Movies You've Seen Recently | May 2019

In a Lonely Place: A truly excellent merger of film noir and romantic melodrama. The psychological depth this displays is so typical of Nicholas Ray's work, and yet it still blows my mind to see such care put into the characters here with how easily this could have diverted into tropes, further enhanced by the great performances from both Bogie and Gloria Grahame turn in for their characters and a really well-rounded supporting cast. It's also a credit to how well written the picture is that you can guess at pretty much every major plot element well in advance and still be on pins and needles throughout since you can't really be too sure as to how it will ultimately resolve with how well maintained the tension is throughout and having just enough uncertainty to satisfy the thriller aspects without overwhelming the heart of the film. Absolutely superb in every facet, and now I can safely say that 1950 produced one hell of a trifecta of noir-tinged showbiz films with this joining such exalted company as Sunset Boulevard and All About Eve.
 

sackboy97

Member
Oct 26, 2017
1,381
Italy
What did you guys think of Guadagnino's Suspiria? I'm a bit conflicted on it. Among other things, I'm not sure what was the point of the political backdrop/subplot.
 
Oct 27, 2017
1,392
What did you guys think of Guadagnino's Suspiria? I'm a bit conflicted on it. Among other things, I'm not sure what was the point of the political backdrop/subplot.
Basically the screenwriter thought the original was dumb, so he added all the political stuff to make it (in his mind) more interesting. I like the movie, but the pacing drags a little, especially considering how lean the original is. I dig how the dance elements are way more fleshed out.
 
Last edited:

swoon

Member
Oct 25, 2017
200
adding the political stuff/cultural understanding of guilt to the film i think does make it way more interesting, especially considering the other option would be to expand the witch stuff which is already the weakest part of the films
 
adding the political stuff/cultural understanding of guilt to the film i think does make it way more interesting, especially considering the other option would be to expand the witch stuff which is already the weakest part of the films
Also, from a very basic level of horror, it also adds in a real sense of doom to the world in that no wake of life is safe. If not the witches in the school, it's the terrorist attacks on the outside, and very few have any input on the when and where of it all, which is what helps to power Suzy's character arc in the remake.
 

TissueBox

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,955
Urinated States of America
The Worlds End - Bigger budget gloss of Shaun of the Dead, when ya get right down to it. Not quite as funny or exciting as that one, but thematically richer in its exploration of friendship, nostalgia, and alcoholism. Pegg and Frost give their career best performances here, and the cast is rounded out by a bunch of excellent British actors. Some key collaborators from Scott Pilgrim tag along, from editing and cinematography and music, so the level of filmmaking remains high. I think one of the most crucial crew members is Jared Allen, former Jackie Chan stunt team director. He stages several great set pieces that have that same Jackie Chan energy; underdogs chaotically fighting to escape with props flying around.

Wright doesn’t do anything by accident. His films are not spontaneous or naturalistic. Every scene, damn near every line is setting up a later joke or plot reveal. Even the names Peter and Paul is used for a joke. Hell, even the names of the bars our protagonists visit coordinate with an plot event(The Two Headed Dog where they fight the twins, or The Hole in the Wall where a car is driven through a wall). He definitely writes himself into a corner with the finale, and there’s a crazy ending I’m still not sure what to think.
Oho Wright especially cranked it to eleven here. The opening flashback sequence

is the entire movie boiled down to a few minutes

and it's a blast. The whole movie is, on several bases: humor, flourish, and a surprising pinch of heart pulling at a grand scale. Stubbornly so.
 
Last edited:

Fancy Clown

Member
Oct 25, 2017
2,533
If you film dorks hate comic book movies so much why do you bother watching them?

Wouldn't your time be better spent watching some experimental 5 hour German art house film shot entirely in someone's fridge?
I'm not the one acting butthurt
🤔


I watched it twice just to make sure it wasn't me cause this movie is super lame. If I remember it's like 2+ hours of meandering followed by 10 minutes of cartoonish violence. No idea why this is held up as "one of the saddest movies ever" or some shit.
I was on board with it when the Nazi’s were just a vague, nightmarish presence where their only physicality is the bodies they leave behind, the bullets they shoot, and the creepy omniscient spy plane that flys overhead. The kid wandering through this indeterminate hellscape where nothing quite makes sense or feels real was compelling to me.

But then we get the uber cartoon nazis at the end goin whole hog and it just loses its oomph.
 
Last edited:

Switch Back 9

Avenger
Oct 27, 2017
2,416
Plenty of film dorks even on here enjoy stuff like the MCU. Art house films have plenty of heavy handed stinkers and most, in fact, suck -- aka film school graduate project syndrome.

Everything's a matter of taste. Not everybody likes Citizen Kane. If you love the medium and have reasoning, then you will want to keep up with it, and it is an ongoing conversation of which you are a pivotal part.
This is a nice and reasonable answer.
 

Fancy Clown

Member
Oct 25, 2017
2,533
Were you really looking for a nice and reasonable answer with how you phrased any part of your question? Talk shit, get shit.
 

Flow

Community Resettler
The Fallen
Oct 25, 2017
3,381
Florida, USA
Top 5 new watches
1. Burning Cane
2. Shadow
3. Fast Color
4. Avengers: Endgame
5. House of Hummingbird
 
OP
OP
Divius

Divius

Member
Oct 25, 2017
629
The Netherlands
Don't feed the trolls :c

--

also I haven't been watching a lot of movies

also my 31 days of horror master list currently contains 183 films, i might go insane
 

True Savior

Member
Oct 27, 2017
2,882
wasteland
I actually had to see burning again because of a date 🥵


Thats what it really felt like. Old people tackling youth issues. Lets contain memekami in books btw.
 

Classicrock78

Member
Oct 27, 2017
3,163
3o’clock high cool fun movie student gets bullied by new transfer,and is forced to fight him after school while trying to think of ways to get out of it.
 

Blader

Member
Oct 27, 2017
8,552
What did you guys think of Guadagnino's Suspiria? I'm a bit conflicted on it. Among other things, I'm not sure what was the point of the political backdrop/subplot.
It was one of my most anticipated movies last year and I was very disappointed with the end result. Largely, I think, because of how disastrously bad the climax is (and I'm not sure what to make of the epilogue either). At least I got a new Thom Yorke album out of it.
 

True Savior

Member
Oct 27, 2017
2,882
wasteland
The film perspective is the impotent young man who grows jealous of an older successful one. It revolves around the misery of a new youth and the fight of classes. Only Chang Dong is too old to tell this story without falling in shitty cliches about young people.
And yes mememaki is the author.
 

VAD

Member
Oct 28, 2017
1,145
Just saw The Dead Don’t Die. I think that was the most action packed movie of his. Adam Driver, Bill Murray and Tilda Swinton are killing it. I love this Cannes festival already (well except Thierry Fremeaux that once again pulls down his pants regarding Alain Delon this time)
 

Einchy

Member
Oct 25, 2017
22,655
Paddington 2.

It’s like the first but twice the heartwarming. These movies are a cure for feeling shitty.

Pokémon Detective Pikachu.

Decent movie, pretty funny and has a lot of heart.
 
Paddington 2.

It’s like the first but twice the heartwarming. These movies are a cure for feeling shitty.
The first film I think is a pretty solid family movie that nevertheless treads on some pretty formulaic ground in places; Paddington 2 is a stone cold classic.

Flashdance (1983): A number of amazing music videos (one of which seems designed to trigger epileptic fits in the audience) intercut with some decent depictions of blue collar striving and a tepid love story (Wiki lists a slew of future/rising stars who auditioned to be the male lead, and it's hard not to think that any number of them would have been better than Michael Nouri, the eventual choice). Jennifer Beals is very charming as the lead -- it's hard not to wonder whether she'd have become a bigger star had she struck while the iron was hot instead of finishing Yale, though obviously she went on to have a pretty decent career (certainly the best of anybody in this film; other than Beals there aren't any retroactively memorable faces here, which feels unusual for a really successful 1980s film). This made me wish that original film soundtrack hits were still more of a thing, because damnit, they were a lot of fun, and when they are done well, the cinematic moments they create are indelible. It's weird to see a movie about an exotic dancer that treats dancing topless in a strip club as a sign of a character's despondency.
 

More_Badass

Member
Oct 25, 2017
15,486
What the hell happened discussion-wise last page?

Shallow Grave
★★★★

Danny Boyle’s debut is an impressive blend of pitch-black comedy and sociopathic vice, complete with the visual flourishes and slick script that would define the director’s films. Shallow Grave morphs from breezy humanistic comedy to Hitchcockian descent into paranoia and violence, but exudes an off-kilter dread even before that shift begins.

It helps that the trio of protagonists are portrayed with such charismatic contempt; an oxymoron for sure, but McGregor, Eccleston, and Fox all play their characters as dislikable assholes whose friendship and mischievous energy are infectious. Their flat feels like a powderkeg even before the suitcase full of money is introduced.

As with any story featuring an ill-gotten windfall, distrust, greed, and bloodshed soon worm their way into that volatile relationship. Shallow Grave’s approach to violence is disturbingly detached, presenting grisly complications as awkward and uncomfortable. But even in its darkest moments, Boyle’s neo-noir remains kinetic and stylish. Clever juxtapositions, shots, and plot swerves abound; Shallow Grave’s narrative is familiar but its execution is extremely assured.

Brotherhood of the Wolf
★★★½
Brotherhood of the Wolf is a movie I've wanted to see for years and it largely did not disappoint. A bold blend of period melodrama, monster movie, martial arts action, and conspiracy thriller, Brotherhood mixes all those facets with a dash of pulpy tone and gothic fairy tale. It's weird, unique, and always intriguing, even if the effects are dated and the fight choreography is too over-edited to appreciate Mark Dacascos' agile skills.
 

Arm Van Dam

Member
Mar 30, 2019
413
Illinois
1. What's your favorite Movie?
Either 12 Angry Men, Anatomy of a Murder, A Star is Born (1954), Dollars Trilogy, any of Hitchcock's films, Dr. Strangelove, His Girl Friday, All the President's Men, Meet Me in St. Louis, Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid, Django, The Wild Bunch, The Sting, Paths of Glory, The Big Sleep, Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, or In the Heat of the Night (1967), too many to name
2. Who's your favorite director?
Either George Cukor, Hitchcock, Norman Jewison, Milos Forman, Kubrick, Peter Weir, Frank Capra, Kurosawa, Sergio Leone, or Otto Preminger, too many to name
3. Who are your favorite actors/actresses?
James Stewart, Cary Grant, Kirk Douglas, Clark Gable, Judy Garland, Anne Bancroft, Greta Garbo, Saroise Ronan, Emma Stone, Paul Newman, Robert Redford, Humphrey Bogart, Keanu Reeves, Steve Buscemi, and Peter Sellers, too many to name
4. Favorite Genre(s)?
Drama, War, Action, Noir, Western
5. What's your favorite performance in film?
James Stewart in all 4 of Hitchcock's films, Judy Garland as Esther Blodgett (Vicki Lester) in A Star is Born (1954), Kirk Douglas as Colonel Dax in Paths of Glory, Cary Grant as Roger Thornhill in North by Northwest, and Sidney Poitier as Detective Virgil Tibbs in In the Heat of the Night, too many to name

--------------------
Films I watched from January to now (not seen in theaters)

Norma Rae (1979) - Thumbs Up, Sally Field is amazing as Norma Rae who you would root for in the face of suppporting unionization for her family and friends backed up by a great screenplay in the backdrop of North Carolina's textile industry

The Firm (1993) - Thumbs Up, either this or The Rainmaker is probably the best of any adaptation of John Grisham's novels, everyone is great in this especially Holly Hunter as Tammy.

Bullitt (1968) - Thumbs Up, the nearly 11-minute car chase alone which made the car chase make it worth watching

The Miracle Worker (1962) - Thumbs Up, This movie is what I like to call, the perfect adaptation of a Broadway play, everything from Bancroft and Duke's acting as Anne Sullivan and Helen Keller, respectively, the dining room scene, and everything else in director Arthur Penn's film who also directed the Broadway play, carries over from the play in precise powerful form even in 1962 it's just as powerful as ever. Highly recommended.

A Raisin in the Sun (1961) - Thumbs Up, An amazing adaptation of Lorraine Hansberry's 1959 groundbreaking Broadway play which she also wrote the screenplay, with a talented near all-black cast who reprised their roles from the play did just as impactful on the big screen as it was from the stage with issues as ever relevant as it was today with racial segregation. Highly recommended.

Glory (1989) - Thumbs Up, Possibly Broderick's best role since it takes place outside of his usual space of comedy as Robert Shaw with a talented supporting cast who played 54th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry and it's climatic battle of Fort Wagner is excellent.

Escape from Alcatraz (1979) - Thumbs up, The fifth and last collaboration for Don Siegel and Clint Eastwood came out with a thrilling conclusion with the 1962 prisoner escape filmed at a closed Alcatraz Island, this film makes you really feel you're at Alcatraz especially with the stunts done by Eastwood, Ward, and Thibeau themselves which ups the realism.
 

Borgnine

Member
Oct 25, 2017
878
Watched For All Mankind and it's still wonderful but as I feared it looks like a pile of puke next to Apollo 11. I swear there were a few identical shots, did these always exist in 70mm or have we come so far that they can make 16mm look like that?
 
Watched For All Mankind and it's still wonderful but as I feared it looks like a pile of puke next to Apollo 11. I swear there were a few identical shots, did these always exist in 70mm or have we come so far that they can make 16mm look like that?
I haven't gotten in the disc of it yet, but the only special feature on Apollo 11 pertains to the 65mm footage, so my preemptive guess is that due to the historical significance of the Apollo 11 mission, NASA spared no expense in terms of archiving the entirety of the journey. It's kind of ludicrous how good that footage looks and makes me kinda wish that NASA would have a film preservation side-business with how immaculate their efforts turned out to be.
 
Oct 27, 2017
1,392
Watched For All Mankind and it's still wonderful but as I feared it looks like a pile of puke next to Apollo 11. I swear there were a few identical shots, did these always exist in 70mm or have we come so far that they can make 16mm look like that?
This sounds crazy, I watched For All Mankind on my laptop when it was the Criterion Movie of the Week, and even on the small screen the visuals blew me away. Apollo 11 must look insane.
 

overcast

Member
Oct 25, 2017
6,106
Mostly agree with your thoughts here. Certainly not as funny as SOTD or Hot Fuzz but probably Wright's most honestly emotional movie up to this point. I would love to see Wright tackle some more serious dramatic elements eventually, but also that would waste one of the most inventive action directors. Curious to see how his next horror movie comes out.
If you film dorks hate comic book movies so much why do you bother watching them?

Wouldn't your time be better spent watching some experimental 5 hour German art house film shot entirely in someone's fridge?
I actually had to see burning again because of a date 🥵


Thats what it really felt like. Old people tackling youth issues. Lets contain memekami in books btw.
Lmfao, these two posts are sensational. Just, what?
 

godofcookery

Avenger
Oct 25, 2017
533
Brotherhood of the Wolf
★★★½
Brotherhood of the Wolf is a movie I've wanted to see for years and it largely did not disappoint. A bold blend of period melodrama, monster movie, martial arts action, and conspiracy thriller, Brotherhood mixes all those facets with a dash of pulpy tone and gothic fairy tale. It's weird, unique, and always intriguing, even if the effects are dated and the fight choreography is too over-edited to appreciate Mark Dacascos' agile skills.
Have you seen Drive starring Mark Dacascos and Kadeem Hardison?
 
Koko: A Talking Gorilla: An intriguing window into the life and activities of, well, the titular subject, almost right from the very beginning of Koko's ascent to the heights of the scientific community. The approach that the filmmakers take here swings towards one of impartiality as the footage is mainly of Koko and her trainer Francine Patterson in largely candid moments, which gives the film a bit of a nature documentary vibe and makes for some rather impressive moments of interaction between the two. Yet strangely, it has difficulties maintaining a strong pulse as a result of there not being a tremendous amount of variety in the handling of the material, and the small attempts at bridging the few tangents it does go on regarding the ethics of training Koko in the first place and what to do with her now that she was effectively caught between two worlds just aren't developed enough to be of much note and even misses some opportunities to address other points. The documentary almost comes off as a kind of reference work for professionals in the same scientific field, which does possess a lot of value to a casual viewer with the opportunity it provides for a glimpse into an unseen world, but it's hard for it to stick with a person that doesn't have this as a part of their daily lives. It's frustrating for me as I do see the importance of the footage, as I do wish that it was in more capable hands of taking this to even the most basic of logical conclusions.
 

jett

Community Resettler
Member
Oct 25, 2017
15,229
Brightburn is out on some international markets, including mine. Do we have any impressions of it? Trailers made it look like a neat concept, but I don't usually go for horror stuff.
 

Window

Member
Oct 27, 2017
4,420
In a Lonely Place: A truly excellent merger of film noir and romantic melodrama. The psychological depth this displays is so typical of Nicholas Ray's work, and yet it still blows my mind to see such care put into the characters here with how easily this could have diverted into tropes, further enhanced by the great performances from both Bogie and Gloria Grahame turn in for their characters and a really well-rounded supporting cast. It's also a credit to how well written the picture is that you can guess at pretty much every major plot element well in advance and still be on pins and needles throughout since you can't really be too sure as to how it will ultimately resolve with how well maintained the tension is throughout and having just enough uncertainty to satisfy the thriller aspects without overwhelming the heart of the film. Absolutely superb in every facet, and now I can safely say that 1950 produced one hell of a trifecta of noir-tinged showbiz films with this joining such exalted company as Sunset Boulevard and All About Eve.
Love this little scene from it
 
Oct 25, 2017
1,162
finished watching The Wandering Earth (2018).

The only thing that wandered off was my mind, being a combo of bored, flabbergasted at stupid shit, and legit scared for how little empathy China seems to have. (the whale shot, and then casually mentioning that half the human race died when the Earth's rotation stopped... )

You can pretend it's a nice spectacle but its politics are worn on its sleeves and horrifying to consider as existing in the real world.
 

Einchy

Member
Oct 25, 2017
22,655
Can You Ever Forgive Me?

It's no surprise that Melissa McCarthy and Richard E. Grant both got nominated, they acted their asses off. The film itself does a really great job painting the dead end and lonely life that the main character led. Wonderfully and depressingly reliable.