Parasite (a film by Bong Joon-ho, 2019) |OT| Don't read anything about it, go watch it blind, thank us later

Strax

Member
Oct 28, 2017
1,085
I mean, it was clear she was rushed out of the house without any time to consider her next steps. And the bunker doesn't lead anywhere.
Poorly worded on my part. I meant she could go in some way that only she would know about, like she knew about the bunker. Not via the bunker.
 

kvetcha

Member
Oct 27, 2017
6,993
Poorly worded on my part. I meant she could go in some way that only she would know about, like she knew about the bunker. Not via the bunker.
Ah, I see what you're saying.

I guess I felt it was a movie where everyone became wrapped up in their own little parcel of existence that they completely lost track of any larger picture. It's both deeply critical of the capitalist system and weirdly sympathetic to the people, rich and poor, who live in it.
 
OP
OP

Birdseye

Banned
Oct 27, 2017
13,464
More info on the artwork (source: The Jokers on Twitter)::

Well, the artwork of #Parasite's steelbook leaked in a quality that doesn't pay it tribute... So here it is! The design is signed by Korean artist Choi Ji-su.

Since the artwork can be appreciated front and back, here is the complete, flattened version of the poster!



When leaving the theater after seeing Parasite, you may have thought that you remembered exactly where each room in the Park family home was located. This is far from a coincidence, since Bong Joon Ho himself drew the layout of the house. "The architects told me it was impossible, but I insisted," he said.

We wanted to materialize this brilliant vision by Bong Joon Ho, with a steelbook artwork that would be a representation of the Park family's house, as we visualize it space when we leave the theater. Our first reference was the work of artist Chris Ware, and our Korean friends at Plain Archive quickly put us on the path of Choi Ji-su, a talented Korean artist accustomed to this kind of representation in space.

We're aware that this choice of artwork is quite unusual, but rather than bringing out the movie poster again or yet another minimalist fanart, we wanted to offer you a object that's playful and consistent with the film!

See you at the beginning of January for the artwork of our collector's edition, with the box set (made by Marie Bergeron) and the storyboard (cover designed by Bong Joon Ho himself). We'll also tell you more about the bonuses that will appear in the edition.
 

Devin

Member
Oct 27, 2017
781
Finally saw this Saturday night, and really loved it. Probably my favorite film this year. I was surprised that the theater was still practically full.
 

NarohDethan

Member
Oct 27, 2017
8,196
Really really liked it, didn't quite love it. Not my favorite of Joon Ho's, but I definitely liked it more than Snowpiercer and Okja. I feel like stuff around the ending sequences didn't quite make sense and seemed a little forced , but theres so many amazing scenes and beats that I still really liked it overall. Can't wait to see it again actually.

Why the hell are there buttons for lights in a hidden bunker? Like I get some type of thing and that morse code would be a thought, but the main entryway lights? Also the suddenness of the narrative of the dad being a cockroach and thinking about the smell and then Park in the heat of all the chaos is worried about holding his nose to grab his car keys. Just kind of took me out of it.
Very late to the party but

The guy just had 4 people stabbed in his fucking yard and what repulsed him was the smell. Poor people might be dying but they make better sure to know that they disgust him.

Just came from the theater, fucking hell, what a great film.
 

Ehoavash

Member
Oct 28, 2017
4,207
Sigh only 2 movie theaters are playing this and they're far away. Waiting on the Blu-ray..

Btw is this movie very slow burn?? Like I couldn't stand movies like arrival cause it was such a slow burn
 

Messofanego

Member
Oct 25, 2017
8,287
UK
Saw it last night at Picturehouse Central as an early screening cause it's out in Feb in UK. We both loved it. The dark comedy and tragedy were excellent, along with the cinematography and acting. Song Kang-ho is great in anything, no wonder the two powerhouse Korean directors, Bong Joon-ho and Chan-wook Park, put him in most of their films.
 

Idde

Member
Oct 27, 2017
269
I'm avoiding all the spoilers about this (aside from reading it's really good), so no clue what it's about. Just a quick question though, is it really dark/fucked up? Like, Oldboy dark? Cause I really want to see this, but I'm not in the mood for that sort of stuff.
 

More_Badass

Member
Oct 25, 2017
17,521
I'm avoiding all the spoilers about this (aside from reading it's really good), so no clue what it's about. Just a quick question though, is it really dark/fucked up? Like, Oldboy dark? Cause I really want to see this, but I'm not in the mood for that sort of stuff.
There’s some dark elements, but it’s not in the Oldboy category of South Korean soul-crushing. Honestly kind of refreshing
 

Idde

Member
Oct 27, 2017
269
Not that kind of dark.
There’s some dark elements, but it’s not in the Oldboy category of South Korean soul-crushing. Honestly kind of refreshing
Thanks. And good to hear. I generally like South Korean cinema, but some of it can be a bit much at times. Snowpiercer was also sort of dark, but not too dark. I'll see this next weekend.
 

Tochtli79

Member
Jun 27, 2019
891
Mexico City
Watched it last week, unsure of what to expect going in, so the twists completely got to me. It was a great film. I feel like a lot of people in general audiences will purely be judgmental of the poor families and not pick up on the criticisms of the fucked up system.
 

Ottaro

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,064
I watched it for a second time over the weekend and it was surprisingly a packed house!
It was so great seeing an audience react to the big moments again.
You can sense everyone’s body tense up when the former housekeeper is trying to push the shelf. Then the audience gasps right on cue when the housekeeper first calls for her husband.
 

MrKlaw

Member
Oct 25, 2017
9,531
Watched on a flight yesterday. Realily enjoyed it, and the ambiguity of the characters - who do we root for, do we root for anyone - really gets to you by the end. There are gentle turns in the plot that invite you to guess how things will proceed - some pay off while others are just loose threads that go nowhere. That relative ambiguity of plot adds to the oddness and makes it difficult to ever feel ‘comfortable’ with knowing where things are going or what characters will do.

eg

the flashing lights and the boy scout thing - you see the small child start working it out - teasing something that doesn’t actually happen

my only real bugbear - and I think it fits with the inability to ever feel like you know what’s happening so perhaps just a personal thing

at the end climax, i thought maybe the family gets away with things (relativel) as the guy from the basement would be seen as a crazy person attacking them. If only the dad didn’t stab the Dad.
 

Rover

Member
Oct 25, 2017
2,637
I finally got around to seeing this tonight, and I liked it.

I'm gonna give some general non-spoiler commentary on the movie, and add some specific examples in spoiler tags.

-

This movie really made me think about the expectations we set for movies, and how silly it is to feel like a movie is worse because the story didn't go where we wanted it to. I went into this mostly blind (just knowing the general premise), but I had already formed this idea in my head about how this story would play out. Although this forecast changed as the movie went along, I was essentially trying to expect a story I wanted and a story I already knew.

But if you saw the movie, you know it gets a little weirder and more complicated than what you probably expected.

As the family gets fully embedded in the house as fakes, it was obvious that they had to get caught somehow. But then I was thinking there would be some kind of twist, like "the rich family are the real parasites!", or the con artist family would resolve to completely replace the rich family somehow - maybe by murder if necessary.

By the time Da-song's corny birthday party in the third act started up with the saccharine music, I thought "oh yeah, they're definitely going to kill everybody", but even this thing I wanted turned pretty chilling when the basement husband guy breaks out. Him smashing Ki-woo with the rock, and walking outside to the party hit me less like a revenge fantasy and more real and horrifying.


I think my initial takeaway as the credits rolled was a little disappointment that the movie didn't turn out the way I wanted. But on my way home I thought about how much of a dumpster fire the discourse around Star Wars has been as of late, for the same exact reason - people built up these really absurd expectations and wrote the script for those movies in their heads before they even bought the ticket to see it.

What Parasite ended up doing was surprising me with a lot of tension and things I didn't expect. When the movie decided to veer off course, it turned to horror to keep me in suspense about what was going to unfold. Not to say Parasite is a horror movie, but it uses a lot of the same tricks to create this swell of uncertainty that takes us into the next act and the unraveling weirdness of this story.

I really liked the way they staged the entire transition from 'completing the con' to the old hosuekeeper showing up at the door, with a lot of these horror elements leading up to something somewhat mundane?

We go from this very relaxed "Hanging out at the cabin by the lake" thing with that big window and the yard behind them, the rain pouring as they're drinking and joking around in the living room, then the lightning starts, and you know something is building up, people are getting more drunk, and then the lady shows up, and she's acting really shifty, gets into that exaggerated position to push the shelf in the basement (it almost looks like she's crawling on the wall), and then we find the sub-basement.

Other stuff comes to mind like the basement man traumatizing Da-song in the kitchen, or the scene where they're in the car and he's talking about the service company business card and almost gets into an accident. It's all pretty clearly inspired from horror and suspense.


Another labored movie comparison I thought about is with Roma. They are two wildly different movies, but there is a story about class here that both movies stage in some comparable ways. I wont say too much about it outside of a spoiler tag (and I stress that the movies are very different!), but I find it interesting how each of them carry out this story.

Roma and Parasite both center around this rich family in a big house, both of them well-off enough to have this entitled attitude about people serving them, and both follow those servant characters as they deal with rich people problems.

In Roma, there is a lot of context and background that sets the story. They take us through some historical events, as well as some more personal moments within the family that give some clues about the people who would be well-off in that time and place. The family is pretty clearly shit to the maid, and to each other. Despite that, the maid seems to truly care for their kids, and by the end it's a pretty devastating and complicated mess.

Parasite never really lets us get to a point where we hate the rich family. Sure, they have some upsetting attitudes, but the mom is "simple" and the dad is intense but...actually kind of a good father? There are few, if any, scenes I remember where they are being abusive. I don't know if this is intended to make these characters more ambiguous, or it's a shortcoming of the movie's point of view. The thing about movies like this (and this was a criticism that Roma got a lot) was that these types of movies want us to identify with the poors when we, as the audience able to afford seeing these movies, probably have more in common with the rich.

Likewise, I never really liked the con artist family, either. Smart cons are fun to watch, and being unusually good-looking people certainly can't hurt their aims. But while these characters thankfully weren't edgelords, the movie didn't seem interested in giving them a moral center. I was especially grossed out at Ki-woo getting together with that high school girl. And you know his friend from the beginning of the movie was doing the same thing when she was even younger. They're both trash.

Another thing I found interesting, but didn't quite have the context for, was why the old housekeeper lady and her husband are so into North Korea. Why is her impression of the NK propaganda news lady that good and passionate? Why does the man refer to the blackmail video on the phone so excitedly that it's like a "missile from North Korea"? Why does he have such an emphatic, military-like respect for the father?

I feel like I'm missing the cultural context about SK's class and politics, but I wouldn't hold that against the movie.


Finally, I'm sure this has been said a bunch, but what a great-looking movie. I saw it at a small independent art theater, and despite the small screen their picture quality was really nice and this movie flexed it. I'm also floored by what I'm reading here about how much of the movie was custom built sets.
 

More_Badass

Member
Oct 25, 2017
17,521
I finally got around to seeing this tonight, and I liked it.

I'm gonna give some general non-spoiler commentary on the movie, and add some specific examples in spoiler tags.

-

This movie really made me think about the expectations we set for movies, and how silly it is to feel like a movie is worse because the story didn't go where we wanted it to. I went into this mostly blind (just knowing the general premise), but I had already formed this idea in my head about how this story would play out. Although this forecast changed as the movie went along, I was essentially trying to expect a story I wanted and a story I already knew.

But if you saw the movie, you know it gets a little weirder and more complicated than what you probably expected.

As the family gets fully embedded in the house as fakes, it was obvious that they had to get caught somehow. But then I was thinking there would be some kind of twist, like "the rich family are the real parasites!", or the con artist family would resolve to completely replace the rich family somehow - maybe by murder if necessary.

By the time Da-song's corny birthday party in the third act started up with the saccharine music, I thought "oh yeah, they're definitely going to kill everybody", but even this thing I wanted turned pretty chilling when the basement husband guy breaks out. Him smashing Ki-woo with the rock, and walking outside to the party hit me less like a revenge fantasy and more real and horrifying.


I think my initial takeaway as the credits rolled was a little disappointment that the movie didn't turn out the way I wanted. But on my way home I thought about how much of a dumpster fire the discourse around Star Wars has been as of late, for the same exact reason - people built up these really absurd expectations and wrote the script for those movies in their heads before they even bought the ticket to see it.

What Parasite ended up doing was surprising me with a lot of tension and things I didn't expect. When the movie decided to veer off course, it turned to horror to keep me in suspense about what was going to unfold. Not to say Parasite is a horror movie, but it uses a lot of the same tricks to create this swell of uncertainty that takes us into the next act and the unraveling weirdness of this story.

I really liked the way they staged the entire transition from 'completing the con' to the old hosuekeeper showing up at the door, with a lot of these horror elements leading up to something somewhat mundane?

We go from this very relaxed "Hanging out at the cabin by the lake" thing with that big window and the yard behind them, the rain pouring as they're drinking and joking around in the living room, then the lightning starts, and you know something is building up, people are getting more drunk, and then the lady shows up, and she's acting really shifty, gets into that exaggerated position to push the shelf in the basement (it almost looks like she's crawling on the wall), and then we find the sub-basement.

Other stuff comes to mind like the basement man traumatizing Da-song in the kitchen, or the scene where they're in the car and he's talking about the service company business card and almost gets into an accident. It's all pretty clearly inspired from horror and suspense.


Another labored movie comparison I thought about is with Roma. They are two wildly different movies, but there is a story about class here that both movies stage in some comparable ways. I wont say too much about it outside of a spoiler tag (and I stress that the movies are very different!), but I find it interesting how each of them carry out this story.

Roma and Parasite both center around this rich family in a big house, both of them well-off enough to have this entitled attitude about people serving them, and both follow those servant characters as they deal with rich people problems.

In Roma, there is a lot of context and background that sets the story. They take us through some historical events, as well as some more personal moments within the family that give some clues about the people who would be well-off in that time and place. The family is pretty clearly shit to the maid, and to each other. Despite that, the maid seems to truly care for their kids, and by the end it's a pretty devastating and complicated mess.

Parasite never really lets us get to a point where we hate the rich family. Sure, they have some upsetting attitudes, but the mom is "simple" and the dad is intense but...actually kind of a good father? There are few, if any, scenes I remember where they are being abusive. I don't know if this is intended to make these characters more ambiguous, or it's a shortcoming of the movie's point of view. The thing about movies like this (and this was a criticism that Roma got a lot) was that these types of movies want us to identify with the poors when we, as the audience able to afford seeing these movies, probably have more in common with the rich.

Likewise, I never really liked the con artist family, either. Smart cons are fun to watch, and being unusually good-looking people certainly can't hurt their aims. But while these characters thankfully weren't edgelords, the movie didn't seem interested in giving them a moral center. I was especially grossed out at Ki-woo getting together with that high school girl. And you know his friend from the beginning of the movie was doing the same thing when she was even younger. They're both trash.

Another thing I found interesting, but didn't quite have the context for, was why the old housekeeper lady and her husband are so into North Korea. Why is her impression of the NK propaganda news lady that good and passionate? Why does the man refer to the blackmail video on the phone so excitedly that it's like a "missile from North Korea"? Why does he have such an emphatic, military-like respect for the father?

I feel like I'm missing the cultural context about SK's class and politics, but I wouldn't hold that against the movie.


Finally, I'm sure this has been said a bunch, but what a great-looking movie. I saw it at a small independent art theater, and despite the small screen their picture quality was really nice and this movie flexed it. I'm also floored by what I'm reading here about how much of the movie was custom built sets.
Not making the rich family villains and making the poor family kind of unlikable was definitely by design and a compelling thematic choice. Like they were always kind of unlikable when they’re forcing other service workers out of jobs to take for themselves, but it’s caper-style thrilling and funny. But when the mid-act swerve comes and they’re flexing privilege on the housekeeper and husband, it’s in direct contrast to the “I’d be nicer if I was rich” notion earlier. Nah, it just makes them more selfish and caustic.
 

Dalek

Member
Oct 25, 2017
14,434
I finally got around to seeing this tonight, and I liked it.

I'm gonna give some general non-spoiler commentary on the movie, and add some specific examples in spoiler tags.

-

This movie really made me think about the expectations we set for movies, and how silly it is to feel like a movie is worse because the story didn't go where we wanted it to. I went into this mostly blind (just knowing the general premise), but I had already formed this idea in my head about how this story would play out. Although this forecast changed as the movie went along, I was essentially trying to expect a story I wanted and a story I already knew.

But if you saw the movie, you know it gets a little weirder and more complicated than what you probably expected.

As the family gets fully embedded in the house as fakes, it was obvious that they had to get caught somehow. But then I was thinking there would be some kind of twist, like "the rich family are the real parasites!", or the con artist family would resolve to completely replace the rich family somehow - maybe by murder if necessary.

By the time Da-song's corny birthday party in the third act started up with the saccharine music, I thought "oh yeah, they're definitely going to kill everybody", but even this thing I wanted turned pretty chilling when the basement husband guy breaks out. Him smashing Ki-woo with the rock, and walking outside to the party hit me less like a revenge fantasy and more real and horrifying.


I think my initial takeaway as the credits rolled was a little disappointment that the movie didn't turn out the way I wanted. But on my way home I thought about how much of a dumpster fire the discourse around Star Wars has been as of late, for the same exact reason - people built up these really absurd expectations and wrote the script for those movies in their heads before they even bought the ticket to see it.
I’ve been saying this for years and I made a thread about it here. A movie should be judged on its own merits and not on the expectations or “hype” that you built up for it. It’s a bizarre trend that I see here on Era all the time. Someone watches an acclaimed movie late and their take is “This was good I guess but it didn’t live up to my expectations.”
 
OP
OP

Birdseye

Banned
Oct 27, 2017
13,464
I’ve been saying this for years and I made a thread about it here. A movie should be judged on its own merits and not on the expectations or “hype” that you built up for it. It’s a bizarre trend that I see here on Era all the time. Someone watches an acclaimed movie late and their take is “This was good I guess but it didn’t live up to my expectations.”
I've read people saying Midsommar was bad because it wasn't that scary. This is sad. If those people were more open-minded they could have enjoyed what is fundamentally a good movie.
 

HStallion

Member
Oct 25, 2017
32,098
Just one Best Foreign film at the Golden Globes. Wonder if Bong Joon-oh can win Best Director.
 

Minamu

Member
Nov 18, 2017
927
Sweden
Thanks to this thread, I went in blind tonight, and I couldn't be any happier! What a really cool movie :D Since I also spent 3 weeks in Seoul this summer, it kinda felt a little bit like coming gome in a weird way.

I'm so gonna try to make Jjapaguri with sirloin later this week.

감사합니다

Edit: Reading about the ending now, because I was also slightly confused. The very last piece of dialogue was unsubbed for some reason for me. But I honestly am not agreeing with the director, which is a weird thing to say, but I still got the feeling that the ending was positive and hopeful. I didn't understand that the "dream sequence" was nothing but a fantasy at all. Sure, they were a bunch of loons, but it's perfectly viable that the circumstances could be life-altering and make the son pull himselves up and finish school and make that dream reality. I saw nothing that prevented this from ever happening. Maybe it's just my naivete or happy go lucky personality xD
 
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Dommo

Member
Oct 25, 2017
791
Australia
Thanks to this thread, I went in blind tonight, and I couldn't be any happier! What a really cool movie :D Since I also spent 3 weeks in Seoul this summer, it kinda felt a little bit like coming gome in a weird way.

I'm so gonna try to make Jjapaguri with sirloin later this week.

감사합니다

Edit: Reading about the ending now, because I was also slightly confused. The very last piece of dialogue was unsubbed for some reason for me. But I honestly am not agreeing with the director, which is a weird thing to say, but I still got the feeling that the ending was positive and hopeful. I didn't understand that the "dream sequence" was nothing but a fantasy at all. Sure, they were a bunch of loons, but it's perfectly viable that the circumstances could be life-altering and make the son pull himselves up and finish school and make that dream reality. I saw nothing that prevented this from ever happening. Maybe it's just my naivete or happy go lucky personality xD
The society the characters inhabit is what's preventing him from making his dreams a reality. Everything in the film is there to corroborate this depressing and sobering truth: the class division is too great and you are all but trapped in your rung in society. There are too many factors at play that keep poor families poor and rich families rich. It doesn't matter if you work hard or stay optimistic. A storm will come along and wash your entire plan away - a storm that is a mere amusement to families of means. Presumably university costs money, money their family never had and definitely doesn't now.

Despite all attempts to hustle and grind, the central characters are in a worse state than they were before the film began, and will presumably continue to fight for the scraps amongst other equally unlucky sods, while the rich look down upon the mess with upturned noses, content to keep the division as large as possible. The son's fate is almost entirely out of his hands. And so with all the optimism and bootstraps in the world, he'll likely never see an ounce of wealth, and with that, likely never see his father again.
 

Acquila

Member
Oct 26, 2017
1,085
I have a chance to see this. Is it scary? Are there jumpscares?

For reference, Sinister scared me so much that it left me feel uneasy for weeks.
 

Minamu

Member
Nov 18, 2017
927
Sweden
I have a chance to see this. Is it scary? Are there jumpscares?

For reference, Sinister scared me so much that it left me feel uneasy for weeks.
There are intense scenes, but not horror movie level of scary. And no jumpscares. I called it a drama comedy with lots of tension to my sister earlier. Defining it in a, or multiple genres, is spoilery in and of itself.

The society the characters inhabit is what's preventing him from making his dreams a reality. Everything in the film is there to corroborate this depressing and sobering truth: the class division is too great and you are all but trapped in your rung in society. There are too many factors at play that keep poor families poor and rich families rich. It doesn't matter if you work hard or stay optimistic. A storm will come along and wash your entire plan away - a storm that is a mere amusement to families of means. Presumably university costs money, money their family never had and definitely doesn't now.

Despite all attempts to hustle and grind, the central characters are in a worse state than they were before the film began, and will presumably continue to fight for the scraps amongst other equally unlucky sods, while the rich look down upon the mess with upturned noses, content to keep the division as large as possible. The son's fate is almost entirely out of his hands. And so with all the optimism and bootstraps in the world, he'll likely never see an ounce of wealth, and with that, likely never see his father again.
I know that's the message, and you made it clearer to me that you're right. I just didn't get that message from the movie at all. Highly depressing :/
 

Mifune

Member
Oct 30, 2017
469
Just saw it a second time. Not as funny when you know where it’s going. And where it’s going hits like a ton of bricks on rewatch.

This movie is a work of art.
 
Oct 26, 2017
3,525
I just saw the film. Loved it. Been thinking about it endlessly since I left the theatre.
Really really liked it, didn't quite love it. Not my favorite of Joon Ho's, but I definitely liked it more than Snowpiercer and Okja. I feel like stuff around the ending sequences didn't quite make sense and seemed a little forced , but theres so many amazing scenes and beats that I still really liked it overall. Can't wait to see it again actually.

Why the hell are there buttons for lights in a hidden bunker? Like I get some type of thing and that morse code would be a thought, but the main entryway lights? Also the suddenness of the narrative of the dad being a cockroach and thinking about the smell and then Park in the heat of all the chaos is worried about holding his nose to grab his car keys. Just kind of took me out of it.
WRT your spoilered complaint,
I took that to be a way for someone hiding in the bunker, during an emergency, having a way to contact someone on the outside.
 

Ernest

Member
Oct 25, 2017
2,709
So.Cal.
Went in blind as a bat. More funny than anything which I like. But the last act fell off a cliff.
7/10. Would rewatch
I'd agree with this.
Expectations are a bitch, and with the film having won the Palme D'or and already being a fan of Bong Joon-ho, my expectations were through the roof. If those two things didn't color my expectations, I probably would've like it more.
 

More_Badass

Member
Oct 25, 2017
17,521
Thanks to this thread, I went in blind tonight, and I couldn't be any happier! What a really cool movie :D Since I also spent 3 weeks in Seoul this summer, it kinda felt a little bit like coming gome in a weird way.

I'm so gonna try to make Jjapaguri with sirloin later this week.

감사합니다

Edit: Reading about the ending now, because I was also slightly confused. The very last piece of dialogue was unsubbed for some reason for me. But I honestly am not agreeing with the director, which is a weird thing to say, but I still got the feeling that the ending was positive and hopeful. I didn't understand that the "dream sequence" was nothing but a fantasy at all. Sure, they were a bunch of loons, but it's perfectly viable that the circumstances could be life-altering and make the son pull himselves up and finish school and make that dream reality. I saw nothing that prevented this from ever happening. Maybe it's just my naivete or happy go lucky personality xD
The family is in a much worse position now than at the start of the film, and the son was already the least sufficient/skilled of the four. That cut back to the apartment is the cold gut-punch of “oh, right, this is their reality”.
 

Acquila

Member
Oct 26, 2017
1,085
There are intense scenes, but not horror movie level of scary. And no jumpscares. I called it a drama comedy with lots of tension to my sister earlier. Defining it in a, or multiple genres, is spoilery in and of itself.

I know that's the message, and you made it clearer to me that you're right. I just didn't get that message from the movie at all. Highly depressing :/
I would never include it in the same category as Sinister.
You should be able to handle this with little to no problems, based on your post.
Sounds like suspense/thriller, but not slasher kind. I think I can do this, thanks.
 

Rover

Member
Oct 25, 2017
2,637
I kinda want to build a Lego model of the house.

Even the doorbell sound has something to it that sticks with you.
 
Mar 10, 2018
2,295
Just finished watching. It's a solid film, but I don't see what everyone's raving about. I would say it's above average.
 

Daffy Duck

The Fallen
Oct 25, 2017
8,340
I went in totally blind.....Well shit!

mid way through I wasn’t expecting to be blown away (it was good as things unfolded) then it happened and afterwards I’m left picking my jaw up off the floor.

That was phenomenal.
 
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