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Paying for parking at your job is bullshit

mrboo001

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,417
I had a job that required me to make trips out and about in the city with my own vehicle, and they still refused to give me any parking. I even asked if I could just take the bus and they said "no", that I wouldn't be able to fulfill my duties. It was a load of bullshit.
 

wads

Member
Oct 27, 2017
421
Lol at complaining at 65 per month. I would LOVE to have that option. Costs 250 per month at my company (Bay Area) and was 500/600 per month when I was in SF.
 

guiloahhhhh

Member
Oct 29, 2017
399
Lol at one job found out I had to do this (on the day I started working). That and many other reasons was why I would only work one day their. Nearly walked off the job but held on and called in the next day explaining that I'm better than that. No regrets
 

PaulloDEC

Member
Oct 25, 2017
3,047
Australia
The parking complex I used to park in currently charges 120 bucks a month for a covered park, a little less for the roof (where your car gets cooked to a crisp in the sun).

Nowadays I just park wherever is closest to the office/shadiest at any given time. I have to move my car every two hours to avoid tickets, but it doesn't cost me $1440 bucks a year, so that's nice.
 

A Grizzly Bear

The Fallen
Oct 27, 2017
507
$780 a year? I pay $420 CAD a month. I'd love to take transit but my commute would be 2 hours one way.

It sucks but it's not always as straight forward as giving free parking. The college I used to work for I had to pay. The cost was somewhat subsidized by the school and they lost money on all of the staff parking. There also wasn't enough spots for all staff so new people would get waitlisted. But US schools could be different.
 

mhayes86

Member
Oct 27, 2017
1,497
Virginia
Could you use paid parking to negotiate a higher salary? Some places do accept that (though they don't always offer it up front). Granted that sucks since you're getting taxed for a higher income when part of that is going towards parking.

I don't think you can deduct work expenses on taxes as of 2018, but I don't know for a fact if that includes parking for work.
 

Octodad

Member
Oct 26, 2017
1,807
My wife works in the medical field. There’s a few hospitals where highly paid medical professionals still have to pay for parking. I’m talking people making $200,000 - $500,000 a year, but the hospital still requires them to pay $2 a day to park.
 

Mulciber

Member
Aug 22, 2018
4,584
I saw thread title and thought, "yeah, I had to do that shit when working for a university" then read your first post. Good stuff. Not the paying, of course. That's shit.
 

Dali

Member
Oct 27, 2017
3,038
I have to pay for parking as well. The excuse I hear peddled around is it's standard (meaning all the other corporate headquarters downtown do it too). It's a pathetic excuse but at $50 a month (I think... I walk to work so I stopped paying for parking) it's cheaper than feeding meters throughout the day.
 

weekev

Member
Oct 25, 2017
2,999
I work in the UK, my parking costs would be £960 per year just to go to work. I have started cycling because fuck that.

edit thats about $1250 per year converted to dollars.
 

muteKi

Member
Oct 22, 2018
10,957
a sunken pirate ship
I worked at places where we had to use public garages and pay for it--at a lower validated price but still. idiotic.
I mean, that's not terrible, since full-day private parking is like a unicorn cyclops (rare, and probably a little horrifying if you actually saw it in real life), as long as it's full-day parking and, again, they don't have a facili--

The worst was an internship I had at a fairly small company in west Los Angeles. No transit access from my location to them that would take under 2.5 hours. They were located in an area with only paid parking around for blocks and blocks, and it all had 2 hr limits. Meaning you had to go out multiple times a day to move your car to a different spot. And if you were busy with something--on a call, writing something for a deadline, you know working for them--and blew the time window, the meter maids in the area were ruthless. So even though they reimbursed the $12/day of parking or whatever it was, I got hit with two $80 tickets during my time there. The cherry on top? They had parking spots on-site. There were just enough for the principal and core employees, plus two or three extra for clients/etc. But we typically got there hours before the principals and left after them too, and there were days where no clients were expected in, and we still weren't allowed to use the spots.
Oh yeah wow that is fucking inexcusable but y'all probably know how I feel about landlords in general
 

Tapiozona

Avenger
Oct 28, 2017
955
Now I know that those of you living in New York and such will balk, but I am starting work at a a major public university next week (actually my second time working there) and part of the new hire packet is that parking in the garage costs me $780 per year taken out of my paycheck.

Now this isn’t mandatory thank God, but it means I have to find free street parking three or four blocks away every day. I’m cheap enough to make this hike, but it’s super irritating especially in Arizona heat or flash floods. One of the perks of my current job was free parking in a garage.

Anyway I’m just venting. Fuck paying for parking for work.
Assuming you're talking about ASU. I promise you won't have to worry about flash floods and when the heat kicks in, school will be out leaving LOTS of free parking.

During the school year there's lots of options for off campus parking or you could even take the light rail since it passes straight through campus. You don't have to take it the full distance, just park one or two stops away and ride it onto campus.

Congrats on the new job. Could you not have tried to negotiate the parking in your salary?
 

Futureman

Member
Oct 26, 2017
4,313
Legit bullshit. I get a free bus pass at work so I never drive in, just take the bus.

I guess the only argument is if it were free, there would never be enough open spots for everyone. I know the parking passes at the university I work at are on a wait list.
 

GoldenEye 007

Roll Tide, Y'all!
Member
Oct 25, 2017
3,977
Texas
Sucks, but parking infrastructure costs money. Basic parking garages can hit $15-$20m to build. Who do we think is going to pay for it? And a university isn't really going to be able to get away with charging students to park, but letting faculty/staff park for free.
 

hoserx

Member
Oct 27, 2017
657
Ohio
I was offered a job at a radio station dowtown in the market I work in. It was a split shift, which sucks enough on its own, but having to pay to park twice a day...... finding a spot twice a day.......... I passed.
 

SirRugdumph

Member
Oct 27, 2017
72
I also work at a big university, and parking in the garage closest to my building is $1,300/year.

But, we can get annual bus passes for $50, so I just commute. Commuting takes longer than driving, but I save a ton of money in gas, not to mention not having to pay an arm and a leg just to park.
 

Elandyll

Avenger
Oct 25, 2017
4,397
Yep it does suck.
$60/ month, and it's only my School. Any other parking at the University I work at, gotta pay the hourly rate.

Frigin' robbery! >:(
 

MrMephistoX

Member
Oct 25, 2017
2,388
Slightly better than working in downtown SF like me. There is no parking and we’re encouraged to use public transport or Uber through a pre-tax account.
 

Vapelord

Member
Oct 27, 2017
898
Montreal
I take public transit but some are dropping well over $250 a month on parking around work here. The ones around $250 are also trash, they jam as many cars as they can into the lot. They try to stagger them so yours is available to drive out when you normally leave, any other time your waiting 10-15 mins while they have to move 5-6 cars in some sort of car Tetris game to get yours out of the lot. Easily $350 plus if your not interested in playing that game.
 

btags

Member
Oct 26, 2017
711
Rochester NY
Yup, I am a graduate student and have to pay for my parking. It is ridiculous especially considering it is an open lot (not a garage) and I am in an area that gets heavy snow. Better yet, in one of the parking lots, they have this stupid three layer deep parking spot system, which is arranged as follows:

Basically, if you are in the red spots, you have to have a box that allows parking attendents to access to your keys so they can move your car if someone in the middle yellow spots need to leave or get in.
 

Perfect Chaos

Member
Oct 25, 2017
479
Charlottesville, VA, USA
My girlfriend's last job was like that. The office was downtown on a walking mall, so of course parking is limited, outside of paid parking garages a block or two away. She asked her boss why they didn't pay for their employees' parking, and the answer she got was that "it would be unfair to the employees who live nearby and walk".
 

SpitztheGreat

Member
May 16, 2019
1,437
As a city planner, this is an example of many things that we do wrong with planning our built environments; but it's also an example of choices having negative consequences.

Our built environments do not take into account enough transit-oriented development. We rely on fragmented mass transit with questionable efficiency, while our road network creeps out in unplanned and unregulated ways. Our new built environments need to do much more to orient new development around key transportation hubs, both for the use of mass transit and the more efficient use of automobiles, by increasing density and including mixed-use development.

But we as consumers need to make smarter decisions about where we buy. A million considerations go into where we decide to live, so I don't mean to call the OP out, but people in general do a poor job of considering elements related to their commute/transportation. Too often the size and cost of the house are the primary (or only) consideration. People want to get as much house as they can for their budget, and that often pushes them into new development, or into areas that are decentralized. While cost is a critical consideration, we as human beings need more than just the biggest house for our budget. By choosing these homes, we incentivize the further development of decentralized residential, so we're feeding the beast. The result is miserable commutes and a frustration that we get charged for parking in our dense urban areas. Consumers need to be more holistic in their approach towards housing, adding the commute to their list of priorities and working the costs of a commute into their budget. Consumers also need to factor in their time spent commuting/being stuck in traffic; is that four bedroom house with 2.5 baths worth being stuck in traffic 45 minutes a day, five days a week, for years? Regardless of the answer, you at least need to ask the question.
 
OP
OP
makonero

makonero

Member
Oct 27, 2017
2,077
Assuming you're talking about ASU. I promise you won't have to worry about flash floods and when the heat kicks in, school will be out leaving LOTS of free parking.

During the school year there's lots of options for off campus parking or you could even take the light rail since it passes straight through campus. You don't have to take it the full distance, just park one or two stops away and ride it onto campus.

Congrats on the new job. Could you not have tried to negotiate the parking in your salary?
I didn’t know the cost until after the salary was set. It was like, oh yeah btw parking costs a ton.

Less free parking spaces downtown, which is where I’m working.
 

ElephantShell

10,000,000
Member
Oct 25, 2017
4,620
My spouse is a nurse. Staff parking at the hospital has a waitlist three years long. She has to park in the regular patient parkade and pay $6 per shift. Sucks big time.
 

Bigkrev

Member
Oct 25, 2017
4,986
I'm starting a new job shortly where I have to decide if I want to...

A.) pay $200 a month to park, plus gas/wear and tear on the vehicle
B.) pay $240 a month to take a train, and stay at work late each day cause the train home happens at 5:45 (and if I miss that, I have to kill another hour

I'm coming from a small school in the suburbs where parking is free, to a downtown in the city school. It sucks, but thats the cost of not wanting to live in a city.
 

Doomguy Fieri

Member
Nov 3, 2017
1,432
As a city planner, this is an example of many things that we do wrong with planning our built environments; but it's also an example of choices having negative consequences.

Our built environments do not take into account enough transit-oriented development. We rely on fragmented mass transit with questionable efficiency, while our road network creeps out in unplanned and unregulated ways. Our new built environments need to do much more to orient new development around key transportation hubs, both for the use of mass transit and the more efficient use of automobiles, by increasing density and including mixed-use development.

But we as consumers need to make smarter decisions about where we buy. A million considerations go into where we decide to live, so I don't mean to call the OP out, but people in general do a poor job of considering elements related to their commute/transportation. Too often the size and cost of the house are the primary (or only) consideration. People want to get as much house as they can for their budget, and that often pushes them into new development, or into areas that are decentralized. While cost is a critical consideration, we as human beings need more than just the biggest house for our budget. By choosing these homes, we incentivize the further development of decentralized residential, so we're feeding the beast. The result is miserable commutes and a frustration that we get charged for parking in our dense urban areas. Consumers need to be more holistic in their approach towards housing, adding the commute to their list of priorities and working the costs of a commute into their budget. Consumers also need to factor in their time spent commuting/being stuck in traffic; is that four bedroom house with 2.5 baths worth being stuck in traffic 45 minutes a day, five days a week, for years? Regardless of the answer, you at least need to ask the question.
Truth.

Jobs don't cover car payments or gas used getting to work. If the only parking nearby is paid parking, you pay to park.

BTW, all parking should be paid parking.
 

Darren Lamb

Member
Dec 1, 2017
248
They used to heavily subsidize parking here, about 8 dollars a week in one of the priciest markets in the country. Next year it’s moving to 10 per day, max of 150/month, and supposed to be market rate in the next few years (350/month I think)

People are not pleased, but traffic here is abysmal, and they will pay 265 for transit costs. I feel bad for people who live farther away but we can’t keep incentivizing car travel.
 

Jazzman

Member
Oct 25, 2017
145
Used to pay $220/month ($2,640 a year) to park downtown as I refused to take the bus.

Got a promotion and the new place offers electrified parking for $65 a year which was like a bonus promotion in and of itself.
 

lt519

Member
Oct 25, 2017
3,723
That sucks OP, I'd be pissed and out of principal street park and walk. I pay or my nanny's parking since she drives our city and it's $100 a month.

Our uni had teachers get busted for counterfeit parking passes. Should be covered if you work there and have to park there.
This was really common at our university. There were a ton of fake templates up on DC++, basically everyone got a boot at some point in their 4 years, but it was still cheaper than paying the parking. They already were asking for $45,000 for tuition and board, mine as well ask for another $1000 in parking, pricks.
 

Chopchop

Member
Oct 25, 2017
6,561
That's bullshit.

I remember that my uni professors had to pay for their own parking. I always thought that was fucked up.