about a half hour before it finally ended. Snowpiercer was far more entertaining.