Mums make porn film for their kids to watch as part of new Channel 4 show

Patapuf

Member
Oct 26, 2017
3,413
A mother directing porn specifically for her son to watch it sounds supremely awkward. Also, this is totally going to be the plot of a lot of porn videos now.
 

Disclaimer

Member
Oct 25, 2017
5,244
The discourse here is as disappointing as I’d expect. Yeah, the “viewing party” bit is a bad idea, but their overarching point is... completely correct.

It isn’t just rape porn that’s potentially damaging, but the vast majority of hardcore professional porn, which can and does impart negative views, expectations, and and behavior on people — especially young people.

Obviously there’s other, healthier porn, and what they’re aiming to create does mostly exist (sans the “created by a council of moms” part), but there is a conversation to be had about the potential unhealthy effects of porn consumption, and how they could/should be combated.
 

Veelk

Member
Oct 25, 2017
3,922
I feel like the title is misleading. It implies that the moms will act in the porn for their sons, like starring themselves, which would be...ick. But I think that's what most people are reacting to, rather than the article.

Instead they are trying to create pornography that promotes healthier attitudes towards sex which is...good. Like, I guess it's a little weird for a parent to be a willing participant in helping their children discover their sexuality, but it's ultimately just an extension of "The talk" except made in video format with demonstrative visuals. They're basically trying to show them how to treat women right by creating content. Okay? Whats wrong with this?


Now, the comment at the end about the moms watching their completed porn with their sons, THAT is a bit weird. I'm not sure I would want to bond over my wank material with my parents.

But otherwise, this is pretty (admittedly weirdly) wholesome.
 

Maolfunction

Member
Oct 27, 2017
456
This will lead to the most horrific and mortifying post film conversation ever.

"Well, son, how erect are you right now?"
 
Oct 26, 2017
6,268
I'm really confused. Reading the article, and the quotes don't seem bad.

"We need to show kids that there's something else than this horrible [bleep] we see on the internet. If my son treated a woman like that I would kick his [bleep] to kingdom come.

"Porn doesn't represent normal women, the actors and actresses they use mislead kids. They need to realise it's not normal."
This seems pretty sane to me.
 

Danis Saur

Member
Oct 27, 2017
1,005
I liked the idea of making a porn that shows a vanilla, healthy sexual experience... until they mentioned they'll be watching it with their kids.

What.
 

DarthWalden

The Fallen
Oct 27, 2017
1,941
I think the need for some healthy, grounded, realistic porn is necessary.

However making it "for their kids" just seems incredibly wrong.
 

Lundren

Member
Oct 27, 2017
791
Maybe I missed something, but does this channel broadcast porn? They are planning to show the finished film on the channel, so if they don't allow porn broadcasts, why are we assuming that this is going to be hardcore porn? This could be a sex ed tier video for all we know. Are they even legally allowed to show underage people porn?
 

Principate

Member
Oct 31, 2017
6,046
How can it be an adult film if it's teenage friendly? They can't even legally show something on the level of a R18 film which wouldn't even be considered porn. This just sounds quite exploitative with a shocking premise to get viewers.

Unless these teenagers are really 18 plus.
 

Lord of Ostia

Member
Oct 27, 2017
11,335
The discourse here is as disappointing as I’d expect. Yeah, the “viewing party” bit is a bad idea, but their overarching point is... completely correct.

It isn’t just rape porn that’s potentially damaging, but the vast majority of hardcore professional porn, which can and does impart negative views, expectations, and and behavior on people — especially young people.

Obviously there’s other, healthier porn, and what they’re aiming to create does mostly exist (sans the “created by a council of moms” part), but there is a conversation to be had about the potential unhealthy effects of porn consumption, and how they could/should be combated.
I'm not sure a reality TV show is the best method for having that conversation though, or that random moms are the best people to be writing and directing healthier porn as opposed to trained and licensed sex therapists, nor is a 'family watch party' the right way to go about this rather than through sex education at school or personally with a therapist.

I totally agree with you that the intentions are good, but the methods seem way more interested in being 'shocking' and getting people to tune in than being instructional.
 

Doctor_Thomas

Member
Oct 27, 2017
2,345
The headline makes it sound worse than it actually is... but maybe some external insight is a good thing. Porn is fantasy and it can definitely cause unrealistic expectations and other issues, so maybe "teenager-friendly" healthy porn is a good thing...but I'm sure that exists, so the premise of this is just weird though.
 

Principate

Member
Oct 31, 2017
6,046
They could. The pornos they produce aren't being rated by the BBFC and an argument could be made that it's for educational purposes.
I really don't think that's how that works but I'm hardly an experment. I just don't remember seeing what would be classed as actual porn (as in two humans actually having sex) as part as my sex eductaion in high school and I haven't heard this being the case for anyone else. Plus this is being shown on TV so it has to be rated.
 

Doctor_Thomas

Member
Oct 27, 2017
2,345
I really don't think that's how that works but I'm hardly an experment. I just don't remember seeing what would be classed as actual porn (as in two humans actually having sex) as part as my sex eductaion in high school and I haven't heard this being the case for anyone else. Plus this is being shown on TV so it has to be rated.
The show is, doesn't mean the final product will be.
 

Disclaimer

Member
Oct 25, 2017
5,244
I'm not sure a reality TV show is the best method for having that conversation though, or that random moms are the best people to be writing and directing healthier porn as opposed to trained and licensed sex therapists, nor is a 'family watch party' the right way to go about this rather than through sex education at school or personally with a therapist.

I totally agree with you that the intentions are good, but the methods seem way more interested in being 'shocking' and getting people to tune in than being instructional.
Yeah, I agree. The whole ”viewing party” clickbait bit illustrates that Goal #1 is getting people to watch their reality TV show.

That said, while I don’t agree with the choice of medium, reality TV is popular and could — theoretically, lol — popularize the discussion around cultivating healthier, more realistic attitudes.

...It is the UK, though, so it could be executed or interpreted in all sorts of wrong puritanistic ways.

(On the subject of the viewing party, the way it’s worded and the legal challenges lead me to believe only their older children would voluntarily attend. Which is still weird, but less so.)
 
Dec 5, 2018
782
I really don't think that's how that works but I'm hardly an experment. I just don't remember seeing what would be classed as actual porn (as in two humans actually having sex) as part as my sex eductaion in high school and I haven't heard this being the case for anyone else. Plus this is being shown on TV so it has to be rated.
TV broadcasts are not rated by the BBFC, so it does not apply.
 

Principate

Member
Oct 31, 2017
6,046
The show is, doesn't mean the final product will be.
That's still one highly dodgy loop hole that I doubt a programme shown on TV will engage in if these teenagers are actually under 18.

TV broadcasts are not rated by the BBFC, so it does not apply.
They're not rated by the BBFC but they are rated. It's not some wildwest in terms of what you can put up there in regards to actual pornographic material.
 

Peradam

Member
Jan 11, 2018
413
Maybe I missed something, but does this channel broadcast porn?
No, but educational content is likely viewed much differently, and I believe this will fall under that category.

Channel 4 programming has always been a bit subversive compared with BBC and ITV. They famously televised Gunther von Hagens' live autopsy programme, they've had shows where a child was filmed eating chocolates filled with liqueur until they became drunk, simply as a test to see how many would be required for a 12-year-old to consume before they were over the drink-drive alcohol limit. Others such as Embarrassing Bodies regularly feature nudity, including exposed female genitalia (i.e. not just frontal). I can definitely imagine this show getting a pass from the censors.
 

Doctor_Thomas

Member
Oct 27, 2017
2,345
No, but educational content is likely viewed much differently, and I believe this will fall under that category.

Channel 4 programming has always been a bit subversive compared with BBC and ITV. They famously televised Gunther von Hagens' live autopsy programme, they've had shows where a child was filmed eating chocolates filled with liqueur until they became drunk, simply as a test to see how many would be required for a 12-year-old to consume before they were over the drink-drive alcohol limit. Others such as Embarrassing Bodies regularly feature nudity, including exposed female genitalia (i.e. not just frontal). I can definitely imagine this show getting a pass from the censors.
They also showed Naked Attraction, didn't they?
 

Mona

Member
Oct 30, 2017
11,055
"here son, mommy made some porn she think's will heat you up and make you cum"
 

Lord of Ostia

Member
Oct 27, 2017
11,335
Yeah, I agree. The whole ”viewing party” clickbait bit illustrates that Goal #1 is getting people to watch their reality TV show.

That said, while I don’t agree with the choice of medium, reality TV is popular and could — theoretically, lol — popularize the discussion around cultivating healthier, more realistic attitudes.

...It is the UK, though, so it could be executed or interpreted in all sorts of wrong puritanistic ways.

(On the subject of the viewing party, the way it’s worded and the legal challenges lead me to believe only their older children would voluntarily attend. Which is still weird, but less so.)
I think it just boils down to there being multiple ways to have dialogue about healthy attitudes towards sex and how porn can cause harm to developing teenage minds without making a reality TV show that is selling itself on shock value.

It's not impossible, cable news has occasionally done a half-decent job of it in the US.