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NBA Regular Season 2019-2020 | OT2 | Steph Curry's Manageable Load

Liquidsnake

Member
Oct 27, 2017
8,201
I’m not going to post too much today. I’ll just say this: Tonight’s Lakers v Rockets game depends on the mood of the refs, and that sucks.

Lakers winning or losing depends on if the Refs are in the mood for watching a comedic actor who practices flailing in the mirror every night to master his craft of selling. Very sad.
 

Marz

Member
Oct 30, 2017
1,686
I’m not going to post too much today. I’ll just say this: Tonight’s Lakers v Rockets game depends on the mood of the refs, and that sucks.

Lakers winning or losing depends on if the Refs are in the mood for watching a comedic actor who practices flailing in the mirror every night to master his craft of selling. Very sad.
Very true! Tremendous actor! Bad guy!
 
Oct 28, 2017
4,876
I’m going to say it again: Bradley Beal is the biggest dumbass in sports. The man could’ve been on a playoff contender this year had he just demanded out and not signed that extension. Dude has started to become very, very bitter about his situation.
Beal is set to start earning $34 million and up a year. How is he the biggest dumbass in sports? At the end of the day, it’s about getting paid. If you accomplish that, you’ve done the most important thing.
 

Christian

Member
Oct 25, 2017
5,552
Beal is set to start earning $34 million and up a year. How is he the biggest dumbass in sports? At the end of the day, it’s about getting paid. If you accomplish that, you’ve done the most important thing.
Maybe the most important to you, and to him. And if that’s what he values most, great for him. But he can’t get frustrated with the situation if his biggest goal was to get paid.
 
Oct 28, 2017
4,876
Maybe the most important to you, and to him. And if that’s what he values most, great for him. But he can’t get frustrated with the situation if his biggest goal was to get paid.
Sure you can. People are multi-faceted. He made the most important choice in securing his wealth given that he has an injury history. He can still be frustrated with the team’s performance because the Wizards sucking isn’t some fundamental truth that he should acknowledge. At the end of the day, he’s getting paid like he wants and he’s on a team not doing well. He’s fine even if he’s annoyed by them not doing well. No point in calling somebody a dumbass for making several orders of magnitude than you make while being kinda frustrated with recent results.
 

NinjaScooter

Member
Oct 25, 2017
24,149
Maybe the most important to you, and to him. And if that’s what he values most, great for him. But he can’t get frustrated with the situation if his biggest goal was to get paid.
Sure he can. He’s well within his right to both get paid what he is worth and complain if the front office is not doing a good job of putting a good team around him. It’s not an either/or (or at least shouldn’t be) and positioning it as such only serves to let incompetently managed organizations off the hook.
 

Christian

Member
Oct 25, 2017
5,552
Sure he can. He’s well within his right to both get paid what he is worth and complain if the front office is not doing a good job of putting a good team around him. It’s not an either/or (or at least shouldn’t be) and positioning it as such only serves to let incompetently managed organizations off the hook.
Yes, because absolving a player for taking the big payday with an organization that has never been run competently is in no way letting him off the hook.

Of course, I misspoke. He absolutely can get frustrated. He can do whatever he wants, and with how much leverage players have in the modern NBA, he can force himself out of he’s unhappy. So good on him. My point, actually, was more that he can’t be surprised that this is happening in Washington, and it’s my fault for expressing my thoughts so poorly. He definitely put his payday over playing for a competitive team, and he bears some of that responsibility. He’s wasting years of his prime playing for a bottom feeder, and I’m sure he’s crying himself to sleep at night on his piles of money.
 

NinjaScooter

Member
Oct 25, 2017
24,149
Yes, because absolving a player for taking the big payday with an organization that has never been run competently is in no way letting him off the hook.

Of course, I misspoke. He absolutely can get frustrated. He can do whatever he wants, and with how much leverage players have in the modern NBA, he can force himself out of he’s unhappy. So good on him. My point, actually, was more that he can’t be surprised that this is happening in Washington, and it’s my fault for expressing my thoughts so poorly. He definitely put his payday over playing for a competitive team, and he bears some of that responsibility. He’s wasting years of his prime playing for a bottom feeder, and I’m sure he’s crying himself to sleep at night on his piles of money.
I mean, I think the problem I have with this line of thinking is that it almost frames it as a player signing a contract that is commensurate to their market value (which is probably still underpaid thanks to the salary cap surpassing players worth) is a bad thing. Why should he need to be "absolved" for having the audacity to get paid what he is worth? That line of thinking only serves to reinforce what the owners of the league want fans to think: That players getting paid their worth is a bad thing. That team success and player financial wealth are mutually exclusive. He's not the GM. He's not the President. He's not the owner. Its not his responsibility to put fielding a competitive team over his own pay day.
 

Christian

Member
Oct 25, 2017
5,552
I mean, I think the problem I have with this line of thinking is that it almost frames it as a player signing a contract that is commensurate to their market value (which is probably still underpaid thanks to the salary cap surpassing players worth) is a bad thing. Why should he need to be "absolved" for having the audacity to get paid what he is worth? That line of thinking only serves to reinforce what the owners of the league want fans to think: That players getting paid their worth is a bad thing. That team success and player financial wealth are mutually exclusive. He's not the GM. He's not the President. He's not the owner. Its not his responsibility to put fielding a competitive team over his own pay day.
I have to admit, I don’t know the exact specifics of how much he stood to lose by not re-signing with the Wizards.
 

NinjaScooter

Member
Oct 25, 2017
24,149
The thing is, you are framing it like he took that money from Washington over taking money from a successful, well run franchise. That's misleading. That was not the decision he was faced with. He was not a free agent. Because of the way the NBA is structured, because of how free agency and player control works, it was that or nothing. And it was designed that way intentionally, to both try and suppress player salaries, and to try and dissuade players from leaving the teams that drafted them. Sure he could have taken the risk and waited his contract out until free agency, but why should he? If he tore his knee or achilles in the next 12 months the same people clowning him now for taking his money would be clowning him for not securing the bag when he had the chance.
 

Christian

Member
Oct 25, 2017
5,552
The thing is, you are framing it like he took that money from Washington over taking money from a successful, well run franchise. That's misleading. That was not the decision he was faced with. He was not a free agent. Because of the way the NBA is structured, because of how free agency and player control works, it was that or nothing. And it was designed that way intentionally, to both try and suppress player salaries, and to try and dissuade players from leaving the teams that drafted them. Sure he could have taken the risk and waited his contract out until free agency, but why should he? If he tore his knee or achilles in the next 12 months the same people clowning him now for taking his money would be clowning him for not securing the bag when he had the chance.
So you’re saying he had no other options?
 

Christian

Member
Oct 25, 2017
5,552
what other options did he have besides take the money or take the risk and wait a year or two for free agency?
My question was totally earnest. I love basketball, I love watching the game, but I’d be a total liar if I said I was familiar with the CBA, or the specific intricacies of how certain players forced themselves off of teams and got lucrative extensions at preferred trade destinations and things like that, or how much of a difference between a player’s salary would be by staying with their draft team, versus opting to sign a contract elsewhere.