OT : Climate Change fight

ilium

Member
Oct 25, 2017
462
Vienna
Okay, lol. If someone was trying to get a short doc series of the ground of short tales about people already living through notable effects of global warming. What would be some interesting topics that are off the beaten track?

Like living in a city with extreme air pollution like Beijing with asthma (not necessarily climate change). Living in an area that's suddenly prone to forest fires. The tale of a storm chaser chasing ever more powerful storms. etc.

Things like that.

"THE ANTHROPOLOGIST explores climate change like no other film before. The fate of the planet is considered from the perspective of American teenager Katie Crate. Over the course of five years, she travels alongside her mother Susie, an anthropologist studying the impact of climate change on indigenous communities. Their journey parallels that of renowned anthropologist Margaret Mead, who for decades sought to understand how global change affects remote cultures."
 

Zeouter

Member
Oct 27, 2017
281
Ireland
I was better about eating less meat, slowly going veggie and moving to alternative milk options like soy & almond.

Then I moved in with my girlfriend and she became very resistant to those things :-(

It's a compromise, we eat "healthier" than she did, but less than I did?

I dunno, I just liked the track I was on before when it came to more planet friendly eating.
 

Bramblebutt

Member
Jan 11, 2018
1,311
Some of the advice needs some nuance. Only go electric if the electricity is generated from sustainable sources. There is an all electric craze going on in the Netherlands while 7% of our electricity is from renewable sources.
It's worth keeping in mind, for sure. However, looking up emissions per kwh for the Netherlands electric grid (around 400gCO2) and the km/kwh efficiency of modern EVs (around 5.5), EVs do tend to win out over even the most efficient gas or deisel powered cars, having around 73g/km based on the figures above vs 80+ for supermini fuel economy specialists like the Suzuki Celerio or the Renault Clio. Not sure how that reflects on plug-in hybrids, though, since I'm not sure about the efficiency of their combustion engines since those stats weren't easy to find.

So while it's not carbon free, it's still marginally better than the gas powered alternative. Now if you were living in West Virginia or North Dakota, that'd be a different story, you probably would be better off going high efficiency gas because of the disturbingly high CO2/kwh stats (800g+? Christ).
 

Kukulcan

Avenger
Nov 2, 2017
2,030
Germany
Some of the advice needs some nuance. Only go electric if the electricity is generated from sustainable sources. There is an all electric craze going on in the Netherlands while 7% of our electricity is from renewable sources.
Actually I believe you should take the national or even global energy mix as a basis. Renewable energy used for your electric car will result in more energy produced somewhere else that comes from coal or whatever.

That is even true for Norway. Electricity used for electric cars there couldn’t be exported to Germany where we reduce nuclear energy in favor of coal at least until renewable energy can replace nuclear.

Electric cars are not the solution short term, more energy efficient cars and using them less often is.
 
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Pomerlaw

Pomerlaw

Member
Feb 25, 2018
2,452
New catalyst opens door to CO2 capture in conversion of coal to liquid fuels
Summary:
World energy consumption projections expect coal to stay one of the world's main energy sources in the coming decades, and a growing share of it will be used in CTL, the conversion of coal to liquid fuels. Researchers have developed iron-based catalysts that substantially reduce operating costs and open the door to capturing the large amounts of CO2 that are generated by CTL.


https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/10/181012143024.htm
 

Mr. Shakedown

User Requested Ban
Banned
Oct 27, 2017
522
New catalyst opens door to CO2 capture in conversion of coal to liquid fuels
Summary:
World energy consumption projections expect coal to stay one of the world's main energy sources in the coming decades, and a growing share of it will be used in CTL, the conversion of coal to liquid fuels. Researchers have developed iron-based catalysts that substantially reduce operating costs and open the door to capturing the large amounts of CO2 that are generated by CTL.


https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/10/181012143024.htm
This sounds like a pretty big deal that can and probably will lead to more breakthroughs in the future. Anything at all that can be done to reduce the emissions caused by coal is a good thing because we're not going to go 100% off coal for at least another 20-30 years, and that's being optimistic. So the next best thing is going to be figuring out ways to filter out and eliminate if possible any CO2 from the emissions as they're generated.

Right now this catalyst is specifically for use in the coal-to-liquid conversion process, but like most scientific breakthroughs there are takeaways from this research that can and most likely will be tested for use in other solutions. Namely the properties of this catalyst - it acts as a carbon sink, and when it is figured out how to apply it in different situations outside of CTL we'll have a major breakthrough on our hands.
 
Nov 13, 2017
4,451
Dumb question here.

Does planting more trees do anything to combat climate change and rising CO2 levels? Or is the only way to reduce our emissions entirely?
 

Mr. Shakedown

User Requested Ban
Banned
Oct 27, 2017
522
Dumb question here.

Does planting more trees do anything to combat climate change and rising CO2 levels? Or is the only way to reduce our emissions entirely?
Plants and trees are carbon sinks, they take in CO2 and output Oxygen. So in theory yes, they will reduce CO2 levels. The problem is, however, due to the sheer overwhelming amount of CO2 we've pumped into the atmosphere already and compounded with the amount we put in year over year, they don't do enough.

Massive scale reforestation efforts can make a difference, but they can't be the only solution. Ideally what should and will happen is a combination of efforts:

  • Carbon reduction is a must - renewables and nuclear energy are the best way to see a wide-scale drop, as energy generation contributes to roughly 72% of global emissions. Regulations here will help, but the real driver of clean energy is going to be cost. Right now I signed up for a clean electricity generation provider and there was a roughly 2% increase in cost for doing so. This would have been a 75% or greater bump a decade ago, and it's only getting cheaper. Green energy adoption isn't a matter of if, but when.
  • Reforestation and other natural carbon sinks. Other plans I've seen floated around are algae ponds, as algae eats carbon! There is plenty of open land that we can use for these endeavors, however these plans are usually at odds with corporate interest (they'd rather put a factory, farm, residential or commercial real estate, etc.) or NIMBYs depending on where we're talking about. This is going to need strict regulation.
  • Carbon stripping tech. While this technology exists now and is very promising, it's inefficient and expensive to utilize. It has gotten cheaper, but right now optimistically it will cost over $3 trillion per year to remove carbon in the capacity we'd need it to function at. We've been putting carbon into the atmosphere for over 200 years, and there are GIGATONS of it up there, so this is a very costly endeavor. However, this cost will only go down over the decades, and especially over centuries as the technology gets more advanced. It isn't far-fetched at all to think that by 2100-2150 it will be much more economical to run wide-scale stripping operations and begin a possible reverse-course.
  • Geoengineering, which as the name would suggest is literally engineering the earth and the climate itself. We've arguably been - at first inadvertently - geoengineering our climate for 200 years by pumping all of the carbon out there and warming it up. The idea behind this is that we can implement other counter measures to prevent more warming in the future. There are techniques we know are effective now such as stratospheric aerosol injection, where we'd be using balloons or some other delivery method to inject sulfate gasses into the stratosphere to reduce the amount of solar radiation that makes it through, and counters any warming. It is important to note that climate scientists are cautiously optimistic about this because while in theory and in limited testing it was proven effective, there's no way to know without implementing it what kind of impact it would have when applied to the entire planet. For that reason, geoengineering efforts are considered as a last-ditch effort to prevent a complete apocalypse scenario from occurring. Smaller scale geoengineering such as concentrating it to strictly the arctic region however, could be a safeguard from extreme sea-level rise.
I know that was a wall of text, but the more people know about this stuff the better! There is no be-all, end-all panacea that will pull us out of this mess. We're going to need a combination of the above efforts to get the best possible outcome for the planet, and for our species.
 
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MrSaturn99

Member
Oct 25, 2017
4,995
I live in a giant bucket.
For my next step in carbon footprints, I've been looking into streaming vs. DVDs, as well as the costs of delivery. From what I've read -- here's one study citing researchers from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and McCormick School of Engineering -- the emissions are close enough to render it a case-by-case basis. More research may be needed on my end, but I'm thinking I'll stick to DVDs for anime (iTunes seems to only host dubs), stream Crunchyroll for ones I haven't watched, and stick to downloading other stuff from iTunes.

Been also reading up on delivery vs. store purchase; so far, it seems case-by-case too, although carbon emissions from round-trips via car give the emission edge to the latter. Thankfully, I don't drive, but as I was in the market for new pizza following the Papa John's scandals, I think I'll just stick with frozen to avoid just that.

Finally, I've taken care to turn my computer off every night. Baby steps!

Waiting until it hits you right in the face will be inevitable for many, sadly. Whatever works!
 
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Pomerlaw

Pomerlaw

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Feb 25, 2018
2,452
According to some newly available comments filed with regulators, the oil giant says U.S. policy should be "consistent with the aim of the Paris Agreement." Shell "does not support" the administration's proposal to weaken federal mileage and carbon emissions rules by freezing them in 2020 rather than letting them become increasingly stringent.

  • Shell's comments push back against the EPA plan to revoke California's power to impose emissions standards that are tougher than the federal rules, calling it a "step in the wrong direction."
  • California has a special authority under the Clean Air Act to set separate tailpipe standards that roughly a dozen other states also follow.
When Shell is actually the good guy... wtf
https://www.axios.com/shell-epa-obama-climate-rules-paris-deal-4373f3c3-1f87-4791-9873-ec516a76f5a6.html
 
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Pomerlaw

Pomerlaw

Member
Feb 25, 2018
2,452
https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2018/01/renewables-will-be-equal-or-cheaper-than-fossil-fuels-by-2020-according-to-research

The cost of renewable energy sources like wind and solar continue to fall drastically, and it was only a matter of time before they were cheaper than fossil fuels. The International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA) believes that’ll happen by 2020 based on their new report. Prices could be as low as three cents per kilowatt-hour for onshore wind and solar photovoltaic projects over the next two years.
 
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Pomerlaw

Pomerlaw

Member
Feb 25, 2018
2,452
https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-45132427?fbclid=IwAR11mWvlWcHcQJTevG8dqqEoKw3_y7u09FO4POg48_twHkWHZusXOdyjr-4

Chinese researchers have taken what they say is a major step forward for the development of a new generation of solar cells.

Manufacturers have long used silicon to make solar panels because the material was the most efficient at converting sunlight into electricity.

But organic photovoltaics, made from carbon and plastic, promise a cheaper way of generating electricity.

This new study shows that organics can now be just as efficient as silicon.

In April researchers were able to reach 15% in tests. Now this new study pushes that beyond 17% with the authors saying that up to 25% is possible.

This is important because according to estimates, with a 15% efficiency and a 20 year lifetime, organic solar cells could produce electricity at a cost of less than 7 cents per kilowatt-hour.
 
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Pomerlaw

Pomerlaw

Member
Feb 25, 2018
2,452
https://www.sciencealert.com/scientists-develop-liquid-that-sucks-up-sun-s-energy?fbclid=IwAR3s3uKCdCxSpJRtxLXF4vvUZ0G0Kyz8gCZn97fAkWuiaY06OtJruH82HAQ

Scientists Develop Liquid Fuel That Can Store The Sun's Energy For Up to 18 Years

CARLY CASSELLA
6 NOV 2018
No matter how abundant or renewable, solar power has a thorn in its side. There is still no cheap and efficient long-term storage for the energy that it generates.

The solar industry has been snagged on this branch for a while, but in the past year alone, a series of four papers has ushered in an intriguing new solution.

Scientists in Sweden have developed a specialised fluid, called a solar thermal fuel, that can store energy from the sun for well over a decade.

"A solar thermal fuel is like a rechargeable battery, but instead of electricity, you put sunlight in and get heat out, triggered on demand," Jeffrey Grossman, an engineer works with these materials at MIT explained to NBC News.

The fluid is actually a molecule in liquid form that scientists from Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden have been working on improving for over a year.

This molecule is composed of carbon, hydrogen and nitrogen, and when it is hit by sunlight, it does something unusual: the bonds between its atoms are rearranged and it turns into an energised new version of itself, called an isomer.

Like prey caught in a trap, energy from the sun is thus captured between the isomer's strong chemical bonds, and it stays there even when the molecule cools down to room temperature.

When the energy is needed - say at nighttime, or during winter - the fluid is simply drawn through a catalyst that returns the molecule to its original form, releasing energy in the form of heat.

"The energy in this isomer can now be stored for up to 18 years," says one of the team, nanomaterials scientist Kasper Moth-Poulsen from Chalmers University.

"And when we come to extract the energy and use it, we get a warmth increase which is greater than we dared hope for."

A prototype of the energy system, placed on the roof of a university building, has put the new fluid to the test, and according to the researchers, the results have caught the attention of numerous investors.

(Chalmers University of Technology)

The renewable, emissions-free energy device is made up of a concave reflector with a pipe in the centre, which tracks the Sun like a sort-of satellite dish.

The system works in a circular manner. Pumping through transparent tubes, the fluid is heated up by the sunlight, turning the molecule norbornadiene into its heat-trapping isomer, quadricyclane. The fluid is then stored at room temperature with minimal energy loss.

When the energy is needed, the fluid is filtered through a special catalyst that converts the molecules back to their original form, warming the liquid by 63 degrees Celsius (113 degrees Fahrenheit).

The hope is that this warmth can be used for domestic heating systems, powering a building's water heater, dishwasher, clothes dryer and much more, before heading back to the roof once again.

The researchers have put the fluid through this cycle more than 125 times, picking up heat and dropping it off without significant damage to the molecule.

"We have made many crucial advances recently, and today we have an emissions-free energy system which works all year around," says Moth-Poulsen.

After a series of rapid developments, the researchers claim their fluid can now hold 250 watt-hours of energy per kilogram, which is double the the energy capacity of Tesla's Powerwall batteries, according to the NBC.

But there's still plenty of room for improvement. With the right manipulations, the researchers think they can get even more heat out of this system, at least 110 degrees Celsius (230 degrees Fahrenheit) more.


"There is a lot left to do. We have just got the system to work. Now we need to ensure everything is optimally designed," says Moth-Poulsen.

If all goes as planned, Moth-Poulsen thinks the technology could be available for commercial use within 10 years.

The most recent study in the series has been published in Energy & Environmental Science.
 
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Pomerlaw

Pomerlaw

Member
Feb 25, 2018
2,452
Restoring the United States' lands and coastal wetlands could have a much bigger role in reducing global warming than previously thought, according to the most comprehensive national assessment to date of how greenhouse gas emissions can be reduced and stored in forests, farmland, grasslands, and wetlands.

The peer-reviewed study in Science Advances from The Nature Conservancy and 21 institutional partners found that nature's contribution could equal 21% of the nation's current net annual emissions, by adjusting 21 natural management practices to increase carbon storage and avoid greenhouse emissions. The study is the first to include the climate benefits of coastal wetlands and grasslands in a comprehensive mix along with forests and agriculture.
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/11/181114160045.htm
 
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Pomerlaw

Pomerlaw

Member
Feb 25, 2018
2,452
Quebec's youth are suing the Government of Canada for inaction on climate change
On November 26 2018, ENvironnement JEUnesse, represented pro bono by the firm Trudel Johnston & Lespérance, applied to bring a class action against the Canadian government before the Superior Court of Québec today on behalf of Quebeckers aged 35 and under.

ENvironnement JEUnesse alleges that the Canadian government is infringing on a generation’s fundamental rights because its greenhouse gas reduction target is not ambitious enough to avoid dangerous climate change and because it does not even have a plan that would allow it to reach this already inadequate target.

If the government continues in this direction, people under 35 will suffer the severe consequences of climate change, depriving them of their right their right to life and security of the person, to their right to equality, and to their right to an environment in which biodiversity is preserved.

The first step in judicial proceedings that may take several years
To obtain leave from the Court to bring these judicial proceedings, ENvironnement JEUnesse must first demonstrate to the Superior Court of Québec that it has an arguable case, this means that at first glance, the alleged facts, if they are proven in a trial on merits, appear to justify the conclusions sought, i.e. that the insufficient target and actions to combat climate change violate several fundamental rights.

A global movement
Several similar proceedings have been started around the world, notably in the Netherlands, where the government was forced to adopt a concrete plan to reach its climate target. The Dutch government is legally bound to reduce its greenhouse gas emissions by at least 25% by 2020 compared to 1990 levels. Similar legal actions are ongoing in the United States, Belgium, Norway, Ireland, New Zealand, Switzerland, Colombia and the United Kingdom.

https://enjeu.qc.ca/justice-eng/


 
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Pomerlaw

Pomerlaw

Member
Feb 25, 2018
2,452
Scientists achieve direct electrocatalytic reduction of carbon dioxide, raising hopes for smart carbon capture
Date:
November 28, 2018
Source:
Tokyo Institute of Technology
Summary:
Chemists propose an innovative way to achieve carbon capture using a rhenium-based electrocatalytic system that is capable of reducing low-concentration carbon dioxide (even 1 percent) with high selectivity and durability, which is a new potential technology to enable direct utilization of carbon dioxide in exhaust gases from heavy industries
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/11/181128082744.htm


'Electrogeochemistry' captures carbon, produces fuel, offsets ocean acidification
Date:
June 25, 2018
Source:
University of California - Santa Cruz
Summary:
Limiting global warming to 2 degrees Celsius will require not only reducing emissions of carbon dioxide, but also active removal of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. This has prompted heightened interest in 'negative emissions technologies.' A new study evaluates the potential for recently described methods that capture carbon dioxide from the atmosphere through an 'electrogeochemical' process that also generates hydrogen gas for use as fuel and creates by-products that can help counteract ocean acidification.
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/06/180625192825.htm
 
Oct 30, 2017
1,210
As much as I hope these kinds of new technologies can help us, there's generally a pretty long lag time between this kind of prototyping and real, scalable technology. We have seen a million headlines on battery technology, for instance, and very few that actually made it into real-world applications.

I know this is the hopeful climate change thread, but I don't want people to place too much faith on any of this as of yet. Just gonna break your heart.
 

Tetrinski

Member
May 17, 2018
2,329
As much as I hope these kinds of new technologies can help us, there's generally a pretty long lag time between this kind of prototyping and real, scalable technology. We have seen a million headlines on battery technology, for instance, and very few that actually made it into real-world applications.

I know this is the hopeful climate change thread, but I don't want people to place too much faith on any of this as of yet. Just gonna break your heart.
My thoughts exactly, sadly.
 
Oct 27, 2017
1,984
Seems Trump isn’t the only president capable of making dumb statements in relation to climate change this week.


GOP are a lost cause on climate change, so hearing any of them saying something dumb is just whatever to me at this point, but Obama fucking bragging about turning the US into the largest oil producer is just despicable.
 

El D

Member
Sep 20, 2018
1,488
Seems Trump isn’t the only president capable of making dumb statements in relation to climate change this week.


GOP are a lost cause on climate change, so hearing any of them saying something dumb is just whatever to me at this point, but Obama fucking bragging about turning the US into the largest oil producer is just despicable.
Also thank him for futzing around and not working with his Democratic majorities in each house to sign significant climate reform into law. Implementing his policy at an executive bureaucratic level just set it up to be hand-waved away by the Cheeto like so many other policies.
 

MartinB105

Member
Nov 8, 2017
1,633
I just found this great thread, seems like a good place to ask this.

My airline has a programme called "CO2ZERO" which is a donation you can choose to make with each flight that you book. They claim that the donation helps to offset the CO2 emissions from your individual journey by financing the development of clean energy projects in developing countries. It costs almost nothing relative to the cost of each flight. Anyone know if the claims of such programmes are legit?

Doing 2-4 round-trip flights per year is probably the worst thing I do, but their aren't really any other practical options of travel for the places I go.
 

DarthSontin

Member
Oct 25, 2017
853
Pennsylvania
I just found this great thread, seems like a good place to ask this.

My airline has a programme called "CO2ZERO" which is a donation you can choose to make with each flight that you book. They claim that the donation helps to offset the CO2 emissions from your individual journey by financing the development of clean energy projects in developing countries. It costs almost nothing relative to the cost of each flight. Anyone know if the claims of such programmes are legit?

Doing 2-4 round-trip flights per year is probably the worst thing I do, but their aren't really any other practical options of travel for the places I go.
That program looks generally legit, but if you want a really good place to offset emissions check out CoolEffect. They have an extensive verification process, over 90% of the money goes directly to the project, it combines with other UN SDGs, and you can choose which project you want to fund.
 
Oct 30, 2017
1,210
Maybe I'm wrong about this but isn't it ultimately better to protect old growth than to plant new trees? Are there any initiatives to buy up forest to protect it?
 

Dreaver

Member
Oct 27, 2017
82
Small bump.

Long story short, I would love to make a documontary about something climate change related. It's a very interesting topic in my opinion, and I would love to somehow contribute in making people aware. I'll be honest: I'm quite hypocrite because I still eat meat and fly a lot. I work as a filmmaker and I think storytelling is a great way to make people aware. No I'm not going to save the world. But everything starts with being awareness and I am happy if I can contribute in this way. I have access to good gear (+ other people that want to help me). However, it's such a big, intangible subject (my knowledge in this topic is very limited) and we're all sick of the "oh we are fucking up the Earth blabla" stories.

What my question is: does anyone have ideas/inspiration about what would be a interesting//new/fresh topic regards climate change? All inspiration is welcome.
 
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Pomerlaw

Pomerlaw

Member
Feb 25, 2018
2,452
Maybe I'm wrong about this but isn't it ultimately better to protect old growth than to plant new trees? Are there any initiatives to buy up forest to protect it?
Depends. The trees have to grow, that's when they store carbon. Older trees can die and release the carbon they had. I think the key is management, like cut those trees before they die to make houses and buildings, so the carbon in their trunks doesn't get released.

Young trees catch less carbon, but with time, they capture more and more. I think mangroves are the best at capturing carbon because they store it in their roots.

What my question is: does anyone have ideas/inspiration about what would be a interesting//new/fresh topic regards climate change? All inspiration is welcome.
IMO it is young people actually suing governments around the world over climate change :

https://qz.com/1334102/kids-around-the-world-are-suing-governments-over-climate-change-and-its-working/

https://news.nationalgeographic.com/2017/03/kids-sue-us-government-climate-change/

https://montrealgazette.com/news/quebec/young-quebecers-sue-canada-for-climate-negligence
 
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Pomerlaw

Pomerlaw

Member
Feb 25, 2018
2,452
Carbon Free Aluminium

https://business.financialpost.com/commodities/mining/apple-ottawa-and-quebec-back-alcoa-rio-tinto-venture-to-develop-carbon-free-aluminum-smelting

Apple Inc. is backing a joint venture between metal producers Alcoa Corp. and Rio Tinto Group to develop a new aluminum-making process that eliminates greenhouse gases.

The Alcoa-Rio joint venture, which will get initial funding of $188 million ($US147 million), will be based in Montreal and have a research facility in Quebec’s Saguenay region, the aluminum companies said in a statement. The announcement was made with Prime Minister Justin Trudeau on hand along with executives from the three companies. While Alcoa and Rio are developing the technology, which they plan to put on sale beginning in 2024, Apple said it “helped facilitate” the collaboration and will provide technical support.

Aluminum is used in everything from automobiles to airplanes to window frames, and is key to Apple’s own devices. For years, the company has used aluminum in iPhones, iPads, Macs, and Apple Watches.

Apple has pushed for using more environmentally friendly materials in its products. The company is investing $13 million into the joint venture. Rio and Alcoa will be investing $55 million, while the Canadian and Quebec governments will each invest $60 million.

The move combines the efforts of competitors Alcoa, the largest U.S. aluminum producer, and London-based Rio, the world’s No. 2 miner. They appointed Rio executive Vincent Christ to head the venture, to be named Elysis.

For Apple, the public investment is a rare move. While Apple typically invests millions of dollars in the development of new manufacturing processes and key technologies, it often doesn’t discuss them publicly.

Recently, however, the company started a $5 billion fund in the U.S., resulting in investments in companies such as Corning Inc. and Finisar Corp., which make glass for iPhone screens and Face ID sensors, respectively. Five years ago, Apple also invested hundreds of millions of dollars in an Arizona plant for building sapphire crystal iPhone screens, but the deal fell apart due to quality-control problems.

The investment in the new aluminum process is comparatively small monetarily, but could have a big impact on the company’s future environmental efforts. Apple has said it eventually hopes to make its products entirely from recycled materials. It also indicated recently that it reduced its total greenhouse gas emissions by 2 million metric tons between 2016 and 2017.

On its environment report, the company says that 80 percent of greenhouse emissions from an iPhone 8 come during the production phase. This new initiative could reduce that.
 
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Pomerlaw

Pomerlaw

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Feb 25, 2018
2,452
The future hasn’t already been decided. That is, climate change is an inescapable present and future reality, but the point of the IPCC report is that there is still a chance to seize the best-case scenario rather than surrender to the worst. Natan Sharansky, who spent nine years in a gulag for his work with Soviet dissident Andrei Sakharov, recalls his mentor saying: “They want us to believe there’s no chance of success. But whether or not there’s hope for change is not the question. If you want to be a free person, you don’t stand up for human rights because it will work, but because it is right. We must continue living as decent people.” Right now living as decent people means every one of us with resources taking serious climate action, or stepping up what we’re already doing.
https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2018/oct/14/climate-change-taking-action-rebecca-solnit
 

UltimusXI

Member
Oct 27, 2017
144
Great thread!

Easiest step I took lately was to practically only drink tap water. Of course, it depends on the quality of your tap water. I've gotten used to it real quickly. I only drink one glass of soy milk and like two cups of tea all day. Other than that, just tap water all day. Saves so many bottles / cartons, transportation, production.

If you can't stand tap water, get a Sodastream or use other ways to add flavor to your water.
 

nelsonroyale

Member
Oct 28, 2017
2,300
Maybe I'm wrong about this but isn't it ultimately better to protect old growth than to plant new trees? Are there any initiatives to buy up forest to protect it?
I would say yes, but not for purely carbon purposes. old growth forests are gold standard for biodiversity / conservation...and climate change action needs to be well integrated with other agendas. I genuinely think we will fail to mitigate dangerous climate change in any meaningful way if we fail to grasp that the eco crisis is about more than just carbon. In fact, I view climate change as a subset of the eco crisis.
 
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Pomerlaw

Pomerlaw

Member
Feb 25, 2018
2,452
https://qz.com/1486377/global-shipper-maersk-says-it-will-eliminate-fossil-fuels-by-2050/

The world’s largest maritime shipping company is slowly ditching fossil fuels, and in doing so has thrown down a challenge for the rest of the industry to follow suit.
Denmark-based AP Moller Maersk this week said it will cut its carbon emissions completely by 2050. That’s a significant goal for the company, which is part of an industry responsible for about 3% of the world’s emissions, according to the United Nations. If shipping itself were a country, data show it would be the world’s sixth-biggest greenhouse gas emitter. Maersk accounts for about 20% of the world’s sea-based freighting.

The biggest part of the process will be to switch to carbon-neutral ships by 2030, a move that depends on the industry’s ability to find cleaner ways to power their massive container ships. “The only possible way to achieve the so-much-needed decarbonization in our industry is by fully transforming to new carbon neutral fuels and supply chains,” says Søren Toft, a top executive at Maersk.

The company has already aggressively sliced into its carbon footprint. Since 2007, Maersk has reduced overall carbon emissions by 46%, according to the company and media reports. That’s been made possible by about $1 billion in investment into cleaner technology, including the hiring of more than 50 engineers to find those solutions.

If shipping were a country, it'd be the 6th-biggest CO2 emitter
 
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Pomerlaw

Pomerlaw

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Feb 25, 2018
2,452
In the quest to build a better battery, a Canadian is energizing the field

Not only can it be easily constructed almost anywhere on Earth, but unlike most existing rechargeable batteries, it's built to last a very long time. It's shown to be cost-effective, reliable and safe. It never overheats, catches fire or explodes.



If a battery doesn't check all of those boxes, the world won't line up for it, Sadoway says.

"None of us has a 10-year-old lithium-ion battery," he says. "For grid-scale storage, these batteries are going to have to last decades. We can't be swapping them out every three to five years — that's unacceptable."
https://www.cbc.ca/news/technology/don-sadoway-david-bradwell-battery-invention-1.4945615
 
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Pomerlaw

Pomerlaw

Member
Feb 25, 2018
2,452
Good job Scotland!


Scottish wind power produced more than 100% of the threshold for the first time, generating enough energy to power 6 million homes.

The National Grid energy requirement for November saw both on and offshore wind produce more than the required demand on 20 of 30 days.

Powering 109% of the total energy requirement, the new figures set a new record for wind generation in Scotland.

Gina Hanrahan, head of policy at WWF Scotland said: “Wind power breaking through the magic 100% threshold is truly momentous.
https://www.energyvoice.com/otherenergy/187877/scottish-wind-power-smashes-100-production-threshold/?fbclid=IwAR1O-iXNtGXc63LqQwaPBcCBd65V-ka2bA_gDl-2d_mQwvB9-LHc9nClIzw
 
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Pomerlaw

Pomerlaw

Member
Feb 25, 2018
2,452
https://medium.com/s/2069/finally-fusion-power-is-about-to-become-a-reality-c6b8b5915cf5

Finally, Fusion Power Is About to Become a Reality
Long considered a joke, or a pipe dream, fusion is suddenly making enormous leaps

Real, live, economically viable power plants could then follow in the 2030s. No joke. When I ask Whyte, who is 54, to compare his level of optimism now to any other point in his career, he says, simply: “It is at the maximum.”

But it’s not just MIT. At least 10 other startups also are trying new approaches to fusion power. All of them contend that it’s no longer a tantalizingly tricky science experiment, and is becoming a matter of engineering. If even just one of these ventures can pull it off, the energy source of the future is closer than it seems.

“It’s remarkable,” says David Kingham, executive vice chairman of Tokamak Energy, a British company whose goal is to put fusion power on the grid by 2030. “The world has been waiting for fusion for a long time.”
 

Roy

Banned
Oct 27, 2017
2,434
Anybody else notice many alt rightists are now not outright denying climate change but saying that it has absolutely no effect on people? I think it’s to separate themselves from flat Earthers but still extremely stupid and just as malicious.
 
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Pomerlaw

Pomerlaw

Member
Feb 25, 2018
2,452
The 16-year-old activist behind the fast-growing School Strikes 4 Climate Action has taken her campaign to the streets of Davos, to confront world leaders and business chiefs about the global emissions crisis.

Greta Thunberg, whose solo protest outside Sweden’s parliament has snowballed across the globe, will join a strike by Swiss schoolchildren in the ski resort on Friday – the final day of the World Economic Forum.

Thunberg travelled by train for 32 hours to reach Davos, and spent Wednesday night camped with climate scientists on the mountain slopes – where temperatures plunged to -18C.

Having already addressed the UN Climate Change COP 24 conference, Thunberg is rapidly becoming the voice for a generation who are demanding urgent action to slow the rise in global temperatures.

As she travelled down Davos’s funicular railway from the Arctic Base Camp – while more than 30,000 students were striking in Belgium - Thunberg said the rapid growth of her movement was “incredible”.

“There have been climate strikes, involving students and also adults, on every continent except Antarctica. It has involved tens of thousands of children.”
https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2019/jan/24/school-strikes-over-climate-change-continue-to-snowball?fbclid=IwAR2Tnlx8D3Ptxtwhk6DcYReJutgFigL4JW7Tj6Sf0knYiPe-l6ppdqcq9kc
 

Tamerlane

Member
Oct 27, 2017
108
Does anyone else think that the argument against electric cars in regards to how the electricity is generated is disingenuous? I believe the theoretical maximum efficiency of a combustion engine is around 14%; the rest of the energy in the gasoline is exhausted as waste heat. A power plant much more efficiently converts fossil fuels into electricity than an ICE converts them into motion. Even if the electricity used to charge an EV comes from coal or gas it takes that energy and uses 80-90% of it for motion.
 
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Pomerlaw

Pomerlaw

Member
Feb 25, 2018
2,452
Her quote at Davos is amazing :

Adults keep saying: “We owe it to the young people to give them hope.” But I don’t want your hope. I don’t want you to be hopeful. I want you to panic. I want you to feel the fear I feel every day. And then I want you to act.

I want you to act as you would in a crisis. I want you to act as if our house is on fire. Because it is.