My Supervisor at work Used caps to put EMPHASIS on things I shouldn't do as critique. Should I let her know she's basically raising her voice at me?

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Oct 25, 2017
3,262
Milwaukee, WI
She probably has problems with people NOT READING her emails and is tired of getting questions she already ANSWERED in the email.

Heck I do it on this forum because people seriously DONT READ.
 

SpoonyBob

Member
Oct 27, 2017
953
Arkansas
This doesn't feel like the kind of thing I would ever spend capital on bringing up.

It's annoying, but it's not worth bringing up.
 

Shadow2222

The Fallen
Oct 27, 2017
419
That's not something worth raising a fuss about. Everyone interprets the tone of text differently, so her intention may simply be to make it standout and more memorable.
 
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Mike_C

Mike_C

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Banned
Aug 22, 2018
1,766
It's tricky to be sure, but I'm also an intern, and don't want to come off as a doormat.

I also need to be careful, as I can be scathing and don't want to get myself in trouble.

Edit: Shadow222, yeah that's what I also considered.
 

platypotamus

Member
Oct 25, 2017
970
I am not sure what your next move is if you're like "boss it kinda seemed like you were yelling at me in that email" and then she's like "yeah, I was, don't fuck that shit up"
 

Mass_Pincup

The Fallen
Oct 25, 2017
4,372
You should let it slide, not worth risking your working relationship over some CAPS.

If she's doing it in person though...
 

Robin64

Member
Oct 25, 2017
4,772
England
Some people use caps rather than bold, it's quite normal.

Though where I work, some people type entire emails in caps. I cry a little inside when I see one of those.
 

Sincerest

Banned
Jan 22, 2018
606
Reply to her via email.

Along the veins of.

Thanks for taking the time to write such a GREAT email. WONDERFUL JOB. THE BEST.
 

Alucrid

Chicken Photographer
Member
Oct 25, 2017
6,032
It's tricky to be sure, but I'm also an intern, and don't want to come off as a doormat.

I also need to be careful, as I can be scathing and don't want to get myself in trouble.

Edit: Shadow222, yeah that's what I also considered.
this list of critiques is probably getting longer as we speak
 

leafcutter

Member
Feb 14, 2018
961
One of my coworkers has to do cataloging, in which the info is usually entered in all caps. So she just leaves caps lock on all the time. Everyone complains about how angry and rude she is when she messages people, because she'll be like "HI, COULD YOU PLEASE DOUBLE CHECK THE ORDERS FROM LAST WEEK BEFORE I PUT THEM IN THE SYSTEM? THANKS."

tbh it's kind of hilarious
 

DirtyLarry

Member
Oct 27, 2017
2,032
Many people at my job, and elsewhere for that matter, use all caps to emphasize things.
ESPECIALLY since most people are replying to email from their phones these days. Much harder to bold text from your phone then from a laptop.
Truly making something out of nothing here.
 

Faiz

Member
Oct 26, 2017
2,128
It’s just a couple words? Not like whole sentences?

yeah +1 for let that go. Never heard anyone interpret a few words emphasized that way as “raising their voice” at the reader. Better to show you can take criticism in the manner it is intended than to come off as precious.
 

Era Uma Vez

Member
Feb 5, 2020
212
In a work environment, caps is no different than using bold.
Honestly, if you bring this up to her, saying things like "you're basically raising my voice at me", she's gonna roll her eyes, and blacklist you mentally, at the very best.
 

RadzPrower

Member
Jan 19, 2018
1,112
I'm generally providing instructions rather than input on someone else's actions, so I do tend to emphasize words like "not", "don't", or basically anything that can easily be interpreted as the inverse. I obviously try and avoid inverse statements, but sometimes you have to make a point in instructions that certain things are to be avoided and emphasizing that can be important since some people might miss the inverting word or phrase.
 

Euphoria

Member
Oct 25, 2017
3,798
As an intern go walk in there and tell them to watch how they address you.

Afterwards please return and let us know how it goes.
 

Kace

Banned
Feb 10, 2020
207
the system
It doesn't seem like the kind of thing that you'd want to make your life harder about now does it?

Because ten to one shes not going to take kindly to your critique so unless you are perfect at your job or have connections above her head I'd keep it to myself
 

Dekuman

Member
Oct 27, 2017
9,002
I bold things I want to emphasize but caps can stand in

It's not necessarily shouting unless the whole email or document is In caps.

Some legal and contract documents use Caps to emphasize points
 

h1nch

Member
Dec 12, 2017
1,202
Yeah, I think you should let this one go.

You're being overly sensitive.
 

Gwarm

Member
Nov 13, 2017
467
Part of being an intern is sucking it up and being a doormat. You literally have no leverage in this situation.
 

RadzPrower

Member
Jan 19, 2018
1,112
One of my coworkers has to do cataloging, in which the info is usually entered in all caps. So she just leaves caps lock on all the time. Everyone complains about how angry and rude she is when she messages people, because she'll be like "HI, COULD YOU PLEASE DOUBLE CHECK THE ORDERS FROM LAST WEEK BEFORE I PUT THEM IN THE SYSTEM? THANKS."

tbh it's kind of hilarious
I've been known to do this in our company IM since I work in a terminal-based environment where everything is capitalized and case-sensitive, so I'll be working and have Caps Lock on and forget to turn it off before the IM.
 

Tyaren

Member
Oct 25, 2017
8,003
It's tricky to be sure, but I'm also an intern, and don't want to come off as a doormat.

I also need to be careful, as I can be scathing and don't want to get myself in trouble.
Yeah, better let it go, especially after knowing that last part. ;)

Also, it isn't being a doormat when you refrain from advising her how to in your opinion properly type.
 

Horseticuffs

Member
Oct 27, 2017
1,086
Florida
I've worked with a ton of great people in a professional environment that couldn't craft an email to save their lives. Or, alternately, maybe they just don't care on the level you do.

My former Director, whom I adore and respect the hell out of, had random ellipses, constant missing punctuation, etc.

My current Director doesn't have the best English skills and asks me to help her proof her emails and such all the time.

Writing and spelling as correctly as I know how is important to me, but as much as it pains me to say it, not everyone puts the same weight on it.


I wouldn't say anything. Put the email in the context of your relationship with the person.
 

Rendering...

Member
Oct 30, 2017
10,837
Unfortunately, as an intern you're not really in a position to critique her unprofessional business communication. But yes, using caps like that is abrasive and shouldn't be done.
 

SturokBGD

Member
Oct 25, 2017
2,124
Ontario
Triggered by uppercase letters at work...

I need to get off this planet.

Fire me out into space in a rocket.

DIRECTLY INTO THE SUN.
 

iksenpets

Member
Oct 26, 2017
3,158
Dallas, TX
I don’t think trying to raise it as an issue is going to get much done for you. Caps are an acceptable form of emphasis, even if they’re less clear in meaning than italics, which far too few people use. Also, is the supervisor older? Older people are just bad at conveying tone in text in general, if they didn’t grow up online. Ultimately though, I think making an issue of it will do less to convince people you’re not a doormat, and more convince them that you’re sensitive and picky. You’re right that there are smarter ways to do it than caps, and caps can be read as rude, but it’s also not an argument you’re likely to win.
 

MIMIC

Member
Dec 18, 2017
3,738
Respond with: "MISS ME with that BULLSHIT"

But seriously, unless you can address it in a non-confrontational, joking way, I wouldn't say anything.

EDIT: You're an intern? Nah...don't say anything.
 

PogChamp

The Fallen
Oct 27, 2017
7,466
Never correct a supervisor on anything. The chance that they take it into earnest consideration and not as a slight is less than 1%.
 

RedStep

Avenger
Oct 27, 2017
1,420
I use bold and italics for these things, but sometimes you’re in plain text so I’ll cap a word if I have to. So to answer your question, go set her straight first thing today.
 
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