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Parasite (a film by Bong Joon-ho, 2019) |OT| Don't read anything about it, go watch it blind, thank us later

Failburger

Member
Dec 3, 2018
646
Talking about the cake shop.

Was there an implied link between him and Mr. Kim? When they are eating together they say something about one of Kim's jobs he lost being a cake shop if I remember right? Then when the guy in the shelter mentions the camera seems to linger on Kim like he is realizing something. It never comes up though.

I'm pretty sure that he scammed the cake shop much like he's scamming the rich family.
 

Smoolio

Avenger
Oct 25, 2017
538
Really want to like this movie more but the point I mentioned early in the thread just brings down my enjoyment so much, am I perhaps not looking at this aspect in the right way? Or is there some themes/symbolism that makes this part resonate and not be arbitrary shock value? Or even worse, only exist to provide manpain for the others?
Loved it except for one bit that really brings it down for me, was ready to call it my favorite movie of the year until this bit.
The fate of Ki-jung the sister was totally unnecessary I thought, really felt like the adventure of the four of them yet one is offed unceremoniously and only given a few lines of dialogue. Completely unsatisfying narratively for me :(
Like after that point it:
Really reveals itself as the story of the son and his dad to me, even the mother feels inconsequential from then on.
 

RepairmanJack

Member
Oct 27, 2017
5,229
Really want to like this movie more but the point I mentioned early in the thread just brings down my enjoyment so much, am I perhaps not looking at this aspect in the right way? Or is there some themes/symbolism that makes this part resonate and not be arbitrary shock value? Or even worse, only exist to provide manpain for the others?

Like after that point it:
Really reveals itself as the story of the son and his dad to me, even the mother feels inconsequential from then on.
I took it as the kids, being the only ones really hurt, are kind of the ones effected most by this life that the parents most likely got them in. There's all the talk of her being the best of the family and how she'd be the best con artist eventually. While also showing how they actually had skill and ability in actual trades but weren't going to schooling for them.
 

Smoolio

Avenger
Oct 25, 2017
538
I took it as the kids, being the only ones really hurt, are kind of the ones effected most by this life that the parents most likely got them in. There's all the talk of her being the best of the family and how she'd be the best con artist eventually. While also showing how they actually had skill and ability in actual trades but weren't going to schooling for them.
With that interpretation I would of liked the ending to be the fever dream of the father and the reveal that the son died too.
 

whatsinaname

Member
Oct 25, 2017
5,864
I'm pretty sure that he scammed the cake shop much like he's scamming the rich family.
Cake shop:

I don’t think it was that. I was reading somewhere (possibly in this thread) that the castella cake shop thing was a big craze where lots of older people looking for a retirement path put all their savings in and went bankrupt. So I think it was just setting a backgeound

Edit: Found the link, was on reddit.



One of the things that I noticed while listening to some podcasts about the movie was the mentioning of the Taiwanese sponge cake. I'm not sure if the English subtitle translated it differently, but Taiwanese sponge cake comment directly refers to a specific Korean social phenomena. In the movie, the father of the Kims is said to have tried and failed in the Taiwanese sponge cake (Taiwanese "castella") business. The guy who lived in the basement of the Parks also mentions he had failed in the same business, resulting in a lot of debt.


Taiwanese Castella is more of a huge Chiffon cake-ish bread that supposedly is a very common street food in Taiwan. Korean tourist just started calling those "Taiwanese castellas" and spread words that it was the go-to street food in Taiwan. Having tasted it, it is less sweet than the Japanese "castellas" but has more egg-taste, which some people like. Naturally, it found its way into Korea around 2016.


Korea has had a social issue with people (usually people retiring from office jobs in their 50s) spending all of their retirement funds in small food businesses (especially fried chicken shops), or any other food business that's popular at that specific time. Obviously, MOST of those people end up losing money and the business folding. A LOT of Taiwanese castella shops started popping up around 2016 and it was the craze of the country for a very short while. People would line up around the building so that they could buy one. And then the AI (Avian Influenza) hit Korea. Egg prices skyrocketed and a lot of Taiwanese castella shops folded. A TV report about how low quality cooking oil was used in making those Castellas didn't help either.


So with that as the background, the fact that two poor husband/father of a poor family making poor money/business decision in starting a food business because it's the "hip" thing to do at the time and failing miserably... is something that's pretty close to a lot of Korean's heart.
 

RepairmanJack

Member
Oct 27, 2017
5,229
Cake shop:

I don’t think it was that. I was reading somewhere (possibly in this thread) that the castella cake shop thing was a big craze where lots of older people looking for a retirement path put all their savings in and went bankrupt. So I think it was just setting a backgeound

Edit: Found the link, was on reddit.



One of the things that I noticed while listening to some podcasts about the movie was the mentioning of the Taiwanese sponge cake. I'm not sure if the English subtitle translated it differently, but Taiwanese sponge cake comment directly refers to a specific Korean social phenomena. In the movie, the father of the Kims is said to have tried and failed in the Taiwanese sponge cake (Taiwanese "castella") business. The guy who lived in the basement of the Parks also mentions he had failed in the same business, resulting in a lot of debt.


Taiwanese Castella is more of a huge Chiffon cake-ish bread that supposedly is a very common street food in Taiwan. Korean tourist just started calling those "Taiwanese castellas" and spread words that it was the go-to street food in Taiwan. Having tasted it, it is less sweet than the Japanese "castellas" but has more egg-taste, which some people like. Naturally, it found its way into Korea around 2016.


Korea has had a social issue with people (usually people retiring from office jobs in their 50s) spending all of their retirement funds in small food businesses (especially fried chicken shops), or any other food business that's popular at that specific time. Obviously, MOST of those people end up losing money and the business folding. A LOT of Taiwanese castella shops started popping up around 2016 and it was the craze of the country for a very short while. People would line up around the building so that they could buy one. And then the AI (Avian Influenza) hit Korea. Egg prices skyrocketed and a lot of Taiwanese castella shops folded. A TV report about how low quality cooking oil was used in making those Castellas didn't help either.


So with that as the background, the fact that two poor husband/father of a poor family making poor money/business decision in starting a food business because it's the "hip" thing to do at the time and failing miserably... is something that's pretty close to a lot of Korean's heart.
Ok, that fits way more with the overall themes. Makes sense.
 

Failburger

Member
Dec 3, 2018
646
Cake shop:

I don’t think it was that. I was reading somewhere (possibly in this thread) that the castella cake shop thing was a big craze where lots of older people looking for a retirement path put all their savings in and went bankrupt. So I think it was just setting a backgeound

Edit: Found the link, was on reddit.



One of the things that I noticed while listening to some podcasts about the movie was the mentioning of the Taiwanese sponge cake. I'm not sure if the English subtitle translated it differently, but Taiwanese sponge cake comment directly refers to a specific Korean social phenomena. In the movie, the father of the Kims is said to have tried and failed in the Taiwanese sponge cake (Taiwanese "castella") business. The guy who lived in the basement of the Parks also mentions he had failed in the same business, resulting in a lot of debt.


Taiwanese Castella is more of a huge Chiffon cake-ish bread that supposedly is a very common street food in Taiwan. Korean tourist just started calling those "Taiwanese castellas" and spread words that it was the go-to street food in Taiwan. Having tasted it, it is less sweet than the Japanese "castellas" but has more egg-taste, which some people like. Naturally, it found its way into Korea around 2016.


Korea has had a social issue with people (usually people retiring from office jobs in their 50s) spending all of their retirement funds in small food businesses (especially fried chicken shops), or any other food business that's popular at that specific time. Obviously, MOST of those people end up losing money and the business folding. A LOT of Taiwanese castella shops started popping up around 2016 and it was the craze of the country for a very short while. People would line up around the building so that they could buy one. And then the AI (Avian Influenza) hit Korea. Egg prices skyrocketed and a lot of Taiwanese castella shops folded. A TV report about how low quality cooking oil was used in making those Castellas didn't help either.


So with that as the background, the fact that two poor husband/father of a poor family making poor money/business decision in starting a food business because it's the "hip" thing to do at the time and failing miserably... is something that's pretty close to a lot of Korean's heart.
Oh wow, this ties in with the theme very well. I hope this movie gets a really good English commentary track that goes into details about things like this.

This reminds me how in ‘Tale of Two Sisters’ there was a quick shot of a tent in the middle of the road as characters in the movie were driving to the house. I spent months trying to think up some meaning behind that tent only to find out that it’sa common thing in that area.
 

Natiko

Member
Oct 25, 2017
3,631
Four of us went in and watched this blind a couple days ago. None of us had seen a trailer, read a synopsis, anything. What a great experience - all four of us loved it.
 

DJwest

Member
Oct 26, 2017
3,222
OK WTF? Yooooo.
I was halfway through the movie, having a good time and laughing my ass off. Then shit got real. Fantastic movie
 

spx54

Member
Mar 21, 2019
2,231
this is sitting with me much better than I thought it would

still have mixed feelings about the ending though
 

Khanimus

Avenger
Oct 25, 2017
15,997
Greater Vancouver
I remember in the Joker thread, someone was praising it as some "scathing indictment of the rich." Whoever said that needs to fucking watch this.

It was fucking fantastic. The ending was fucking perfect. You could not put a more poetically appropriate button on this.

This brain-damaged kid makes a plan that the solution to his problem, the key that will unlock his father's cell and allow him to climb the stairs, is *drumroll* CAPITALISM!
 
Oct 27, 2017
326
Did anyone see subtitles of a song that plays at the end? I saw an interview in which the actor who played the son mentions he sang a song at the end of the movie with lyrics by Bong Joon Ho. I didn't stick around through the credits but it sounds interesting.

Apparently

There are lyrics about how impossible it would be to ever afford that house.


Can you tell me what you think of the ending? Do you think Ki-woo could earn enough money to buy that house?
It was really touching. Really sad, terrible. I felt so sad for Ki-woo. Do you know about that song that plays after the ending scroll?

No, tell me.
I sing a song. There’s a song that plays during the credits, and director Bong actually wrote the lyrics. The song is about how Ki-woo spent his days trying to earn money to purchase that house. It would take 564 years for Ki-woo to actually save up the money in order to buy that house. It’s almost impossible for him to buy the house. When I first read it, I felt really sorry for Ki-woo, but I’m pretty sure Ki-woo is one of those bright kids. He’ll come up with some idea, and he would just go into the German family’s house, and I think he will rescue his father.
So now I'm curious about the lyrics of that song.
 

kvetcha

Member
Oct 27, 2017
6,309
Talking about the cake shop.

Was there an implied link between him and Mr. Kim? When they are eating together they say something about one of Kim's jobs he lost being a cake shop if I remember right? Then when the guy in the shelter mentions the camera seems to linger on Kim like he is realizing something. It never comes up though.
This was apparently a very rapid boom-bust cycle that occurred in South Korea that the audience there would be familiar with. Like how froyo shops were everywhere in the US for a little while and then most of them vanished.
 

theBmZ

Avenger
Oct 29, 2017
1,106
Finally came to my city, and just got out a few hours ago. It is a masterpiece. I went in with very, very little information, and was pleasantly surprised, and delighted by the what the film was actually about. The performances, the cinematography, the themes, it’s all just masterfully crafted. And it just might have overtaken The Lighthouse and Midsommar as my number 1 this year.
 

Dany

Member
Oct 29, 2017
2,451
seattle
My mom is primarly spanish speaking but can watch english movies and follow the plot fairly well. My brother took her to see this and I was worried she wouldn’t be able to understand anything with korean talk and english subs. She said it was one of her favorite movies of all time. After thinking on it more, it does make sense. The action of the characters are self explanitory to what is happening in the story.
 

SaintBowWow

Avenger
Oct 25, 2017
2,579
Do any other flickering lights in the film actually mean anything in morse code?
There’s a segment where the man in the basement is pounding out a message with his head and it’s intercut with the flooding of the half-basement. The light in the half-basement is also flickering and I have a real hunch that it translates to something.

Edit: Shit, sorry to anyone who saw the open spoilers
 
Last edited:

kvetcha

Member
Oct 27, 2017
6,309
Do any other flickering lights in the film actually mean anything in morse code?
There’s a segment where the man in the basement is pounding out a message with his head and it’s intercut with the flooding of the half-basement. The light in the half-basement is also flickering and I have a real hunch that it translates to something.
I believe it cuts to the young son translating the Morse code to ‘HALP ME’ in his notebook. Once again, he is the only person in the Park family picking up that something unusual is happening.
 

SaintBowWow

Avenger
Oct 25, 2017
2,579
I believe it cuts to the young son translating the Morse code to ‘HALP ME’ in his notebook. Once again, he is the only person in the Park family picking up that something unusual is happening.
Yes that’s what the man in the basement was typing but in suspecting that there might be messages in flickering lights elsewhere in the movie, particularly when the half basement of flooding.
 

YaBish

Member
Oct 27, 2017
2,130
Saw this and The Lighthouse in a double feature this last Monday. After sitting with them for a week, I think I prefer Parasite.

It’s going to be really hard for me to not compare these two movies forever in my brain.
 

SaintBowWow

Avenger
Oct 25, 2017
2,579
Watched Snowpiercer last night then this this morning. Very good movie and delicately made.
Where was the money they made going and if they were so good at their jobs why the scams? They could hold those jobs legitimately. Bad economy?
The dad and mom were the only ones actually doing their jobs. The son was just hooking up with his student and the daughter was bullshitting absolutely everything. They couldn’t get these jobs legitimately because they don’t actually have credentials which is why they wormed their way in via a string of recommendations.
 

JigglesBunny

Avenger
Oct 27, 2017
7,605
Chicago
Finally had some time to see this, really fucking happy about that. A rock solid 8.5/10 for me, only losing some points there because the
escape sequence went on a little too long and it felt like there were three different endings
but it’s an insanely funny, sharp and pointed thriller about class disparity that never bores or lets up for a moment.

Another Bong masterwork, probably going to find itself somewhere in my top 10 of the year.
 

BorkBork

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,460
Such a great movie. Beautifully shot, tonally masterful, wonderful performances. We were talking about it for a day afterwards.
 

xyla

Member
Oct 27, 2017
2,202
Germany
Watched the movie - I feel like all the "don't get spoiled" talk overhyped the story to a certain extent for me. I still enjoyed it, but there was no incomprehensible switch or twist in the way the story developed. It all made sense in the way it moved from a to b and in the way it unfolded. But at no point was the story in itself at a level that would (in itself) be worthy of the hype. It was really good and competently told, but the real deal is all the social themes and an unbelievably well done cinematography elevating the material!

I'm a person that likes to be sold on a story at face value first and then dive into underlying themes and concepts. Here the social critique managed to completely floor me though. The way almost every shot was able to tell you something about how the rich and the poor interact and how the "Parasite" theme is woven into all of this.

My favorite shot might be:

When the flood happened and they were back in their old flat, the boy manages to "save" the stone and is standing, water/shit up to his waist in the right side of the frame, while his father is looking for him in the left one. The light is flickering and we see him in light and dark for a few seconds. The stone as the heavy prospect for aspiring richness and a better life, himself being drowned because he's poor and the light switching showing how he is being torn apart between wanting to do whatever necessary for him and his family to stay in the middle class and keep climbing (murder the old housekeeper and husband) and resolving the situation in a good way (whatever that might be).

It was also really well done how
The rich father was completely unresponsive towards the poor girl being stabbed and bleeding to death and only caring for his son that had nothing serious. And Mr. Kim obying and throwing him the car key instead of trying to safe his own.

The levels in which you can analyse some shots in this movie is insane in a Kubrick kind of way. I really appreciate it for what it did here, even if the story didn't wow me away at face level.
 

thediamondage

Member
Oct 25, 2017
4,508
Saw this today, went in completely blind to the point of hilarity actually, all I knew was the title and high RT scores and I thought this was a straight up horror movie based on the title. I kept expecting creepy ass shit to come out of the darkness, only about halfway thru the movie I finally realized "oh, this is a dark comedy!"

Really enjoyed it, probably not as high as most other people but still sticks with me. This and Jojo Rabbit have been the highlights of the last few months in movies. I still haven't watched Okja, gotta correct that this weekend. Maybe rewatch Snowpiercer while I'm at it. Its too bad they aren't putting out the Snowpiercer TV show now, woulda been perfect synergy.