Movies You've Seen Recently | May 2019

Oct 27, 2017
1,235
First Reformed by far.

Long Shot - Got some laughs out of me so that's already hitting baseline levels of enjoyment. Some jokes were absolute clunkers though, and I did not buy the Seth Rogen-Charlize Theron romance for a second. Seth was just way too obnoxious in this one, more so than his past roles. Doesn't do a lot with the political angle either. Paint-by-numbers rom-com that's overlong at 2 hours. 3/5
 

Rhomega

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,591
Arizona
Spectre: Between this and Die Another Day, why is so hard to get the James Bond opener right? At least the opening scene is a long take. After hearing it a few times, The Writing's On The Wall isn't a terrible Bond theme, but I'm not a fan of Sam Smith's singing. The movie can be visually nice in places, like the streets of Rome and snowy mountains of Austria.

But here's the real problem: it's not interesting. The plot is not interesting. Blofeld is not interesting, and the half-brother hook feels like "Well, we got nothing better to do with him." He was done better in You Only Live Twice. Bond going rogue was better in Licence to Kill. The nigh-invincible, silent strongman was done better with Oddjob and Jaws. There are simply better Bond movies out there.

I have now seen every official James Bond movie to date.
 

More_Badass

Member
Oct 25, 2017
15,486
This rewatch, I surprisingly appreciated Two Towers more and felt Return of the King was weaker in certain areas.

The first hour or so of The Two Towers feels a tad overstuffed as it picks up the story threads of Fellowship, presents a broader narrative scope, and introduces a host of new characters. However, that set-up is essential for establishing the growing threat of Mordor, but more importantly, it's needed to imbue the struggles and relationships of the protagonists with dramatic heft. The Two Towers is a notably darker and more brutal movie than Fellowship, the quintessential fantasy adventure of the first movie replaced with death, despair, and war. But rather than following the Empire Strikes Back formula, The Two Towers contrasts its sense of doom with hope and triumph.

(And the clarity, intimate moments, and ominous spectacle of Helm’s Deep is even more impressive after seeing Game of Thrones’ massive battle recently)

===

At times, Return of the King is a welcome return to the intimate horror-tinged adventures of Fellowship, particularly in regards to Shelob and Mordor itself. The harrowing journey of Frodo and Sam remains the trilogy’s highlight due to their powerful friendship and ceaseless hardships, but the other plot threads lack the sharp focus of the previous films. Additionally, the loss of Saruman’s commanding presence and role as a central antagonist is deeply felt in comparison to this movie’s menacing yet ultimately shallow villains like the Witch-King.

But even more crucially, the battles here, gargantuan and epic as they are, just don’t measure up to the intensity and compelling character beats of Helm’s Deep, or even the forest skirmish in Fellowship. The nature of Minas Tirith being a last bastion against evil is less potent than it was with Rohan and the fateful clash in Two Towers. The siege and battle of Pelennor Fields cross-cuts between Rohan’s forces, the Path of the Dead, Shelob, Faramir, a calm talk between Gandalf and Pippin; I wouldn’t call the movie disjointed but that central sequence doesn’t quite maintain its momentum. The arrival of Aragon and his allies feels far less triumphant and earned compared to Gandalf’s similar entrance in the second movie. Return of the King’s spectacle is impressively epic and viscerally entertaining, but doesn’t exude the apocalyptic doom or operatic emotion that defined The Two Towers.

However, I wouldn’t consider any of those aspects as flaws per se, just things that stood out in the wake of rewatching the other two movies. The battles are thrilling, the characters engaging, the world as engrossing as ever. The final act and epilogue of Return of the King are immensely satisfying cinema, a feat of grand pay-off for many hours of war, camaraderie, and adventure.
 

True Savior

Member
Oct 27, 2017
2,882
wasteland
Endgame is a pile of shit that seemed to never end. A slog of a narrative based on repetition of prior events, an absurd amount of saccharine that has no right to exist and everything culminates in a cgi cringefest final battle. Point me to a well composed scene in this film. You can't.
Snap this film from existence.
 

Segafreak

Member
Oct 27, 2017
1,730
Star Wars The Last Jedi

Not only the worst Star Wars but one of the worst movies I've ever seen.
 

Flow

Community Resettler
The Fallen
Oct 25, 2017
3,381
Florida, USA
Endgame is a pile of shit that seemed to never end. A slog of a narrative based on repetition of prior events, an absurd amount of saccharine that has no right to exist and everything culminates in a cgi cringefest final battle. Point me to a well composed scene in this film. You can't.
Snap this film from existence.
Is this Thanos burner account?
 

Mekanos

Banned
Oct 17, 2018
3,836
I saw Us last week and overall I liked it but I couldn't get past how little sense the "rules" of the setting made. Kinda feels like a first draft. Get Out went through over 20 revisions and it shows; that script is airtight.

Lupita was of course fantastic... although that one scene where

she's sneaking up on Original Lupita, who keeps dumping exposition, while we keep cutting back to her sneaking up, to show she's made no progress, over like five minutes, was comical.

The symbolism and themes were cool but I think the story was on the iffy side.
 

andrew

Member
Oct 25, 2017
960
Alright darlings. Which is better: Silence or First Reformed?

(Have yet to watch the latter, in personal terms. Reserve my vote.)
Silence by a hair. Both stupendous, and First Reformed has the better performance(s), but Silence is Scorsese in wizened master mode
Endgame is a pile of shit that seemed to never end. A slog of a narrative based on repetition of prior events, an absurd amount of saccharine that has no right to exist and everything culminates in a cgi cringefest final battle. Point me to a well composed scene in this film. You can't.
Snap this film from existence.
same tbh. It’s just so goddamn boring.
 

TissueBox

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,955
Urinated States of America
I far prefer First Reformed. I like Silence but I don't think of it as one of Scorsese's best as some do. Silence is only ever interesting to me 1.In the conversations scenes involving Ogata/Neeson for its dicussion of imperialism and the culutural lens through which we interpret meaning 2.In how it treats the character of Kichijiro on sin and forgiveness. But these scenes are brief and not perfect. It kinda lost me on the discussion of faith. First Reformed's concerns are may be not as interesting but feel a lot more immediate and relevant to today but that's just the top layer of the story. Beneath is the age old Paul Schrader character from Taxi Driver. However Schrader does some interesting things with this premise using elements from the the genre he calls the Transcendental Style. And that ending is amazing. Silence is the more visually pleasing film though.
Kichijiro is a potently conveyed mold of man. An element that holds the film's heart with probably the most resonant reflection on, simply, the most unplaceable, bottom of the barrel belligerence -- human folly; our will to inconsistency, amok recidivism. The inability to even trust the supposed trust you have in your self. For an archetype to lend such power without falling into tedium or the service of a single dimension is helped in no small manner by the strong character play throughout, great shot framing and invisible track absence in tow. Scorsese and co. deliberate here -- it grows more and more suffocating as the acts pass by and you barely take notice.

Characters and characteristics like those definitely point to Silence being, at least in raw evocation, a Scorsese title of lingering gravity. Though it is not without its padded up, briskly skimmed, early run-on sentence paced unevenness. In terms of pure craftsmanship, I'd slip it under Hugo, The Departed, The Aviator, and The Wolf of Wall Street this turn of the century.

But thanks to its meditations, Kichijiro et al are prone to powerful whispers. How they dwell. After all,

"Where is the place for a weak man in a world like this?"

(EDIT: Of course, this makes seeing old partner in crime Paul Schrader in grade-A form all the more enticing. Jus' like the golden days Rudy.)
 
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Genocide:
Hey guys, what's going on in this here "when insects attack" film that we haven't seen be-

::the twist happens::

WHAT WHAT WHAT

There's definitely some crudeness in the production qualities and one very unfortunate use of black stereotyping going on to sift through, but I'll be damned if I've seen one of these with a more original plot, and seldom as bleak as this one gets. This is the kind of transgressive work of inspired insanity the world needs more of.
 

Fuhgeddit

Member
Oct 27, 2017
2,414
I have not watched anything either but I have received Green book so I want to watch that this weekend.
 

Addi

Member
Oct 25, 2017
769
Just saw The Mirror by Tarkovsky. Incredible.

As an aspiring filmmaker myself, it's immensly inspiring to see, but also completely demotivating. Why bother, right?
 
Dinosaur 13: An engrossing true-life story of perhaps the most bittersweet taste possible for a situation that doesn't involve the loss of human life. The doc does a terrific job of showing the pride and heartbreak of Sue's discoverers as the situation surrounding the find deteriorates into one of the most baffling court battles that could have ensued from an archeological find, all along the way finding all kinds of twists and turns that a writer for a fictional work would throw out for being too unbelievable.
 

Einchy

Member
Oct 25, 2017
22,655
On the Beach at Night Alone

The first part was really boring while the last two were much more interesting but it never really picked up and none of the conversations, which is the whole movie, really felt all that engrossing.

Braveheart

It's one of those must see films that I had never gotten around to watching since it's 3 hours long but I finally got around to it, it definitely lived up to the hype.
 

TissueBox

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,955
Urinated States of America
Just saw The Mirror by Tarkovsky. Incredible.

As an aspiring filmmaker myself, it's immensly inspiring to see, but also completely demotivating. Why bother, right?
A cinematic pinnacle. Tarkovsky's spiritual, impressionistic opus.

I really liked Adaptation
Adaptation and Eternal Sunshine will always be part treasure. Both are as invigorating as they are somewhat overtly affected, but they are as solid a translation of such concepts than one can get. Classic Charlie.
 
Anaconda (rewatch): A briskly paced monster movie with some surprisingly progressive sensibilities to it (hey, lets have the heroes be the two minorities of the boat crew!) to go with the meat and potatoes approach to the plotting and the rather nice on-location shooting (Bill Butler was certainly an inspired choice). It is also a really stupid movie from a writing perspective in terms of characterizations, motivations and a really bizarre element in which the finale features a different snake altogether, and as fun as the GIFs the film has produced for the more choice moments of his performance, Jon Voight definitely crosses that precious line of overacting right into outright embarrassment, making you long for the death that his character eventually gets much sooner. It's very much a mixed bag, but it does have an appreciable level of endearment for how straightforward its aims are at all times: you wanted a giant killer snake movie, you get one here.
 

FaceHugger

Member
Oct 27, 2017
6,302
Pacific Rim: Uprising
Strange that they basically took this in a completely different direction tonally, thematically, and artistically. I understand the appeal of chasing the Marvel brand of action-filled levity alongside the young adult market in an attempt to create a tentpole that prints money for years, but this property doesn't feel like a suitable vehicle for all that.

I do prefer the more fluid, dynamic Jaegers in this. While the old Jaegers had a certain charm with their slow and deliberate nature, this new style lent itself to more interesting action in contrast to the stiff behemoths from the first.

The world they exist in is now jarringly advanced. It doesn't feel like enough time has passed for all of this advancement to have occurred - they transitioned from a post apocalyptic civilization that's just barely holding out, to a flourishing technological utopia.

Boyega couldn't carry the humor. They wrote his part to rattle off jokes and quips a mile a minute. They should have just cast a comedian. When the supporting cast from the first film begins showing up it feels weird - they're now almost entirely comedic relief in a film already packed with levity, and they barely resemble themselves as we know them from the first film.

Plotwise it feels empty. They attempt to tug at heartstrings and impress urgency upon certain moments but it all feels as predictable as a young adult movie from the early 2000's, when the audience comes in understanding that the stakes are pretty low.

Long story short, I didn't like it.
 
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Come and See (1985): Reputed as one of the most brutal war films ever made, I frankly found it to be a grinding slog, and not in the good way. It is indeed grim as hell, but it neglects to give you any real reason to care about what's happening onscreen.

Boyz n the Hood (1991): R.I.P. John Singleton, who, for one reason or another, never quite became the celebrated auteur that his breakout success suggested he might be. But there's quite a cast assembled here. I find it interesting to see what is clearly aiming to be a gritty realist sort of film nevertheless have such a bright colour palette (thanks, early 1990s fashions!), something I doubt the equivalent made today would have.

Pokemon: Detective Pikachu (2019): Cute, if inconsequential.

Pride & Prejudice (2005): The local independent cinema was screening this the last few days, so I went with my mother. She saw it in theatres with me and my father in 2005, I'm not sure if she'd seen it since; I own it on Blu-ray, but the opportunity to see the gorgeous cinematography again on the big screen was irresistible. This also surely has one of the best casts in recent memory, particularly in terms of how much young talent was present and not yet established; pretty much all of the young female cast went on to have at least semi-notable careers, with three of the five Bennett sisters being Oscar-nominated thus far.

The Fallen Idol (1948): One of Carol Reed's early films, immediately preceding the classic The Third Man, which was also made in collaboration with Graham Greene. This has a great premise, but almost every narrative decision undercuts the premise -- in particular, the audience is told right off the bat what really happens, so what could have been a really great mystery/suspense story told from a limited perspective loses that.
 

Blader

Member
Oct 27, 2017
8,552
The Magnificent Ambersons
There are kernels of an interesting story here that is just totally ruined by the editing. The film often feels rushed, especially in the second half, jumping from scene to scene without strong throughlines or glossing over fairly important plot or character turns in just seconds. Here and there you can get a glimpse of a good film buried underneath a lot of frankly baffling editing decisions (on more than one occasion the film fades out on a character mid-dialogue! they don't even finish speaking!); Welles' narration about George getting his comeuppance and no one being around to remember or care is a particular highlight. But a lot of character work feels muddled and the story of an old-money family being passed by the times feels like more of a backdrop than it should've been. The ending lives up to its infamous reputation and while it's not fair to hold that against Welles since he had no control of it, it still exists and is so utterly lame that I'm kind of amazed this movie has fans at all. I wasn't even that into it -- tbh I found the film pretty cold and distant for most of its length - and I even thought the ending totally ruined everything the story seemingly about and building toward. Maybe one day all the excised footage will show up in somebody's closet and a better recut will emerge.
5/10

The Red Balloon
A really charming, elegantly told story about a kid and his balloon. The cinematography is gorgeous; what a treat to have 50s Paris preserved in color like this. How the hell did they get the balloons to act like that?!
8/10

La Jetee
Like The Red Balloon, another French short whose brevity and relative simplicity makes it so impressive. To tell a story like this so easily from just a collection of still shots (whose composition and selection is as impressive as anything else here) and editing, with no dialogue and the barest amounts of narration, is a strong testament to what the kids like to call "pure cinema."
7/10
 
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Einchy

Member
Oct 25, 2017
22,655
Ain't Them Bodies Saints:

This one reminded me a lot of The Old Man & the Gun, which turned out to be the case because it was written and directed by the same person. Very well edited and directed and great performances by Casey Affleck, Rooney Mara, Ben Foster and Keith Carradine. I enjoyed it quite a bit.

Paddington:

Loved it.
This is the type of film that's impossible not to smile all the way through. Such a wonderfully happy film that will melt anyone's heart. Lots of laughs and lots of feels. Loved it.

It has been ages since I saw this! I was thinking of it recently and was wondering if it aged well. You’re saying it is still holding up?
Funny enough, the only thing that's dated about it is the very first second where you see a 90s as fuck title card but the rest is great.
 

Switch Back 9

Avenger
Oct 27, 2017
2,416
If you film dorks hate comic book movies so much why do you bother watching them?

Wouldn't your time be better spent watching some experimental 5 hour German art house film shot entirely in someone's fridge?
 

swoon

Member
Oct 25, 2017
200
Come and See (1985): Reputed as one of the most brutal war films ever made, I frankly found it to be a grinding slog, and not in the good way. It is indeed grim as hell, but it neglects to give you any real reason to care about what's happening onscreen.
glad to see someone else share my opinion about this film
 

TissueBox

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,955
Urinated States of America
If you film dorks hate comic book movies so much why do you bother watching them?

Wouldn't your time be better spent watching some experimental 5 hour German art house film shot entirely in someone's fridge?
Plenty of film dorks even on here enjoy stuff like the MCU. Art house films have plenty of heavy handed stinkers and most, in fact, suck -- aka film school graduate project syndrome.

Everything's a matter of taste. Not everybody likes Citizen Kane. If you love the medium and have reasoning, then you will want to keep up with it, and it is an ongoing conversation of which you are a pivotal part.
 

andrew

Member
Oct 25, 2017
960
If you film dorks hate comic book movies so much why do you bother watching them?

Wouldn't your time be better spent watching some experimental 5 hour German art house film shot entirely in someone's fridge?
Hey dude why do you feel so butthurt and threatened over some people not liking a movie made by a massive conglomerate that has been widely embraced by the general public and will make billions of dollars. What’s at stake for you here exactly
 

Switch Back 9

Avenger
Oct 27, 2017
2,416
Hey dude why do you feel so butthurt and threatened over some people not liking a movie made by a massive conglomerate that has been widely embraced by the general public and will make billions of dollars. What’s at stake for you here exactly
I'm not the one acting butthurt or.. Threatened? Really? Look at your post!

I'm just curious, I see a lot of vitriol directed towards MCU films in here and I'm curious why you guys even waste your time when it's clear you already know you're not going to like it. I get it, you don't like these films. Why bother watching them?

Relax dude.
 
Oct 27, 2017
1,392
There are kernels of an interesting here that is just totally ruined in the ending. The film often feels rushed, especially in the second half, jumping from scene to scene without strong throughlines or glossing over fairly important plot or character turns in just seconds. Here and there you can get a glimpse of a good film buried underneath a lot of frankly baffling editing decisions (on more than one occasion the film fades out on a character mid-dialogue! they don't even finish speaking!); Welles' narration about George getting his comeuppance and no one being around to remember or care is a particular highlight. But a lot of character work feels muddled and the story of an old-money family being passed by the times feels like more of a backdrop than it should've been. The ending lives up to its infamous reputation and while it's not fair to hold that against Welles since he had no control of it, it still exists and is so utterly lame that I'm kind of amazed this movie has fans at all. I wasn't even that into it -- tbh I found the film pretty cold and distant for most of its length - and I even thought the ending totally ruined everything the story seemingly about and building toward. Maybe one day all the excised footage will show up in somebody's closet and a better recut will emerge.
5/10
Honestly none of the editing bothered me at all, the movie gets by on the hilarious two-man game between Georgie and Fanny. Proto Arrested Development.
 
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Bathtubs Over Broadway: I am not sure what's more amazing: that there was a huge world of musical theater productions made specifically for business corporations of all shapes and sizes; that the material contained in a few of these are actually really fun numbers that wouldn't be too hard to disassociate from things like toilets or Walmart; or that the journey that former Letterman writer Steve Young takes winds up being a genuinely affecting one as his efforts to catalog this strange, unseen world of entertainment winds up with a ripple effect that touches the lives of its writers and performers in a way that is absent of irony and smugness, giving these industrial show tunes a resonance that no one could have ever imagined possible with this second life that they've been granted as a result of his efforts to bring them out of the shadows and into just a little speck of limelight. There is such a great enthusiasm and exuberance running throughout this documentary that even you might feel inspired to break out into song and dance over your chosen profession.
 

swoon

Member
Oct 25, 2017
200
I need to know something

is this movie racist? is it pro-imperalist or anti-imperalist? before I watch it

the movie isn't any more racist than than all the ww2 movies with faceless enemies, the way people champion the actual battle can be pretty racist, but the movie i think is trying to not glory that notion. the success of that may be up for debate.
 

ViewtifulJC

Member
Oct 25, 2017
11,509
The Worlds End - Bigger budget gloss of Shaun of the Dead, when ya get right down to it. Not quite as funny or exciting as that one, but thematically richer in its exploration of friendship, nostalgia, and alcoholism. Pegg and Frost give their career best performances here, and the cast is rounded out by a bunch of excellent British actors. Some key collaborators from Scott Pilgrim tag along, from editing and cinematography and music, so the level of filmmaking remains high. I think one of the most crucial crew members is Jared Allen, former Jackie Chan stunt team director. He stages several great set pieces that have that same Jackie Chan energy; underdogs chaotically fighting to escape with props flying around.

Wright doesn’t do anything by accident. His films are not spontaneous or naturalistic. Every scene, damn near every line is setting up a later joke or plot reveal. Even the names Peter and Paul is used for a joke. Hell, even the names of the bars our protagonists visit coordinate with an plot event(The Two Headed Dog where they fight the twins, or The Hole in the Wall where a car is driven through a wall). He definitely writes himself into a corner with the finale, and there’s a crazy ending I’m still not sure what to think.

Doesn’t really matter though. The main appeal of Wright’s films is for the nerdy observant cinephile who sees all the dominos he setting up, and the joy of seeing them fall down. If it leaves a mess on the floor where his films just kinda stop instead of ending, so be it. To err is human, and we’re just here to have a good time.
 

Borgnine

Member
Oct 25, 2017
878
glad to see someone else share my opinion about this film
I watched it twice just to make sure it wasn't me cause this movie is super lame. If I remember it's like 2+ hours of meandering followed by 10 minutes of cartoonish violence. No idea why this is held up as "one of the saddest movies ever" or some shit.

I'm just curious, I see a lot of vitriol directed towards MCU films in here and I'm curious why you guys even waste your time when it's clear you already know you're not going to like it. I get it, you don't like these films. Why bother watching them?
Check my Letterboxd for receipts, I stopped watching around Ultron. Which means I have the Bona Fides to tell you these movies suck dick.
 

Yams

Member
Oct 25, 2017
4,976
I'm not the one acting butthurt or.. Threatened? Really? Look at your post!

I'm just curious, I see a lot of vitriol directed towards MCU films in here and I'm curious why you guys even waste your time when it's clear you already know you're not going to like it. I get it, you don't like these films. Why bother watching them?

Relax dude.
Some of us have children and you have to bite the bullet
 

Window

Member
Oct 27, 2017
4,420
When watching Come and See I also first thought the violence was over the top and cartoonish but then I thought is that simply because I can't fathom anyone committing such horrible acts so non-chalantly? Is my sense of disbelief kicking in a humour response? Did people really treat human lives so carelessly? After that I just didn't know what to make of what I was watching except the thought of it happening for real is distressing.
 

Borgnine

Member
Oct 25, 2017
878
I mean the stacked bodies shot is fantastic and is going to be with me for the rest of my life. But other than that.
 

Boownage

Member
Oct 31, 2017
1,170
The Netherlands
Just saw John Wick Chapter 3.

This whole series of movies has been amazing and they keep delivering, absolutely loved this one, it's just as good as the previous movies but even more crazy and beautiful.