Once Upon a Time in Hollywood |OT| Fictional Glorious Basterds Unchained (Open Spoilers)

Naijaboy

The Fallen
Mar 13, 2018
3,791


Welcome to the spoilers thread for a once Upon a Time in Hollywood, the 9th film of Quentino Tarantino's career and at least the 4th film to use that moniker in a title.

What is it about?
It is more of a slice of life than anything, but it mainly followers the dwindling careers of an actor and his long-time stunt double in 1969 Hollywood.

But what is it really about?
Behind the fluff is a retelling of an infamous moment of Hollywood where members of the Charles Manson cult murdered several people, among which was Sharon Tate, the leading woman in this film.

Main Cast:
Leonardo DiCaprio as Rick Dalton
Brad Pitt as Cliffe Booth
Margot Robbie as Sharon Tate herself
Emile Hirsch as Jay Sebring in real life
Margaret Qualley as Pussycat, loosely based on Kathryn Lutesinger
Timothy Olyphant as James Stacy:
Julia Butters as Trudi Fraser
Mike Moh as Bruce Lee
Austin Butler as Charles "Tex" Watson, Madisen Beaty as Patricia Krenwinkel, Maya Hawke as Linda Kasabian and Mikey Madison as Susan "Sadie" Atkins all involved in the murders
Dakota Fanning as Lynette "Squeaky" Fromme:
Bruce Dern as George Spahn:
Luke Perry as Wayne Maunder
Damian Lewis as Steve McQueen
Al Pacino as Marvin Schwarz
Brenda Vaccaro as Mary Alice Schwarz
Kurt Russell as Randy/ the film narrator
Zoë Bell as Janet
Lorenza Izzo as Francesca Cappucci
And Rafal Zawierucha as Roman Polanski


Trailers:


 

OG YOLOwen

Member
Mar 24, 2019
402
The scene where Cliff is driving while the colors of the signs match the mood of the song was one of my favorite scenes I've seen in the past few years.

Really wanna go see this one again. I had to show up 15 minutes late so I missed the beginning
 

NKnight7

Member
Oct 25, 2017
9,998
That whole final sequence was amazing to watch, and made me go "yep, this is a Quentin movie."

I loved the movie, not my favorite movie from him but I really enjoyed it.
 

Ryuelli

Member
Oct 26, 2017
5,413
My favorite 2 scenes were Bruce Lee and the Ending.

The scene at the ranch made me want a full on Tarantino-directed horror movie.
 

Stat

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,663
Loved it despite a couple talking my ear off the entire night (FFS, just STFU during a movie).

I do want to see it again. Maybe without people chatting my ear off.
 
Oct 27, 2017
16,587
I like how it sort of demystified the tough guy attitude behind the 50s/60s white male stars. Rick was super insecure and fairly self conscious about his acting, but really only vented to Cliff despite the persona he normally put on. Not to mention his fanboying for Polanski.

Also, I was so worried him and Cliff would have a schism and falling out by the end. I think it was when we first saw Cliff's place was just a shoddy trailer and I thought there was some secret animosity between him and Rick, but no, they were generally best friends and generally cared for each other. He was the only person he was okay venting to, he stuck up for him in trying to get him the stuntman job (which he fucked up fighting Bruce Lee) and he hung out with him when they go back from Rome
 

Border

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Oct 25, 2017
10,337
I thought the ending was pretty silly, but definitely the most memorable part of the movie. Not sure why that girl went around screaming and flailing for what seemed like several minutes.

It seemed kinda obvious that Tate was not going to get murdered, once it's clear that the movie is veering away from established history. I didn't want to see a grisly homicide, but at the same time I don't feel like giving Tarantino big kudos for doing the same thing he already did at the end of Inglorious Basterds.
 

Baconmonk

Avenger
Oct 26, 2017
5,301
From the moment Cliff lit that laced cigarette, I knew chaos was about to descend upon the theater. I had no idea how glorious it would be.

Excellent film, I'll be seeing it again this week to catch it on 35mm again. Looks great on film, especially the older shots. The Great Escape bit especially looked damn near perfect.
 

Venatio

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,143
So what's with this Bruce Lee controversy I keep hearing about? That sequence with him and Cliff was a fantasy, right? That's how I saw it.
 

jakoo

Member
Oct 27, 2017
1,084
One small detail I liked in this movie were the scenes where Cliff was feeding his dog and you got a sense of how dense and full those cans of dog food were. That paid dividends in the final scene
 

Einchy

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Oct 25, 2017
29,678
I loved the scene where they walked that FBI show and commented on what was on screen. I thought it was a cool shot when Leo looked through the broken glass and then Cliff commented on it being a cool shot, it cracked me up.
 

vulva

Member
Oct 25, 2017
894
Gonna repost this from the other thread since people who've already seen the movie might find it cool

Popped by Westwood Village the other day, thought you guys might find this fun


 

Books

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Feb 4, 2019
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Was worried QT was going to play the Tate/Sebring murder climax straight and instead he went left field and went alternate history. The former would have been a giant ugh, the latter being far more creative and brought energy back into the movie that was starting to feel weighed down by that point.

So what's with this Bruce Lee controversy I keep hearing about? That sequence with him and Cliff was a fantasy, right? That's how I saw it.
It turned Bruce into a cartoon punchline.
 

Salty Catfish

Avenger
Oct 25, 2017
1,539
Florida
From the moment Cliff lit that laced cigarette, I knew chaos was about to descend upon the theater. I had no idea how glorious it would be.

Excellent film, I'll be seeing it again this week to catch it on 35mm again. Looks great on film, especially the older shots. The Great Escape bit especially looked damn near perfect.
The Great Escape scene was a bit of a mindfuck with how good it looked. Leo's charisma is timeless.
 

Aaron D.

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Oct 25, 2017
4,791
You know it's a great movie when Brad Pitt and his dog kills the Manson family while on acid.
 

thediamondage

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Oct 25, 2017
4,802
Parts of me really loved the movie, the sort of fetishization of old school cool Hollywood and the idea of "what if the Manson cult was stopped and Sharon Tate lived a happy life" but another part of me thinks the movie is vastly self indulgent, worships a period of Hollywood that was probably really fucked up for most of the people involved, and all the feet stuff was gross. I wasn't exactly bored in the first 100 minutes of the movie but I dunno if I'd really want to rewatch it all, especially some of the longer western stuff.

There are a lot of crazy stories that are part of the tapestry of the movie. Like Cliff being based off Hal Needham, who was Burt Reynolds stunt guy for a long time and ended up directing Smokey and the Bandit and more. Or the parallels between Cliff's wife story and how Robert Wagner is suspected of murdering his wife Natalie Wood in the same way (on a boat, she "drowned", no real witnesses) and Hollywood essentially covering it up.

Another crazy one were the stars of that western TV show Rick was working on, Lancers. One of the co-stars, I forget if its the one played by Timothy Olyphant or Luke Perry, ended up becoming a paraplegic when he was in a motorcycle accident where his girlfriend died. But even MORE crazy, he was caught with child porn and molesting a kid decades later! Jesus!

Just a ton of weird ass "true hollywood stories" to rival any Chappelle skit like that woven into the DNA of the movie. Burt Reynolds was originally going to play the old guy blind stuck in the Spahn Ranch house, but he died during production and Bruce Dern stepped in.

The Manson girl who drove off in the car in the end is the daughter of Uma Thurman and Ethan Hawk and is a star of Stranger Things season 3 (Scoops girl).
 

TheIlliterati

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Oct 28, 2017
4,372
So I stated this in the other thread and no one else commented, but stuntman Randy(Russell) and his wife(played by Zoe Bell) are at the very least obvious homages to Deathproof. However, I like my personal theory that Deathproof is actually a passion project in this universe starring Randy and his wife in the two best roles, also conveniently highlighting their amazing stunt work.
 

Salty Catfish

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Oct 25, 2017
1,539
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So what's with this Bruce Lee controversy I keep hearing about? That sequence with him and Cliff was a fantasy, right? That's how I saw it.
I've seen some folks suggest that Cliff was an unreliable narrator for that bit. When we see Bruce Lee training with Sharon Tate and Jay Sebring later, he seems way more chill than the cocky asshole he came across ass in Cliff's recollection.
 

AegonSnake

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Oct 25, 2017
7,093
Good final 10 minutes. Maybe 15. Whenever the robbery starts. Its all over before you know it.

the rest of the movie was a meandering mess with one exception being the ranch scene. tarantino losing it.
 

thediamondage

Member
Oct 25, 2017
4,802
So what's with this Bruce Lee controversy I keep hearing about? That sequence with him and Cliff was a fantasy, right? That's how I saw it.
Its not a fantasy, its a flashback. The TV show Bruce Lee was working on was Green Hornet, filmed in 1965-1967. The show Rick takes Cliff to (where he ultimately cannot work) is a western in 1969. The Bruce Lee scene was the REASON why Kurt Russell won't work with Cliff but more importantly also why his wife hates him, Cliff fucked up her car by throwing Bruce into it.

1967: Rick and Cliff are going to work on Green Hornet TV show, Cliff is just chilling in the rest area with the crew/Bruce in his tux. He makes fun of Bruce and fights him, they go 1-1 but wreck a car door.
1969: Rick plays the baddie on Lancer episode 1, wants Cliff to be involved but Kurt Russell says no way because of the events of 1967 so Rick instead tells Cliff to go fix his TV antenna.

We see the events of 1967 as a flashback. It is a bit confusing because it seems like Kurt Russell finally ok's Cliff working but that may be some intermix of 1967 or something where Kurt does relent on Green Hornet. At least thats my interpretation of the events, but probably requires a second viewing of that specific scene to map out the times, costumes, etc to see how it all lines up.
 
Last edited:

Venatio

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Oct 25, 2017
1,143
Its not a fantasy, its a flashback. The TV show Bruce Lee was working on was Green Hornet, filmed in 1965-1967. The show Rick takes Cliff to (where he ultimately cannot work) is a western in 1969. The Bruce Lee scene was the REASON why Kurt Russell won't work with Cliff but more importantly also why his wife hates him, Cliff fucked up her car by throwing Bruce into it.

1967: Rick and Cliff are going to work on Green Hornet TV show, Cliff is just chilling in the rest area with the crew/Bruce in his tux. He makes fun of Bruce and fights him, they go 1-1 but wreck a car door.
1969: Rick plays the baddie on Lancer episode 1, wants Cliff to be involved but Kurt Russell says no way because of the events of 1967 so Rick instead tells Cliff to go fix his TV antenna.

We see the events of 1967 as a flashback.
Oh ok, so it's a flashback, but it's also told by an unreliable narrator? Like take the way the side of the car crumpled when Bruce Lee was thrown into it....that's just not possible. So maybe Cliff was exaggerating certain elements, like Lee being an asshole, and that he kinda kicked his ass?
 

Bronx-Man

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Oct 25, 2017
14,963
This was a great film about what it means to accept when your day in the sun is over and moving past old standards of toxic masculinity. I’m still not sure if it’s my favorite Tarantino but it’s close to the top.
 

Salty Catfish

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Oct 25, 2017
1,539
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Oh ok, so it's a flashback, but it's also told by an unreliable narrator? Like take the way the side of the car crumpled when Bruce Lee was thrown into it....that's just not possible. So maybe Cliff was exaggerating certain elements, like Lee being an asshole, and that he kinda kicked his ass?
This was my interpretation, yeah. Some random stuntman kicking Bruce Lee's ass on the set of The Green Hornet seems like a tall tale straight out of 60s Hollywood.
 

jakoo

Member
Oct 27, 2017
1,084
It turned Bruce into a cartoon punchline.
Oh ok, so it's a flashback, but it's also told by an unreliable narrator? Like take the way the side of the car crumpled when Bruce Lee was thrown into it....that's just not possible. So maybe Cliff was exaggerating certain elements, like Lee being an asshole, and that he kinda kicked his ass?
This was my interpretation, yeah. Some random stuntman kicking Bruce Lee's ass on the set of The Green Hornet seems like a tall tale straight out of 60s Hollywood.
I saw it in a different way: it established that Cliff is a tough enough dude to rival Bruce Lee in hand to hand combat. The movie doesn't really establish that at any other point, so it makes Cliff's performance in the final scene seem more plausible.
 
Oct 27, 2017
16,587
I saw it in a different way: it established that Cliff is a tough enough dude to rival Bruce Lee in hand to hand combat. The movie doesn't really establish that at any other point, so it makes Cliff's performance in the final scene seem more plausible.
It does show him casually leaping onto Rick's roof when he was checking the antenna
 

Garlador

Member
Oct 30, 2017
8,826
So what's with this Bruce Lee controversy I keep hearing about? That sequence with him and Cliff was a fantasy, right? That's how I saw it.
"I understand they want to make the Brad Pitt character this super bad-ass who could beat up Bruce Lee," Lee told TheWrap. "But they didn’t need to treat him in the way that white Hollywood did when he was alive."
"It was really uncomfortable to sit in the theater and listen to people laugh at my father," Lee added. "He’s the one with all the puffery and he’s the one challenging Brad Pitt. Which is not how he was."
It wasn't a very respectful portrayal....
 

Chixdiggit

Member
Oct 31, 2017
914
Its not a fantasy, its a flashback. The TV show Bruce Lee was working on was Green Hornet, filmed in 1965-1967. The show Rick takes Cliff to (where he ultimately cannot work) is a western in 1969. The Bruce Lee scene was the REASON why Kurt Russell won't work with Cliff but more importantly also why his wife hates him, Cliff fucked up her car by throwing Bruce into it.

1967: Rick and Cliff are going to work on Green Hornet TV show, Cliff is just chilling in the rest area with the crew/Bruce in his tux. He makes fun of Bruce and fights him, they go 1-1 but wreck a car door.
1969: Rick plays the baddie on Lancer episode 1, wants Cliff to be involved but Kurt Russell says no way because of the events of 1967 so Rick instead tells Cliff to go fix his TV antenna.

We see the events of 1967 as a flashback. It is a bit confusing because it seems like Kurt Russell finally ok's Cliff working but that may be some intermix of 1967 or something where Kurt does relent on Green Hornet. At least thats my interpretation of the events, but probably requires a second viewing of that specific scene to map out the times, costumes, etc to see how it all lines up.
Good take! Makes a lot of sense.
 

jakoo

Member
Oct 27, 2017
1,084
It does show him casually leaping onto Rick's roof when he was checking the antenna
Sure but parkour skills to me don't really translate into the beating he put on everyone in the final sequence, haha. The only time Cliff really fought was on the Ranch, and it's not like that hippie dude that knived the car put up much of a fight.

But yeah a lot of those little details, including how well trained his dog was and the fact he probably killed his wife, made that final scene more plausible where even on acid he still fucked everyone up.
 

UltraMagnus

Member
Oct 27, 2017
9,265
The Bruce Lee scene did kinda rub me the wrong way as well. I understand from a narrative POV the whole point of the scene is to establish for the audience that Brad Pitt's character would be capable of kicking some serious ass and it's on paper a pretty neat idea.

That said, the cartoony, over the top hooting/hollering that Bruce does during the fight came off as really silly, that stuff was for movies but Bruce Lee didn't fight like that. And the pompous arrogance was a bit much.

The little aside where he hears Pitt's character may be a wife killer was kind of funny though.
 

wenis

Member
Oct 25, 2017
9,227
It wasn't a very respectful portrayal....
good, im glad I wasn't the only one. I was obsessed with bruce as a kid so i feel like i have some gauge of the mans temperment based off people who were in his life, so the way he was portrayed in the movie, unreliable narrator or not, felt wrong.

he came off as a cartoon character and bruce was anything but that. the unreliable narrator thing didn't even cross my mind, i just thought it was a flashback.
 

Blader

Member
Oct 27, 2017
13,022
Cliff ramming the one girl's face into the phone receiver...Jesus. I saw that and was like, has no else ever thought of that before?! What an idea!

Its not a fantasy, its a flashback. The TV show Bruce Lee was working on was Green Hornet, filmed in 1965-1967. The show Rick takes Cliff to (where he ultimately cannot work) is a western in 1969. The Bruce Lee scene was the REASON why Kurt Russell won't work with Cliff but more importantly also why his wife hates him, Cliff fucked up her car by throwing Bruce into it.

1967: Rick and Cliff are going to work on Green Hornet TV show, Cliff is just chilling in the rest area with the crew/Bruce in his tux. He makes fun of Bruce and fights him, they go 1-1 but wreck a car door.
1969: Rick plays the baddie on Lancer episode 1, wants Cliff to be involved but Kurt Russell says no way because of the events of 1967 so Rick instead tells Cliff to go fix his TV antenna.

We see the events of 1967 as a flashback. It is a bit confusing because it seems like Kurt Russell finally ok's Cliff working but that may be some intermix of 1967 or something where Kurt does relent on Green Hornet. At least thats my interpretation of the events, but probably requires a second viewing of that specific scene to map out the times, costumes, etc to see how it all lines up.
Wait what? I think the whole thing was just imagined. Cliff is just calling Lee "Kato" to egg him on, not because they're actually on the set of Green Hornet. Zoe Bell's character hates Cliff because she thinks he killed his wife; damaging her car just digs him in even further right there, not that it's the origin story of her hatred for him.
 

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I saw it in a different way: it established that Cliff is a tough enough dude to rival Bruce Lee in hand to hand combat. The movie doesn't really establish that at any other point, so it makes Cliff's performance in the final scene seem more plausible.
I think the scene where he takes his shirt off to reveal his tattoos show he’s either ex-military or an ex-criminal, especially when you consider that it takes place in 1969 and tattoos were not common at all except in those two instances. Either way his tattoos show he’s not someone you would really want to mess with.
 

UltraMagnus

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Oct 27, 2017
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I could be wrong on this but I don't think Bruce Lee ever touted that he would destroy Ali (Cassius Clay) either.


Another time Yeung, aka (Bolo) went to see Bruce at Golden Harvest Studios. Bruce was screening a Cassius Clay (Muhammad Ali) documentary. Ali was world heavyweight champion at the time and Bruce saw him as the greatest fighter of them all. The documentary showed Ali in several of his fights. Bruce set up a wide full-length mirror to reflect Ali’s image from the screen. Bruce was looking into the mirror, moving along with Ali.

Bruce’s right hand followed Ali’s right hand, Ali’s left foot followed Bruce’s left foot. Bruce was fighting in Ali’s shoes. “Everybody says I must fight Ali some day.” Bruce said, “I’m studying every move he makes. I’m getting to know how he thinks and moves.” Bruce knew he could never win a fight against Ali “Look at my hand,” he said. “That’s a little Chinese hand. He’d kill me.



Yeah I get it's a fictionalized "once upon a time" version of Hollywood, but I think that scene could've been handled in a more respectful way.
 

bliggup

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Nov 11, 2018
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This movie is top 3 QT for me, I want to see it again ASAP.

do we really think anyone who has just smoked acid is gonna be able to handle a killing a bunch of would-be-killers? i've done some acid in my time and I just don't know about it lmao
 

Distantmantra

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Oct 26, 2017
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My interpretation of that scene with Bruce Lee is that Cliff made it all up in his mind to justify why he didn't get the stuntman gig that day, when the real reason was him killing his wife.

Also, did anyone save the "fake ending" that was on Wikipedia before the movie came out? It was gone by the time I saw the movie over the weekend.
 

Salty Catfish

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Oct 25, 2017
1,539
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I could be wrong on this but I don't think Bruce Lee ever touted that he would destroy Ali (Cassius Clay) either.


Another time Yeung, aka (Bolo) went to see Bruce at Golden Harvest Studios. Bruce was screening a Cassius Clay (Muhammad Ali) documentary. Ali was world heavyweight champion at the time and Bruce saw him as the greatest fighter of them all. The documentary showed Ali in several of his fights. Bruce set up a wide full-length mirror to reflect Ali’s image from the screen. Bruce was looking into the mirror, moving along with Ali.

Bruce’s right hand followed Ali’s right hand, Ali’s left foot followed Bruce’s left foot. Bruce was fighting in Ali’s shoes. “Everybody says I must fight Ali some day.” Bruce said, “I’m studying every move he makes. I’m getting to know how he thinks and moves.” Bruce knew he could never win a fight against Ali “Look at my hand,” he said. “That’s a little Chinese hand. He’d kill me.



Yeah I get it's a fictionalized "once upon a time" version of Hollywood, but I think that scene could've been handled in a more respectful way.
Over his career Tarantino has shown high levels of reverence both for Lee and Asian action cinema as a whole, which is why I think that the cartoonishness was via Cliff's telling of the story. When we see Lee later in the present day he seems way friendlier.
My interpretation of that scene with Bruce Lee is that Cliff made it all up in his mind to justify why he didn't get the stuntman gig that day, when the real reason was him killing his wife.

Also, did anyone save the "fake ending" that was on Wikipedia before the movie came out? It was gone by the time I saw the movie over the weekend.
Here you go:
In 1969 Los Angeles, actor Rick Dalton, the former star of the Western television series Bounty Law, finds his career faltering due to ongoing alcoholism issues. Dalton dwindles into a drawling functional binge alongside Cliff Booth, his best friend and stunt double, lamenting that his career is over. By contrast, Booth, a Vietnam War veteran who lives in a derelict trailer next to a drive-in in Van Nuys, seems happy and satisfied. Booth is rumored to have murdered his wife and gotten away with it.

Booth participates in a fists-meets-martial-arts duel on the set of The Green Hornet with Bruce Lee and wins. Later, Dalton, playing a black-hatted villain on a new series called Lancer, gets into a philosophical chat about acting with his 8-year-old costar, a budding feminist and method actress.

Meanwhile, Sharon Tate and her husband, Roman Polanski, have rented their new home next to Dalton's at 10050 Cielo Drive. At a party at the Playboy Mansion, fellow actor Steve McQueen fills in Dalton on the backstory of Tate, Polanski, and their friend Jay Sebring, a hairdresser who is in love with Tate and, according to McQueen, is hanging around to bide his time and wait for Polanski to sabotage his marriage.

After his performance in Lancer receives positive reviews, casting agent Marvin Schwarzs offers Dalton the opportunity to shoot a Spaghetti Western in Rome. The prospect fills Dalton with despair; he thinks Spaghetti Westerns are the bottom rung of the entertainment totem pole. Dalton takes Booth to the six month shoot in Rome, making several films while eventually marrying an Italian crew member, Francesca Cappucci.

Back in Los Angeles, while escorting a flirtatious young woman named Pussycat to the Spahn Movie Ranch, Booth learns she is a member of the Manson Family led by cult leader Charles Manson. Suspiciously, Booth and Dalton meet up at the ranch and discover a murder plot, as the Manson Family have taken hostages, having kidnapped Tate, Sebring, Abigail Folger, Wojciech Frykowski and others from Rick's house, with the intent to brutally murder them for the agenda of their cult. Bruce Lee arrives onto the scene unannounced, ready to fight, saying he had been observing the family for days and suspected them of possible violence. Tate is freed, and begins dispatching members of the Manson family herself in a brutal fashion, with moves she learned from Lee in private lessons. Together, Dalton, Booth, Tate and Lee brutally defeat the Family in a shoot-out/kung-fu showdown. Manson arrives to briefly check in on the family, stunned that his murder plot was thwarted, but is abruptly killed by Booth before he has a chance to react to the change of events. Tate and the others are saved, but Booth dies from fatal injuries sustained in the fight. Despite his career having not amounted to his ambition, Dalton acknowledges that it is the end of the 1960s, and the Hollywood spirit will live on.
 

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This movie is top 3 QT for me, I want to see it again ASAP.

do we really think anyone who has just smoked acid is gonna be able to handle a killing a bunch of would-be-killers? i've done some acid in my time and I just don't know about it lmao
Was definitely goofy. I just took it as the signal that the climax of the movie was happening RIGHT NOW.
 
Oct 27, 2017
16,587
Over his career Tarantino has shown high levels of reverence both for Lee and Asian action cinema as a whole, which is why I think that the cartoonishness was via Cliff's telling of the story. When we see Lee later in the present day he seems way friendlier.
Yeah, Kill Bill was basically a love letter to Hong Kong action movies and The Bride's outfit was clearly based on Bruce Lee's in Game of Death. I don't think he'd suddenly shit on him
 

UltraMagnus

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Oct 27, 2017
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I think the Bruce Lee scene would work better if Brad Pitt's character was just working as a stunt double and things got a little heated between him and Bruce during a fight scene.
 

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Yeah, Kill Bill was basically a love letter to Hong Kong action movies and The Bride's outfit was clearly based on Bruce Lee's in Game of Death. You don't think he'd suddenly shit on him
Also, if it wasn’t obvious from Sharron Tate not dying, the film is not a historical portrayal. He’s not trying to portray Bruce Lee are real life Bruce Lee. It’s “Bruce Lee”.
 

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Yeah, Kill Bill was basically a love letter to Hong Kong action movies and The Bride's outfit was clearly based on Bruce Lee's in Game of Death. I don't think he'd suddenly shit on him
It's just that every historical character gets a straight portrayal except Bruce. Did he mean to shit on Bruce? Most likely not, but it still doesn't come across well.
 

bye

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Also, if it wasn’t obvious from Sharron Tate not dying, the film is not a historical portrayal. He’s not trying to portray Bruce Lee are real life Bruce Lee. It’s “Bruce Lee”.
but the film relies entirely upon your outside knowledge of what happens to Tate (reality) in order to build tension and make the end of the film work. even her portrayal is well-done and very respectful, despite not making her an actual developed character. probably why doing Bruce the way they did is so jarring, it served no point story wise (unlike changing Tate's demise) and felt odd in an otherwise very on-point portrayal of Hollywood. I don't think the film was as fairytale-ish as people want to think it is.