Movies You've Seen Recently | May 2019

Divius

Member
Oct 25, 2017
629
The Netherlands
Welcome
Hello and welcome to the monthly Movies You've Seen Recently thread. The place to hang out with fellow movie lovers!

Thread rules
1. Be nice, be civil, use common sense
2. Respect the opinions of other members, no matter how wrong they are
3. Use spoiler tags accordingly
4. Have fun, we’re all here because we love movies

DO NOT just post the title of the movie you watched. It isn't conducive to the kind of discussion & communication we want to engender here, because it tells us nothing of you, the movie, the impact of the latter on the former. Post scores, descriptions, essays, poems, gifs, hashtags, whatever provides you the best outlet for personal expression, you unique little digital snowflake. - icarus-daedelus
Want to introduce yourself?
New to the Movies You've Seen Recently community? Let us know a bit about yourself:
1. What's your favorite Movie?
2. Who's your favorite director?
3. Who are your favorite actors/actresses?
4. Favorite Genre(s)?
5. What's your favorite performance in film?
- Post your top 5 new viewings from the previous month!

Useful external links:
Letterboxd
ICheckMovies
IMDb
Rotten Tomatoes
Metacritic

Also check out the official Film Era discord!
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List of Movies you've seen recently members on letterboxd said:
If you want to be added to the list above, shoot me a PM and you'll be added.

Unsure of what to watch? Just ask for recommendations in here. We don’t bite!
 
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Kegels

Member
Jan 24, 2019
1,012
endgame — 8/10 maybe 8.5. Infinity War was a riskier movie (let the villain be the center) but endgame capped the series off well and was masterful fan service. I’m kind of fatigued with MCU after it, but they have some movies coming down the slate that i’m still interested in. Can’t see myself paying to watch any new heroes though. Think they would be better off “backdoor piloting” those new movies, like how they introduced BP in civil war and then he got his solo film.
 
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Divius

Divius

Member
Oct 25, 2017
629
The Netherlands
I've logged 19 entries for films during April 2019.

TOP 5 NEW VIEWINGS OF APRIL
5. <nothing really>
4. Beyond a Reasonable Doubt
3. Through a Glass Darkly
2. A New Leaf
1. High Life

MOST VALUABLE REWATCHES OF APRIL
The Lion King

WORST NEW VIEWING OF APRIL
The Silence, Dead Air
 
Feb 10, 2018
11,113
Endgame - 8/10
It started off a bit slow and I think it spent a bit to long with the avengers in depression Mode. Also the comedy angle of fat depress thor and hybrid hulk/banner felt kinda out of place, yes all MCU movies have there funny one liners, but fat thor was a bit much. However with those nit picks out of the way the time travel aspects cool and the "endgame" was a worthy finale.

Baywatch 2018
I knew what I was getting into, and even though it was more silly + clinical then I was expecting, I still had a blast watching it. It was a simple plot reminiscent of the original series but on steroids and with some goofy comedy + action from the rock and efron.
7/10
 

Kendall

Banned
Apr 22, 2019
490
1. What's your favorite Movie?
Hard to pin point a favorite. My favorite one is usually just the last good one I saw. I just like good movies?

John Wick, Tarantino movies, and Pan's Labyrinth stand out in recent memory suppose. Although that'll change as the years go on.

2. Who's your favorite director?
Guillermo del Toro and Tarantino

3. Who are your favorite actors/actresses?
Steve Buscemi, Brad Dourif

4. Favorite Genre(s)?
Horror

5. What's your favorite performance in film?
Tom Hardy in The Revenant


- Post your top 5 new viewings from the previous month
I watched the First three Leprechaun movies and first two Nightmare on Elm Street movies recently. Also Shazam, Cult of Chucky, and Big Fish.
 

Zousi

Member
Oct 31, 2017
109
33 films logged for films during April. Top 5 new watches:

1. Andrei Rublev (1966)
2. Cul-de-sac (1966)
3. Avengers: Endgame (2019)
4. Big Bad Mama (1974)
5. The Fortune Cookie (1966... again!)
 
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Kazura

Member
Sep 30, 2018
1,013
Watched a lot less movies this month because I started rewatching Game Of Thrones for some reason and it's taking up all of my TV time. Logged 16 films on Letterboxd

Liked these the most:
Fish Tank (2009) - From the director of American Honey. It fucking ruled so hard. Loved it 4.5/5
Dragged Across Concrete (2018) From the director of Bone Tomahawk/Brawl in cell block 99. It ruled, and hard. Really liked it 4/5
Life Is Sweet (1990) - Naked is one of the best movies I watched in recent memory and this was very different but great in its own right. Wonderful movie 4/5
Me And Earl and The Dying Girl (2015) - Just a nice coming of age story. Kind of cheesy in some parts but I really enjoyed it 4/5
Clarie's Knee (1970) - It was beautiful visually and I think it was a good introduction to French cinema for me. Really liked it 4/5
Day Of The Dead (1985) - This is the one that everyone hates? It's easily my favorite of the trilogy... 4/5
Deep End (1970) - Such a weird movie. I was intrigued by the premise and it was very different from what I expected, and I loved it for that. Jane Asher is so beautiful holy shit 4/5

Liked these the least:
Two-Lane Blacktop (1971) - Such a boreeeeee 3/5
Star Wars The Last Jedi (2017) - I think I convinced myself to like it more than I actually did just to spite the psycho haters, but now a few weeks removed I'm changing my rating from 3.5 to 3. It really did suck
The French Connection (1971) - Love The Exorcist and I watched Sorcerer last month and thought it was amazing but this, no, it was boring as hell sorry 3/5
 

Pachimari

Member
Oct 25, 2017
9,424
April was probably my weakest month in 3 years.

New Watches:
1. Avengers: Endgame

Rewatches:
1. Guardians of the Galaxy
2. Avengers: Infinity War
3. Doctor Strange

Now that Endgame is over with, it's time for me to get back into other genres and kick off my year of film watching.
 

Released

Member
Oct 27, 2017
162
I got 45 in for April

Favorite New Watches:
1. Bonnie and Clyde
2. The Godfather Part II
3. Barton Fink
4. Inside Llewyn Davis
5. Blood Simple

Favorite Rewatch:
Lady Bird (gosh dang I love this movie)

As you can maybe tell, I've been trying to see all the Coen brothers' films I've never gotten around to watching. It's been a fun trip, and I still have a few more to go.
 

Fancy Clown

Member
Oct 25, 2017
2,533
Only watched 5 movies in April and only one new watch was worthy enough to make a top 5 list: A Hard Day’s Night, which is a pretty wonderful French New Wave style day in the life of The Beatles running around like gremlins who have been fed after midnight being dickheads to everyone, set to the of course great soundtrack of the album of the same name.
 

More_Badass

Member
Oct 25, 2017
15,486
All Is Lost
★★★★
After the one-two punch of Endgame and Game of Thrones, I wanted to enjoy a smaller-scale palate cleanser and All Is Lost fits that definition very well. Much like the recent Arctic, All Is Lost is a survival movie at its most minimalist. It's an old man versus the harsh sea, a deliberately-paced display of skill and determination against the unceasing hardships of nature. From the first scene, the movie drops us into an atmosphere of urgent survival, and then precedes to pile one challenge after another atop an already bad situation.

Despite such a limited setting, All Is Lost cleverly keeps the struggle varied and engaging, through the deteriorating state of the boat throughout the film and how the movie balances a sense of claustrophobia with the terrifyingly vast isolation of the open ocean. But the star of the movie, by virtue of being the only person present, is Robert Redford. He is completely convincing as a practiced seaman, approaching each new hardship with ingenuity and knowledge, but also feels vulnerable and human through his body language and performance.

Steve Jobs
★★★★½
I have an iPhone and iPad but I have about zero interest in Apple, Steve Jobs, and that industry beyond mobile games. That lack of interest doesn’t blunt the riveting urgency of Danny Boyle’s drama in any way.

Three electric sequences unfold in real time and across multiple years, each a ticking time bomb of spinning plates: domestic troubles, corporate disputes, logistical problems, clashing personalities. A through-line of Jobs’s shifting dynamic with his daughter and her mother provides a compelling anchor to illustrate the man’s growth throughout the years. In-media-res pressure and uncomfortable confrontations give the film razor-sharp emotional bite, aided by naturalistic dialogue that flows and bristles with energy.

Every performance is strong - particularly Rogen as Wozniak - but Fassbender as Steve Jobs is mesmerizing. Through subtle expressions and a powerful performance, he portrays a character who is equally sympathetic and insufferable, a flawed condescending figure driven by uncompromising vision.

Hagazussa
★★½
Eerie, atmospheric, permeated by a sense of isolation and authentic unease, Hagazussa certainly nails the aesthetic and cinematography. Its alpine forests and bogs are uninviting environments that perfectly suit the film's dark ages folktale vibe.

Hagazussa is a movie that has been compared to The Witch. Both are period films, focused on psychological horror and superstition, with a grounded realistic sense of place. However, whereas The Witch masterfully and unambiguously sets its domestic turmoil amid occult happenings, Lukas Feigelfeld's debut feels akin to the recent horror film The Wind. An unsettling first act soon slows to a frustrating simmer of artfully unsettling imagery and occasional disturbing moments. I enjoy slow-burn horror, as well as horror that treats its occurrences as ambiguous like The Babadook. But the best examples of those always have 1) a compelling human core and 2) a sense of momentum, of narrative and thematic purpose driving the terror. Unfortunately, I felt like Hagazussa had neither, often placing imagery and quiet vignettes over those aspects.
 

More_Badass

Member
Oct 25, 2017
15,486
Best New Watches of April
- Avengers: Endgame
- Steve Jobs
- Bad Genius
- Iceman
- Tremors
- Arctic
- The Dead Zone
- The Pit & The Pendulum

Best Rewatches
- Videodrome
- Attack The Block
- The Prestige
- Alien
- The Empire Strikes Back
- Indiana Jones & The Last Crusade
 

Atraveller

Member
Oct 25, 2017
2,434
Best watches of April? In chronological order:

  1. The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring Extended Edition (2001)
  2. Alien (1979)
  3. The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers Extended Edition (2002)
  4. Aliens (1986)
  5. The Lord of the Rings: Return of the King Extended Edition (2003)
 

andrew

Member
Oct 25, 2017
960
Best of April

1) Transit
2) My Name is Julia Ross
3) Kaili Blues
4) A Day in the Country
5) The Burglar
 

hoju

Member
Oct 25, 2017
487
April:
1. Avengers Endgame
2. The Mend
3. Dragged Across Concrete
4. Witness
5. Christmas Again

I liked Christmas Again so much I bought that movies hat
 
Oct 27, 2017
1,392
Andrew did you really rank that wet fart of a movie Annihilation over High Life, the greatest sci fi flick of all time?
 

Kazura

Member
Sep 30, 2018
1,013
Best New Watches of April
- Avengers: Endgame
- Steve Jobs
- Bad Genius
- Iceman
- Tremors
- Arctic
- The Dead Zone
- The Pit & The Pendulum

Best Rewatches
- Videodrome
- Attack The Block
- The Prestige
- Alien
- The Empire Strikes Back
- Indiana Jones & The Last Crusade
I'm not trying to be a party pooper, but this is the only movie I've ever fallen asleep to in the cinema.

Nobody hates Day of the Dead.
They don't? Well my mistake then. Either way, I thought it was great, and the one that holds up the best
 
The results from the Spielberg-a-thon!

The Masterpieces
Jaws
Raiders of the Lost Ark
E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial
Empire of the Sun
Schindler's List
Munich


The Great Ones
Duel
Close Encounters of the Third Kind
Jurassic Park
Saving Private Ryan
Minority Report
Catch Me if You Can
War of the Worlds
The Adventures of Tintin


The Good Stuff
Amblin'
The Sugarland Express
Poltergeist
(I still can't resist)
Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom
Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade
Always
A.I. Artificial Intelligence
The Terminal
Lincoln
Bridge of Spies
The Post
Ready Player One


The OK Corral
Savage
The Color Purple
Hook
Amistad


The Ones You Fold Laundry To
War Horse
The BFG


Yeah, These Didn't Need to Happen
Something Evil
The Lost World: Jurassic Park
Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull
A Timeless Call
Twilight Zone: The Movie
(segment: "Kick the Can")

Career-Killing Awful for Lesser Filmmakers
1941

Envious of Anyone that Gets to See These Whenever Speilberg Shows Them Off Personally, Since All Us Normal Folk Get are Scraps
Escape to Nowhere
Firelight


In case you missed any of the reviews in the April thread, they're all collected here, along with my thoughts on the solid documentary about the man's life and career.

Otherwise, here's the rest of the stuff I watched last month!
-Okko's Inn (very good!)
-Octaman (literally unwatchable!)
-Avengers: Endgame (entertaining!)
 

swoon

Member
Oct 25, 2017
200
i was pretty surprised to read that the bfg was a bigger flop that 1941. it's also a bummer that like ishtar killed may's career and it's way better than 1941
 
i was pretty surprised to read that the bfg was a bigger flop that 1941. it's also a bummer that like ishtar killed may's career and it's way better than 1941
1941 actually did decent numbers, but it was considered more of a box office disappointment since it was coming off the back of two of the highest grossing films ever made and having a gigantic budget for the time. That it's also a terrible, terrible film is beside the point.

The BFG, on the other hand, should have helped kill Disney's desire for more book adaptations with how poorly it did worldwide, but here we are, with the corpse of A Wrinkle in Time in the rear view mirror and Artemis Fowl caught in the headlights. I guess Disney is at least somewhat masochistic.
 

CloudWolf

Member
Oct 26, 2017
5,931
April

Top 5 new watches:
1. In the Mood for Love (2000)
2. The Descent (2005)
3. The King of Comedy (1982)
4. Lore (2012)
5. Avengers: Endgame (2019)

Top rewatches:
1. Climax (2018)
2. Kids (1995)
3. Captain America: The Winter Soldier (2014)
4. Iron Man (2008)

Worst new watch:
- De Film van Dylan Haegens (2018)

Worst rewatch:
- Avengers: Age of Ultron (2015)

Most surprisingly good new watches:
- Happy Death Day 2U (2019)
- Shazam! (2019)

Seriously guys, those two are awesome.
 

andrew

Member
Oct 25, 2017
960
Andrew did you really rank that wet fart of a movie Annihilation over High Life, the greatest sci fi flick of all time?
If Annihilation is a wet fart, High Life is a burp you stifle so it comes quietly out your nose instead: I was made undeniably uncomfortable by the sensation, given the smell and the momentary reminder that I like all humans am a rapidly decaying bag of meat and am on a molecular level solely governed by the aims of eating and having sex. But I didn't feel much of anything.

I believe I've seen every end of the Denis spectrum at this point and mostly been awed: the narrative abstruseness and visual wonder of The Intruder (which I enjoyed immensely and still could not tell you a single plot point), the quotidian rhapsody of Friday Night, the simmering critique of colonialism held at the center of the foggily remembered Chocolat. Conceivably High Life should fall somewhere in this matrix for me but I could not grasp it. All I can conclude is that I have some sort of allergy to Denis doing genre work, cause I dislike Trouble Every Day too.

It's funny because I wouldn't think of myself as an ardent Annihilation fan compared to the breathless praise some heap/ed on it but I had a great time rewatching it and I think it's an excellent movie. The way it parallels the actions of cells, the built-in directives to self-destruct and individuate, to human bodies/minds intrigues me.
 
Oct 27, 2017
1,392
FWIW I’ve always suspected Annihilation would play better a second time for me as well. I’ll get around to it one day.
 
Oct 25, 2017
1,162
Age of Ultron was never any good though. :O

Last month, I watched both Hulk setup movies, and my god the 'reboot' sequel (2008) gets worse upon every viewing. Ang Lee made the only Hulk (2003) movie worth a damn.

Maybe my bias is because the entire 2008 movie is a retread of Hulk: Ultimate Destruction (Video Game, 2005-ish) that did the whole thing far better than the movie can, because video game logic and movies don't mix. Worse, the entire first hour of the movie is literally "stalking as love", which stands out like a sore spot. I get why they made it the way they did, and I can only imagine it was even worse before Norton rewrote large sections, but it does absolutely nothing, whereas the 2003 movie is an actual movie.
Kind of weird to see that last scene with Tony Stark saying "we making a team", considering how this movie is literally never brought up as a phase 1 MCU movie. It's also released like two months after Iron Man (2008)...
 

overcast

Member
Oct 25, 2017
6,106
I saw two movies in April (lmao)

1) High Life
2) Us

Transit is the movie of the year thus far.
 

andrew

Member
Oct 25, 2017
960
I saw two movies in April (lmao)

1) High Life
2) Us

Transit is the movie of the year thus far.
Transit is fantastic. also my favorite of the year so far, though I've only seen 5 2019 movies, and of the other 4 I wasn't a fan of 2 (Us, High Life) and thought the other 2 were outright bad (Avengers, Captain Marvel) so it's not much of a contest for me yet. Hoping to get to Happy Death Day 2 and High-Flying Bird soon, and John Wick 3, Non-Fiction, and The Souvenir are on the horizon.
 
Oct 27, 2017
1,392
The initial train sequence in Transit is straight up spellbinding. Like some form of hypnotization, gently easing you into the surreal.
 

Rhomega

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,591
Arizona
Top 5 of April:

1. Easy Rider
2. Shazam
3. West Side Story
4. Us
5. Firestarter

Captain Marvel: I feel this movie had more potential. It does get better in the 3rd act, and I do like how the movie is tonally different than other Marvel movies.

Avengers: Endgame: Epic conclusion to the Infinity storyline that wraps a number of things up while keep things open for more adventures. I wasn't expecting things to go the way they did.
 
Only thirteen films in April for me, quite low. A lot of that is due to watching various TV shows instead, as well as some travel.

Top 5 new viewings
1. Panic Room (2002)
2. Gloria Bell (2019)
3. Cries and Whispers (1972)
4. Avengers: Endgame (2019)
5. My Name Is Julia Ross (1945)
 

godofcookery

Avenger
Oct 25, 2017
533
Some impressions of movies I have seen lately that I posted in the arthouse thread.

The Music Room - Satyajit Ray

This film is about a time when the wealth and influence of the aristocracy and landlords of India were fading, and business owners were gaining wealth through their economic dealings. Biswambhar Roy is from a long line of land owners and spends his days slowly selling off his wife's and his own possessions to fund his self indulgent music shows.

I was at odds with myself when watching this film. Each time during the lengthy musical performances I was engrossed as Biswambhar (the main character and landlord) was, especially in his early years. As time went on the music to him became a reflection of wealth and status, and his enjoyment of it, while still total, seemed numbed by his vices. I felt a bittersweet guilt, as it seemed to be letting him indulge and love music, but as the rest of his life and his family fall apart the music became a drug. The first two of three major performances take place before a key turning point in Biswambhar's life. The first specifically shows his appreciation for the music, and shows the early days of his addiction. The second, well, happens at the turning point, and he is no longer just appreciative but entranced. The last takes place several years after, and is more engrossing yet harrowing, with a sense of finality. Also with a final and empty show of power to let his audience know that he deserves respect and spends his last monies to get it. It made me think about how I enjoy my own music and movies.

Ironically the musical performances and composer of the score were tailor made for me, so in some sense I couldn't help but be taken by it all. I will say though, I wish that Ray had more restraint when it came to the placement of the score. There were scenes with Biswambhar that could have stood fine on their own, but seemed to be filled with music for no reason that I could think of. Maybe he just appreciated the compositions, but they were strangely placed in some instances, even though I enjoyed it.

has anyone else seen this film?




Killer of Sheep - Charles Burnett

The Killer of Sheep was a much different experience than I expected going in. I got a sense of Stan's inability to show his wife the affection she so clearly wants from him, and still feels for him. She asks him why he doesn't smile anymore, like he used to, and we see him later smiling at his daughter. This movie happily eschews a narrative flow, and happily the movie is much more interested in just showing Stan's relation to the outer world. The dancing scene is romantic and sorrowful all at once, his wife holds him and feels his skin like a lover would, but he circles blankly, his hands lazily draped over her hips and to my eyes, unable to connect.

It feels like Stan cauterized himself to his job and in turn parts of his life. Temptation of crime and easier money that the liquor store owner who covets his body are not considered, but neither are the advances of his wife. Stan's view of his value is the work he does, and small bits of opportunity that cashing a check brings. Even so it's a limbo, Stan spends money on this motor, but a bit of carelessness leaves it broken and now, because he doesn't have any 'spare' money left it has to be abandoned.

Similarly later in the film a flat tire prevents them from going to the races where his friend is self assured that his horse will win, but the reality of their situation prevents them from having or getting a spare. I remember a few years ago I helped a man change his tire in Philly. He had been wrestling with his own jack for a while, and i had a unused one in my car, so i stopped and helped him put on his spare. I thought about his future, about having to ride around on a spare tire when he had no money that week for a new tire. The police would surely stop him, and it would cost him more money that he didn't have.

His choice of accompanying music is great, and like The Music Room shows a real love of these songs, and they add interesting textures to these scenes.

I honestly don't think I am completely equipped to watch this movie and understand everything I was shown, but I am glad I did, and will be revisiting it in the future.
 
The Go-Go Boys: The Inside Story of Cannon Films: In perhaps the biggest surprise that I can think of for dueling films, the documentary about Cannon Films that involved both Menahem Golan and Yoram Globus was the one that wound up more reserved and focused on the business side of their relationship. In truth, this actually makes for a great companion piece to Electric Boogaloo: The Wild, Untold Story of Cannon Films, as that one does a better job of showing the full scope of their output than this one does and the flashy trashiness of the approach they took with that film contrasts rather nicely. Here, we get the story straight from the men themselves as they go over their early careers in Israel to breaking through in Hollywood, and beyond when they went their separate ways. Golan and Globus are certainly passionate about the business itself, not really apologizing for the kinds of movies that they specialized in while finding different avenues to rise above the criticism of their output with some rather notable forays into the world of prestige filmmaking. If the other documentary is a raucously entertaining good time, the quieter and rather sweet perspective here of a couple of men that nearly ruled all of Hollywood makes for a good exploration into the hopes and dreams of those who try their best to live within their means, and the approach being so different here with the presence of both men means that there's surprisingly less shared ground than one may have expected, increasing the value of this considerably. And if for nothing else, the bit where Jean-Claude Van Damme gets to relate the story of how Golan gave him his big break is absolutely priceless and worth the price of admission all by itself.
 

overcast

Member
Oct 25, 2017
6,106
I don’t know why I keep thinking these movies will be more, but Endgame definitely falls short of some of the praise I’ve heard. I might write some spoiler thoughts later but apart from a couple of moments it kinda comes and goes.

I’ll give it props for being pretty brisk for a 3 hour movie all things considered.
 

Borgnine

Member
Oct 25, 2017
878
I saw War Horse in the theater and the hard drive crashed with about 20 minutes left. No one cared.
 
OP
OP
Divius

Divius

Member
Oct 25, 2017
629
The Netherlands
nvm

edit: to give this post at least some content:

I watched Cronenberg's CRASH yesterday, which was weirdly erotic. Interesting characters, very depressing.
 

Rhomega

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,591
Arizona
Austin Powers: International Man of Mystery: I remember the first time I heard of Austin Powers, which was when we saw Star Wars: Episode I in theaters, and one of the trailers was for The Spy Who Shagged Me. It's actually the only trailer I remember. Now that the trilogy is back on Netflix, I thought I'd check it out and...I don't care much for the first movie. So now we have a man who is a nymphomaniac first and a secret agent second. Really, the most interesting thing about him is catching up on the things he's missed out on. Now Dr. Evil is a more interesting character, being a cool parody of Blofeld, as well as Scott, just a teen caught up in his father's evil plans. It's not all that funny or interesting. I'm surprised it's a wide-release movie and not some James Bond porn parody.

Considering that the ratings on the sequels get worse and worse, I'll skip the rest of them.
 

TheBeardedOne

Banned
Oct 27, 2017
22,189
Derry
I recorded Cool Hand Luke, and watched it this morning when I couldn't sleep. It was great. One of the better movies I've seen in a long time.

I didn't realize that the quote from the start of Guns 'N Roses' best song (Civil War) is from that movie.
 
Kaiju Bunraku: Well, the title says it all! We're sadly limited to just one on-screen kaiju, but I do have to admire the commitment from the performers to treat this like a real bunraku performance, letting the jokes dictate the humor and not the oddness of making one of these as a tribute to both art forms. I wasn't a particularly huge fan of the way it was shot at times, but I suppose that they wanted to capture the look and feel as if this was being performed on-stage with cameramen on hand, so there's at least a justification for why. It all builds to the reveal of who is attacking our beleaguered couple today, which is an impressive practical creation and clearly had as much love put into as it did lots of work to make sure that Toho couldn't sue. Simplistic, but fun for folks with an appreciation for either kaiju or bunraku.
 
The Vampire: Hey, wait a minute, this isn't about a sea animal at all! It's been a while since I last saw a Painlevé short, so this departure was right up my alley. Funny enough, it does start with a sea animal-heavy montage to help lay down the central point of how animal life inspires real life elements, be they tradition or outright fiction, with the build-up reaching its climax when footage from Nosferatu plays as the lead-in into our title critter of the evening. We get a nice summary of its primary behaviors, though in an amusing twist, the more the short zooms in on the famously hideous mug, the more it becomes endearing with just how wonderfully odd it looks with its pronounced harelip needing to vibrate so much. It's a fascinating creature to watch in action with its propensity to crawl around on all fours instead of what folks would normally assume would be an otherwise airborne creature, which Painlevé is able to capture in his understated yet artistic manner as I've so often seen from him. Word of warning to folks out there: while nothing really bad happens to it, there is a literal Guinea pig that the bat drinks from in order to show how it feeds from an animal, so if anyone has a thing for cute things in duress, this may not be your thing!
 

JetSetSoul

Member
Oct 28, 2017
804
April - Old & New

Hail Satan? - good perspective on satanism, politics
Goodfellas - better than The Godfather
The Wind - good Western bone chiller
Penguins - daughter's first film in theater
High Life - with end of year potential

This month is SIFF - I'm overloaded with new quality films.
 

JaeCryo

Member
Nov 6, 2017
3,626
Burning

Knew nothing about it going in and was surprised to see the Murakami connection. It definitely lived up to that promise. Feels like the closest thing you could get to translating Murakami to film in a relatively reserved and focused way.
 

TheBeardedOne

Banned
Oct 27, 2017
22,189
Derry
April - Old & New

Hail Satan? - good perspective on satanism, politics
Goodfellas - better than The Godfather
The Wind - good Western bone chiller
Penguins - daughter's first film in theater
High Life - with end of year potential

This month is SIFF - I'm overloaded with new quality films.
Goodfellas is the GOAT mob movie. It's better than The Godfather and Casino. Way better than Casino.
 

Window

Member
Oct 27, 2017
4,420
Across the Universe: This thing is so darn visually inventive and arresting. It helps that it's all happening to the sounds of The Beatles. The characters are maybe not strongly defined or well explored but the film very cleverly manages to tell a simple but coherent story through its string of musical sequences, re-interpreting the meaning of some classic songs along the way. Kind of surprised to see the negative critical reception this received. Maybe it's just an overlong music video and yes it's a bit too literal in matching visual imagery with the lyrics but I found even that but particularly its visual choreography to be engaging for the entire run time. I didn't know of Julie Taymor before this film but I'll check out her other films (which appear to be mostly Shakespeare adaptions) now.