New on Steam: Remote Play Together (play local co-op games, online)

texhnolyze

Member
Oct 25, 2017
13,175
Indonesia


Basically, this is like Parsec, but officially developed and integrated for Steam. Planned for October 21.

While most co-op/multiplayer games are online anyway nowadays, lots of games (old and new) would benefit from this, including Cuphead, Rayman, and even Tales of games. This will also help smaller indie devs to implement co-op/multiplayer without having to integrate online to their games.

Update: Ars Technica article.
On a more technical level, the host's computer renders the game in question while also shouldering two other burdens: it must stream its game video to other participants, and it must juggle all incoming buttons and commands from other players. Valve's email promises that this will support a 1080p video signal sent to other players at a 60 frames-per-second refresh, though all players must have at least a 10Mbps connection for "a successful low-latency connection."
 
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Vagabond

Member
Oct 26, 2017
1,236
United States
If they get it as low a latency as Parsec, it may be the new standard for Ultimate Marvel vs Capcom 3 online play/all the SNK Steam ports
 

IIFloodyII

Member
Oct 26, 2017
10,918
Is this streaming? How is this implemented into every game with local multiplayer?
On PS4, you basically just stream your PS4 to the other person and the other person is treated as if they just connected a controller. So I assume it'll work in a similar way. So not really required for the games to implement support, it kinda just tricks the system for local co-op.
 

sauce

Member
Oct 25, 2017
389
Is this streaming? How is this implemented into every game with local multiplayer?
Yeah it's streaming through remote play. All games with local multiplayer are tagged as such on the steam store, so they're probably just grabbing the games from that. It's most likely an API just like their remote play touch controls they implemented earlier
 

Anteater

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,330
Nvidia already has this I think but I never tried it, not to mention I stopped installing their client. Steam will probably make it easier for me to try with friends.
 

XR.

Member
Nov 22, 2018
1,301
That's perfect timing as I just finished categorizing my library, with offline co-op being one prominent category.
 
Oct 25, 2017
344
Been using Parsec for a while, but I'm glad to see Steam adding the feature as well. It really is a great feature.
 

Arthands

Banned
Oct 26, 2017
5,097
Parse is great but I'll welcome this too. I can play Overcooked with my girlfriend now
 

SunBroDave

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,202
User Banned (3 days): trolling
bUt VaLvE dOeSn'T dO aNyThInG tThEy'Re JuSt A sToReFrOnT!!!!!11!!!!
 

Tommcatt

Member
Apr 26, 2019
274
Now this is what I'm talking about. I feel like all my PC party / co op games are better purchases now.
 

AshenOne

Member
Feb 21, 2018
696
See people for features like this I stuck with steam because any game I buy is automatically enabled with these features once its in my Steam library.
 

Xclash

Member
Oct 25, 2017
836
See people for features like this I stuck with steam because any game I buy is automatically enabled with these features once its in my Steam library.
Indeed but the people that you are talking to aren't going to see this thread or even bother clicking on it. They will just downplay it in another thread.
 

Nabs

Member
Oct 26, 2017
5,047
This makes me very happy. I use Parsec (and used to use Game Stream), but they both come with their issues and annoyances. Remote Play built right into Steam would probably solve every problem I have with those programs.
 

Ionic

Member
Oct 31, 2017
1,385
This really is a logical extension of the remote play feature. If remote play involves just sending the video to a client and receiving input, then why can't it just send it to multiple clients and receive multiple inputs? This will really breathe life into some local multiplayer only games.

Now I just need the reverse; get to it, Valve!
What would the reverse be?
 

jetsetrez

Member
Oct 27, 2017
179
While most co-op/multiplayer games are online anyway nowadays ...
As someone who was looking for new coop games to play with a friend over summer, I actually would highly disagree with this. It's actually really surprising how many coop games only have local coop on Steam. Even recently released stuff like River City Girls, where the developer has even previously released games with online coop.

For me if this actually works well this could legit be one of the best features Steam has added in a looong time. There have been so many cool looking coop games I've been interested in playing with a friend but unable to since he's in another state.
 

saci

Member
Oct 25, 2017
2,477
Oh, I wonder if it'd be possible to support input from 2 different keyboards and mice.
 

Phoenixazure

Member
Oct 27, 2017
585
I wonder what the net code is like. Would be kind of funny if using this to do local versus ends up being better for some fighters than the actual online multiplayer
 

Putosaure

Member
Oct 27, 2017
1,112
France
That's neat. I wish they would just take the inputs from each player instead of a whole video stream. Kaillera did it fifteen years ago with emulation, it could be done and save some bandwidth
 

Edward850

Software & Netcode Engineer at Nightdive Studios
Verified
Apr 5, 2019
54
That's neat. I wish they would just take the inputs from each player instead of a whole video stream. Kaillera did it fifteen years ago with emulation, it could be done and save some bandwidth
That's not technologically feasible without spinning up an entire virtual machine with clock-cycle specific control (i.e full CPU emulation) to run the game in. Kaillera could do it for emulators because the emulator itself could be controlled by Kaillera, i.e how many frames it runs and when, and any other operating environments such as system time controlling deterministic behaviours like random seed generation.
You can't do that directly with an independent program because that program itself has direct access to behaviours such as the system clock, and also indirect behaviours that are even more nuanced such as delta time framerate compensation for physics engines which introduces non-deterministic results. And that's with me trying to simplify the problem, it's a very deep rabbit hole from here on.