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No-deal Brexit travel warning: don’t go on holiday after March 29

Oct 27, 2017
5,790
#1
Families will be advised not to book holidays after next March, according to contingency plans being drawn up to prepare for a no-deal Brexit.

The proposed guidance, which will shock the travel industry, was expected to be discussed at last week’s cancelled cabinet meeting, after civil servants were told to ramp up emergency planning.

Senior officials have explored the idea with at least one cabinet minister and discussed the impact that the advice could have on specific tour operators amid fears it might bankrupt them. A leak inquiry was under way in No 10 last night to establish how the proposal became public.
No-deal planning is expected to be top of the agenda when the cabinet meets on Tuesday. A paper circulated to ministers has three options on Brexit: no deal, May’s deal or revoking article 50.

A group of ministers including Sajid Javid, Jeremy Hunt, Stephen Barclay, Gavin Williamson and Penny Mordaunt plan to use the meeting to push for no deal to become the “central planning assumption”. Hunt said he was positive about a no deal and that he “would like to have a crack” at being prime minister. “I’ve always thought that even in a no-deal situation this is a great country. We’ll find a way to flourish and prosper,” he told The Sunday Telegraph.
https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/...g-dont-go-on-holiday-after-march-29-jnfmrgsj9

Get out now while you still can, UK-Era!!
 
Apr 27, 2018
833
#3
Hunt said he was positive about a no deal and that he “would like to have a crack” at being prime minister. “I’ve always thought that even in a no-deal situation this is a great country. We’ll find a way to flourish and prosper,” he told The Sunday Telegraph
Ah Tory egos ruining the country, sounds about right.
 
Oct 25, 2017
67
#5
I assume they mean don't book now for a holiday after March as no-one knows how the border will work, not that we'll all be banned from leaving the country from March 30th. Hopefully these kind of stories will keep putting the pressure on to call the whole thing off.
 
Oct 25, 2017
1,708
#6
This has already been the position in our household for some time - we’re not booking anything until the dust has settled and we know what terms the UK will exist on. Even if I were an optimist and believed in a favourable outcome of the negotiations, the pound is far too volatile at the moment.

There is, at least, the schadenfreude of the inevitable shocked gammons who didn’t realise their leave vote might actually have an impact on their Benidorm holidays.
 
Oct 25, 2017
6,433
#8
OK...…...I guess after No Deal Brexit.....the English are outlaws who can be hunted for sport across the continent!

It is like the Purge but for Europe!
 
Oct 27, 2017
1,973
#12
Why would it impact on holidays taken outside of Europe? We already have long established travel guidelines with countries like the USA for example.
 
Oct 27, 2017
1,973
#16
I'm assuming it's the sheer level of uncertainty, which also affects things like how we manage our airspace.
Yeah that makes sense. Although you don't fly over any of the rest of Europe to get to the USA but I can see how airspace would be an issue for other routes.
 
Oct 26, 2017
4,322
Canada
#18
They're denying it with their favourite stock response.


BBC News: Ministers deny planning no-deal Brexit holiday warnings

Downing Street has dismissed claims that people will be warned not to book holidays beyond March 2019 as part of no-deal Brexit contingency plans.
It comes after the Sunday Times said senior officials had examined the idea.
But a No 10 spokesperson rejected the report as "categorically untrue."
And travel agents' body Abta told the BBC: "The European Commission has said that even in a no-deal scenario, flights will still operate between the UK and EU, and a visa is not required."
 
OP
OP
chadskin
Oct 27, 2017
5,790
#19
I assume they mean don't book now for a holiday after March as no-one knows how the border will work, not that we'll all be banned from leaving the country from March 30th. Hopefully these kind of stories will keep putting the pressure on to call the whole thing off.
On 13 August 1961, work began on what was to become the Berlin Wall, only two months after Ulbricht had emphatically denied that there were such plans ("Nobody has the intention of building a wall"), thereby mentioning the word "wall" for the very first time.
This is how it starts!
 
Oct 25, 2017
4,176
#21
What a time to be alive, Brits.

Is this why I saw so many British tourists in Krakow a month ago? I heard British accents more than any other accent there.

P.S. In the event of a No Deal Brexit, is there a possibility for the UK to emulate a USA style travel relationship with the EU? I.E. 90 continuous days of visa-free travel within the Schengen Zone?

Obviously that doesn't solve work visas. But I'm just talking about sheer movement.
 
Oct 25, 2017
2,760
#22
Yeah that makes sense. Although you don't fly over any of the rest of Europe to get to the USA but I can see how airspace would be an issue for other routes.
Another factor is that because the EU - and neighbouring regions you would reach through it, like the wider Mediterranean - is such an important market to airline operators, knocks to business there could have effects on all their operations.
 
#26
P.S. In the event of a No Deal Brexit, is there a possibility for the UK to emulate a USA style travel relationship with the EU? I.E. 90 continuous days of visa-free travel within the Schengen Zone?

Obviously that doesn't solve work visas. But I'm just talking about sheer movement.
That is indeed the plan, UK residents will pay 7€ for 90 days access to the EU, which is valid for 3 years. Unless there is a no deal Brexit in which case we may need to apply for a visa.
 
Oct 28, 2017
915
#27
Stories like this do May a favour since her response is always "vote for my deal then" but I still don't see anything that can get her deal through. Her playing chicken with parliament is potentially one of the most damaging acts to this country since Dodgy Dave called the referendum.
 
Oct 26, 2017
10,789
#29
How open is the EU to having me move back to Germany and claim political asylum?
I think it won't be that much of a problem if you have a job ready to go to here, and how good your German holds up is also a factor I assume. I'd say it would be an easier ordeal before this whole shitshow is finalized though...
 
Oct 25, 2017
3,038
#30
Why would it impact on holidays taken outside of Europe? We already have long established travel guidelines with countries like the USA for example.
Our air services agreement (ASA) with the USA is through the EU. If we crash out and don't agree an independent ASA with them then we don't have the legal right to land in the US. There's also matters such as recognition of pilot licenses and safety certificates which could be in a very nebulous legal state post no-deal.

The nightmare scenario of a plane crashing post no-deal, only to discover that neither the pilot or the plane had legally valid licenses/safety certificates, is one that any airline company would like to avoid at all costs.
 
Oct 29, 2017
1,082
#32
God this whole thing is so stupid. How two of the world’s greatest powers got fucked in the ass so hard by Russian trolls will really be something to behold when the history books are written
 
Oct 28, 2017
1,558
#33
I'm really doubting planes will stop travelling to EU on no deal maybe for one day to sort out what information they need to process (though this should be sorted before a no deal brexit happens).

That is indeed the plan, UK residents will pay 7€ for 90 days access to the EU, which is valid for 3 years. Unless there is a no deal Brexit in which case we may need to apply for a visa.
I thought that 7€ pass would be for if there is a deal or not (as the UK gets added to list of countries available for it like the US will be using it)
 
Oct 27, 2017
4,231
#35
God this whole thing is so stupid. How two of the world’s greatest powers got fucked in the ass so hard by Russian trolls will really be something to behold when the history books are written
Reducing Brexit down to Russian trolls is some pretty insane deflection. They certainly helped, sure but there are bigger causes of the vote going the way it did.
 
Oct 25, 2017
1,313
UK
#40
Hunt said he was positive about a no deal and that he “would like to have a crack” at being prime minister. “I’ve always thought that even in a no-deal situation this is a great country. We’ll find a way to flourish and prosper,” he told The Sunday Telegraph.
What an absolute Jeremy Hunt.
 
Oct 27, 2017
1,973
#42
Our air services agreement (ASA) with the USA is through the EU. If we crash out and don't agree an independent ASA with them then we don't have the legal right to land in the US. There's also matters such as recognition of pilot licenses and safety certificates which could be in a very nebulous legal state post no-deal.

The nightmare scenario of a plane crashing post no-deal, only to discover that neither the pilot or the plane had legally valid licenses/safety certificates, is one that any airline company would like to avoid at all costs.
That makes a lot of sense. Thanks for the explanation.
 
#44
I'm really doubting planes will stop travelling to EU on no deal maybe for one day to sort out what information they need to process (though this should be sorted before a no deal brexit happens).



I thought that 7€ pass would be for if there is a deal or not (as the UK gets added to list of countries available for it like the US will be using it)
Sorry you're right, the 7€ will in a deal or no deal case, I missed that detail. The possible delays will be at passport control and to a lesser extent customs. For UK citizens arriving at EU airports (and vice versa), you'll need to present a passport, a reason for your stay and proof (ie hotel booking, return ticket), proof of funds, and from 2021 a valid ETIS (will probably be on a database tied to passport number though, also there will probably be a UK equivalent for EU citizens). In theory that should be quick but to go from a quick scan of a passport to that will mean queues at unprepared airports. For UK citizens arriving back home, customs will actually have to do some work and will no longer be absent for EU arrivals due to VAT and customs charges now being payable.

Some of this could be skipped in an emergency but laws are laws, they can only do so much.

Honestly airports aren't the biggest problem, freight ports such as Dover and the channel tunnel will be a colossal headache in a no deal scenario.

EDIT: I did also forget to mention that there may be complications with pilot licenses etc but I don't know the details of the impact that could have to be honest, much like the government doesn't I suppose.
 

plagiarize

Yearning to breathe free
Moderator
Oct 25, 2017
5,188
Cape Cod, MA
#45
The wife and I were planning to visit the UK in early April to celebrate our fifteenth wedding anniversary. We changed those plans a month or two back so we didn't have to worry about how well or badly Brexit was going. I wouldn't plan to travel to or from the UK in April unless you have to.
 
Oct 25, 2017
625
Australia
#48
I’m in the midst of planning a European holiday for July next year that includes a week in the UK. Am I best changing those plans?

Edit: from Australia
 
Oct 25, 2017
403
Yurop
#49
I get that european travels might be effected but why international?
I think Uzzy did a really good job at explaining it.

To further the point, this is what the EU Brexit preparedness notice states:
2. INTERNATIONAL ASPECTS
As of the withdrawal date, the United Kingdom will automatically cease to be covered by air transport agreements of the Union, whether these have been entered into by the Union alone (e.g. the Air Transport Agreement with Switzerland6) or by the Union and its Member States acting jointly (e.g. the Air Transport Agreement with the USA7). This has, in particular, consequences as regards access to designation/traffic rights and other areas covered by the said agreements.

o Air carriers of the United Kingdom:
Air carriers of the United Kingdom will no longer enjoy traffic rights under any air transport agreement to which the Union is a party, be it to or from the territory of the United Kingdom, be it to or from the territory of any of the EU Member States.

Air carriers of the United Kingdom will no longer have access to designation/traffic rights so far available under the bilateral air transport agreements between EU Member States and a third country on account of the principle of EU designation accepted by the third country concerned.

o Air carriers of any of the EU Member States:
Air carriers of the EU Member States will no longer enjoy traffic rights to or from the territory of the United Kingdom granted to Union carriers by a third country under any air transport agreement to which the Union is a party.

Rights under the said agreements as regards, inter alia, cooperative market arrangements including leasing, intermodal service or operational flexibility may be affected if, and to the extent to which, they are exercised in the territory of the United Kingdom or in connection with carriers of the United Kingdom.

Air carriers of the EU Member States may no longer have access to designation/traffic rights so far available under the bilateral air transport agreements between the United Kingdom and a third country on account of the principle of EU designation accepted by the third country concerned.

o Air carriers of countries which are not Member States of the EU:
Air carriers of countries which are not Member States of the EU will no longer benefit from access to traffic rights to or from the territory of the United Kingdom, or any other rights where these have been granted to their country under any air transport agreement to which the Union is a party.
Basically if there is no deal, UK can turn into a no-fly zone

sources:
European commission brexit preparedness notices: https://ec.europa.eu/info/brexit/brexit-preparedness/preparedness-notices_en#move
direct link to pdf: https://ec.europa.eu/info/sites/info/files/file_import/air_transport_en.pdf
 
Oct 25, 2017
1,789
#50
You all have to understand: The United Kingdom is a great country with the economic might of the entire Commonwealth behind it. Once it will be able to come out of the EU's shell it will soon florish, thanks to all that amazing trade deals the new PM will setup in no-time, since everbody will be in awe once they visit them. Especially their fellow ally, the US, is probably desperate to make a fair trade deal with them, since they struggle so much with China.

Yeah, things are looking great, indeed!


But seriously. Those Torry idiots probably like the smell of their own farts. They confuse their slogan "football's coming home!" with an actuall plan.