My dachahund swallowed a baby bird whole.

NameUser

Member
Oct 25, 2017
7,262
In my head it dies from eating it. Like, that would add some much weight to it lol

Edit: I'm talking about the birds lol
 
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Deference

Member
Nov 17, 2017
338
Dogs eating small animals whole is a little unusual, but probably not much of a concern. I know my parents' dog was perfectly happy to go mice hunting out in the fields and he'd just bite their little necks broke and swallow them whole. No chewing, just straight down. It was mildly disconcerting the first time, but much much worse when he pooped them out. Disgusting mouse-shaped piles of fur and poo, how lovely.
 

Rory

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,492
Who cares what you consider "a bit"? (which by the way, my dog happily climbs into his crate for hours and hours to sleep or chill, so yes 1 hour to me is just a bit)

He put him in the crate for an hour in case he threw up from eating the bird. Your idea of what constitutes a dog needing a new home and owner over an hour in a crate for medical supervision purposes is the only „farfetched" thing here.
If you dont want a dirty flat dont get a dog.

Mistreating the dog does. Neglecting it, denying it enough room/movement etc.

If you look lower to my next post, you'll see I only meant in regards to the idea that his dog is better off in a different home with a different owner just because he put him in a crate for an hour. (and what is this nonsense that crate training is bullshit? Come on now)

Also, his post makes no sense, since OP didn't put his dog in there for punishment to begin with, but for supervision in case he throws up the bird. So it was irrelevant from the start.

And yeah, I know that if you "punish"/reprimand a dog, it needs to be *immediately* after the misdeed, otherwise they won't link the behaviour/consequence together after the fact. But I thought it was pretty common knowledge.
owners who make shortcuts like these in education, do that more than once. Crates are fine as long as they are free to leave. If you lock it up its actually illegal in many countries especially over longer periods.

Then you can put them into kennels as well, especially since they usually have more space in kennels than crates.

Over night for 8 hours, while you are at work, whenever your dog misbehaves. Crates have become the nightmare of “dog education”.

The dog killed/ate the bird due to instincts. Punishing instincts is useless. You need to give your dog a chance to actually “scratch that twitch” in a way that does not bother you.

If you dont want animals to throw up in your flat, then dont get animals. That bit of barf (pun intended) should not disgust you as pet owner.
 

Lotto

Member
Oct 28, 2017
668
Earth
You are locking up your dog as punishment for being a dog?

And this, dear Era, is why “crating” is total bullshit. It tempts people to use it as educational shortcut.

Hint: it does not work. The punishment and the action are not connected to one another any longer. A dog cant display “feeling sorry” because this emotion does not exist for them.

Maybe your dog would be better off rehomed. Not “locked up randomly” and with an owner who does not humanizes their dog.
 

Parch

Member
Nov 6, 2017
2,511
Dogs are den animals. They want a safe space. They want their own private area where they can sleep or bring their toys and treats and enjoy them without the concern of other pets or people disturbing them and stealing their stuff. You can provide this space with a kennel. If you don't provide a den, then dogs will crawl into a small dark space like behind a couch or under a bed to find their own secure space. That's not always the most safe or comfortable space for them.

Most dogs love their kennel or crate. It shouldn't be used as punishment because that's not respecting what they want it for. But it can be used as way to secure your dog when you are away when they are properly crate trained. Most dogs don't mind it at all when they are used to it and will just snooze in their safe space.

There is nothing wrong with crate training and providing them with their den. It's what they want.
 

TalonJH

Member
Oct 27, 2017
1,685
There is dog ice cream?
We buy our dog Frosty Paws by Purina.


A lot of places where you buy ice cream, like Dairy Queen will give you a free cup of vanilla ice cream for your dog if you like. It's usually called a "Pup Cup."


As for OP: Yeah, they do things like that sometimes. You'll have to mostly accept it as you can really only "try" to curb his instincts. He'll be alright though.
 
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Dekuman

Member
Oct 27, 2017
7,476
Cats kill more avians than dogs to the point where it's a public policy issue
But on Era the dog gets a thread
:(
 

Rory

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,492
Dogs are den animals. They want a safe space. They want their own private area where they can sleep or bring their toys and treats and enjoy them without the concern of other pets or people disturbing them and stealing their stuff. You can provide this space with a kennel. If you don't provide a den, then dogs will crawl into a small dark space like behind a couch or under a bed to find their own secure space. That's not always the most safe or comfortable space for them.

Most dogs love their kennel or crate. It shouldn't be used as punishment because that's not respecting what they want it for. But it can be used as way to secure your dog when you are away when they are properly crate trained. Most dogs don't mind it at all when they are used to it and will just snooze in their safe space.

There is nothing wrong with crate training and providing them with their den. It's what they want.
A crate is actually the worst solution to “protect it from other animals”. Its one way in and one way out: they are easily trapped. Cats paws can enter it easily. There is a reason why you dont introduce pets to one another in crates. They dont feel safe when their escape routes are limited. And same goes for later conflicts.

The “safe place” does not need to be lockable. The safe place can be anywhere open. Our dog loves the sofa as his safe place. Its open, its not lockable, and imaging: we even have other pets.

The main problem is of course people abusing it as educational shortcut.
 

Adam_Roman

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,505
It's part of the territory of being a pet owner. All you can really do is try to teach him that hunting is bad if you don't want him to hunt. When I was a kid, our dog hunted moles in the backyard. She wanted to tear up the yard looking for them but eventually got her to stop digging holes, which led to less mole-murder.