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People are 'ghosting' at work, and it's driving companies crazy

Nerdyone

Banned
Member
Oct 28, 2017
1,723
woah woah woah we cant expect these masters degree in HR people to know about properly contacting mass amounts of people
every hr person is a 80yr old grandparent who starts crying and breaks down when they have 5 or more people to reject for a position
think about THEIR needs ffs

I expect them to contact the .01% who actually get called into an interview and then didnt get it
i DONT expect them (and NO ONE does) to contact every application sent in if no prior communication was established
The people applying to those 100k applicant positions are also mass firing off resumes into the wind, and dont give a fuck if one didnt reply
but dont call someone in and have them go thru 2 rounds of interview and then treat them like some anonymous unsolicited email who shouldn't expect even a template rejection
Our applicant tracking software (iCIMS) sends out declination emails to all candidates after a hire is made. It's pretty standard stuff.

As for the resumes, it takes time to go through all of them. Typically when you have candidates submitted you typically pause or slow down the review of new applicants
 

Nerdyone

Banned
Member
Oct 28, 2017
1,723
Referrals are meaningless. Like, I am on at least 5 people's referral list. I just make shit up to make them look good. I am waiting for the company to throw a trick question in there to catch the lies but they never do.
Your talking about a reference, recruiters want referrals. References are worthless
 

Nerdyone

Banned
Member
Oct 28, 2017
1,723
It's so easy to contact people that companies who don't send out rejection emails are consciously choosing to ghost.
Not sure. Many companies don't have recruiters. Instead they relie on HRBP/Generalist or the hiring manager to do the recruitment. If they aren't trained or aren't using best practices vthis could be why
 
Oct 27, 2017
1,803
It's just rather weird that you hold employees to higher standards than employers.

Your example is also a blatant false equivalence. What is cited in the article is applicants not responding to employers during the application process, ie before an offer has been made, which is exactly what employers have been doing to applicants without being held accountable for ages.

What you're saying is that you're extremely bothered by applicants not responding to employers during the application process but you're not that bothered by employers not responding to applicants during the application process.
Not responding? Before the offer stage? Eh, no. From the OP, did you just stop reading or what?

Some accept jobs, only to not appear for the first day of work, no reason given, of course. Instead of formally quitting, enduring a potentially awkward conversation with a manager, some employees leave and never return.
I don't give a shit if someone doesn't respond to an email. I stick by what I said above for the behaviour in the quote.
 
Nov 3, 2017
5,730
Portland, OR
Not responding? Before the offer stage? Eh, no. From the OP, did you just stop reading or what?



I don't give a shit if someone doesn't respond to an email. I stick by what I said above for the behaviour in the quote.
Then are you referring to employees who leave without notice or explanation in the quote you provided?

Or are you purely singling out employees not showing up on the first day and none of the other instances referenced in the article?
 
Oct 27, 2017
1,803
Then are you referring to employees who leave without notice or explanation in the quote you provided?

Or are you purely singling out employees not showing up on the first day and none of the other instances referenced in the article?
I'm talking about the behaviour I quoted, I've literally just said that. Anyway you seem to enjoy reading whatever you want to read so carry on.
 

Pet

Member
Oct 25, 2017
2,706
SoCal
I didn't miss your underlying implication at all.
You have consistently been missing every implication from everyone responding to you, sweetheart.

I was told I was lazy by my dad, but never did I think newer generation would be even lazier. I was very naive.
^------------- Let me just re-iterate once again that your response to someone criticizing this was "LOL BUT I WENT TO STANFORD."



What are you going to do when someone who went to Harvard tells you you're wrong? Fold to their better degree? lol
 
Jan 2, 2019
87
You have consistently been missing every implication from everyone responding to you, sweetheart.



^------------- Let me just re-iterate once again that your response to someone criticizing this was "LOL BUT I WENT TO STANFORD."



What are you going to do when someone who went to Harvard tells you you're wrong? Fold to their better degree? lol
Again, I did not miss any implication. I'm just having fun. If I had responded directly, then the outcome of your response would have been too obvious. I simply wanted to see where you would take this after my completely irrelevant response. You see, I'm done with my work for the day so I am here looking to read anything remotely interesting. So far, your responses have been disappointing.
 

Pet

Member
Oct 25, 2017
2,706
SoCal
Again, I did not miss any implication. I'm just having fun. If I had responded directly, then the outcome of your response would have been too obvious. I simply wanted to see where you would take this after my completely irrelevant response. You see, I'm done with my work for the day so I am here looking to read anything remotely interesting. So far, your responses have been disappointing.
If you're going to make illogical appeal to authority arguments, expect pushback. If you're going to be tacky and attempt to flaunt your degree (seriously, who does that?) as any sort of.... argument/basis, try to own it instead defaulting to "lol I was just trolling." No one likes someone who can't take responsibility for their own actions.

Also in regards to the bolded: uhhhh wow. Don't tip that fedora too hard, it might fall off your head.
 
Oct 30, 2017
79
Again, I did not miss any implication. I'm just having fun. If I had responded directly, then the outcome of your response would have been too obvious. I simply wanted to see where you would take this after my completely irrelevant response. You see, I'm done with my work for the day so I am here looking to read anything remotely interesting. So far, your responses have been disappointing.
Alright, alright. Who did you bribe to get into Stanford?
 

NervousXtian

Banned
Member
Oct 27, 2017
1,595
We get this so much more these days, probably starting in the last 2 years. People quit by just ghosting us completely. Almost always younger people who do it, they just seem adverse to confrontation. It's such a lame way to quit, but whatever.. I'm just Gen X'er bitching about the new generation like my parents did about us.

On the hiring front, we contact everyone who applies at least with a call, and if we don't contact we e-mail. We typically offer on the spot these days, as opposed to waiting... then again I'm hiring entry level. A lot of times they say yes, then ghost us after sending paperwork. Or do paperwork and never show or contact for orientation. It's so common these days we don't even blink an eye over it. It's almost expected we are ghosted by over half the offers we give out.
 
Nov 13, 2017
4,152
We get this so much more these days, probably starting in the last 2 years. People quit by just ghosting us completely. Almost always younger people who do it, they just seem adverse to confrontation. It's such a lame way to quit, but whatever.. I'm just Gen X'er bitching about the new generation like my parents did about us.

On the hiring front, we contact everyone who applies at least with a call, and if we don't contact we e-mail. We typically offer on the spot these days, as opposed to waiting... then again I'm hiring entry level. A lot of times they say yes, then ghost us after sending paperwork. Or do paperwork and never show or contact for orientation. It's so common these days we don't even blink an eye over it. It's almost expected we are ghosted by over half the offers we give out.
Entry level, I can see, especially if it's mainly younger people. Though I'd think a large part of your hiring process would be focused on weeding out the flakes. Do they have the option of going home and thinking about it, or do they have to either accept or reject the offer while they're there?
 
Oct 27, 2017
4,522
Companies should be more aware that in general, applying for jobs suck, because it is very difficult to read what's happening in the process. Getting hired too quick or an interview lasting weeks is always a brow riser, and that shit causes a lot of anxiety, and if they dont care about that now, they probably wont care either when I'm working for them.
 
Jan 2, 2019
87
If you're going to make illogical appeal to authority arguments, expect pushback. If you're going to be tacky and attempt to flaunt your degree (seriously, who does that?) as any sort of.... argument/basis, try to own it instead defaulting to "lol I was just trolling." No one likes someone who can't take responsibility for their own actions.

Also in regards to the bolded: uhhhh wow. Don't tip that fedora too hard, it might fall off your head.
Fedora does look good on me.
 

NervousXtian

Banned
Member
Oct 27, 2017
1,595
Entry level, I can see, especially if it's mainly younger people. Though I'd think a large part of your hiring process would be focused on weeding out the flakes. Do they have the option of going home and thinking about it, or do they have to either accept or reject the offer while they're there?
Oh for sure they can mull it over. We never used to offer on the spot except rare occasions in the past. It's just almost necessary now since the market is so tight.. if we don't jump we lose people at an even higher rate.

As to weeding out flakes, it's tough.. I've been hiring for almost 20 years. Some of the tells of bad employees are still the same, but a lot have changed. Also, with entry level you have a lot of weirdos and sketchy people, but some of those people turn out as fine employees and the normal great interviewers end up fucking batshit crazy and major HR concerns. If fucks with you.

Then again, with such low unemployment, we take flyers on people all the time.
 
Oct 25, 2017
6,685
Oh for sure they can mull it over. We never used to offer on the spot except rare occasions in the past. It's just almost necessary now since the market is so tight.. if we don't jump we lose people at an even higher rate.

As to weeding out flakes, it's tough.. I've been hiring for almost 20 years. Some of the tells of bad employees are still the same, but a lot have changed. Also, with entry level you have a lot of weirdos and sketchy people, but some of those people turn out as fine employees and the normal great interviewers end up fucking batshit crazy and major HR concerns. If fucks with you.

Then again, with such low unemployment, we take flyers on people all the time.
I can see the reasons for filter failures.

A lot of great interviewees have lots of practice at it - because they are out of work more often for "reasons". They accept low salaries, which attracts employers, and tell them exactly what they want to hear. Then, once they get in, they reveal themselves as primadonnas.

People who have been at one job for like 10 years are not great interviewers because they're used to being at work, not job hunting. Generally those are the people you want - loyal, dedicated people who would hold a single job all their lives if they could. But, they are also more expensive because of their dedicated salary history and regular pay raises.

In the end, you get what you pay for and you lose what you won't increase the pay for.
 
Last edited:

NervousXtian

Banned
Member
Oct 27, 2017
1,595
I can see the reasons for filter failures.

A lot of great interviewees have lots of practice at it - because they are out of work more often for "reasons". They accept low salaries, which attracts employers, and tell them exactly what they want to hear. Then, once they get in, they reveal themselves as primadonnas.

People who have been at one job for like 10 years are not great interviewers because they're used to being at work, not job hunting. Generally those are the people you want - loyal, dedicated people who would hold a single job all their lives if they could. But, they are also more expensive because of their dedicated salary history and regular pay raises.

In the end, you get what you pay for and you lose what you won't increase the pay for.
Well, we typically get shit because we pay shit. Didn't used to be that way, but new owners and all that... they believe we can polish any turd into a diamond. Problem is, most turds are still always going to be turds. The few we polish move on where they can get rewarded for their work.

My fault for staying here, but been doing it so long I'm too lazy and not motivated enough to move on. Though this last 12 months has been trying...
 
Nov 6, 2017
2,177
We get this so much more these days, probably starting in the last 2 years. People quit by just ghosting us completely. Almost always younger people who do it, they just seem adverse to confrontation. It's such a lame way to quit, but whatever.. I'm just Gen X'er bitching about the new generation like my parents did about us.
Yeah, I'm clearly from a different generation too. If somebody didn't show up for work there would be legit concern. Maybe they were in a car accident or something. You know, sometimes people actually do care about others.

If it's a case of "I quit because fuck you", then just say that and it's done. A basic text is all that is needed. At least everybody knows why they were a no show. There might actually be workmates who actually care about other workmates and want to know why. A cold hearted ghosting is just rude and inconsiderate.
 
Oct 25, 2017
4,207
China
She had one person cancel 10 minutes before she was supposed to be there because she "was extremely ill" yet when she checked the person's Instagram, they were out and about in the city perfectly fine. Like why not just say you are not interested in the position anymore? Needless to say, my gf did not call her back.
Pretty shitty of an employer to go snooping through someone's social media. Like why not just accept she called in sick?
 
Nov 15, 2017
3,212
Pretty shitty of an employer to go snooping through someone's social media. Like why not just accept she called in sick?
How is that shitty when they provide there social media on their resumes for their portfolio? Also if you don't think that potential employers aren't looking at your social media accounts then I hate to break it to ya.
 

Pet

Member
Oct 25, 2017
2,706
SoCal
Yeah, I'm clearly from a different generation too. If somebody didn't show up for work there would be legit concern. Maybe they were in a car accident or something. You know, sometimes people actually do care about others.

If it's a case of "I quit because fuck you", then just say that and it's done. A basic text is all that is needed. At least everybody knows why they were a no show. There might actually be workmates who actually care about other workmates and want to know why. A cold hearted ghosting is just rude and inconsiderate.
Yeah TBH I don't get ghosting jobs, but generally you're not supposed to ghost white collar jobs. It's poor etiquette.

Pretty shitty of an employer to go snooping through someone's social media. Like why not just accept she called in sick?
Snooping through social media is super weird. But, I have heard that a lot of stylists and people in those fields tend to be REALLY flaky, for some reason.
 
Oct 25, 2017
142
How is that shitty when they provide there social media on their resumes for their portfolio? Also if you don't think that potential employers aren't looking at your social media accounts then I hate to break it to ya.
its one thing to require a portfolio. its another to go through someone's social media account and make a judgement call. also, so what if she didn't wanna show, it was technically a lose-lose situation for her. call in sick or say she didn't wanna take the interview that day.
 
Nov 15, 2017
3,212
its one thing to require a portfolio. its another to go through someone's social media account and make a judgement call. also, so what if she didn't wanna show, it was technically a lose-lose situation for her. call in sick or say she didn't wanna take the interview that day.
Like I said, if you don't think companies are already doing this then you're in for a rude awakening. If the person didn't want to have employers look at their personal social media then she should have provided a business only account. You all are acting as if my girlfriend searched for her profile on her own, she was just reviewing her portfolio (which was provided on her resume) before the interview and the person happened to call right when she was doing so. Also, that day she was baffled that out of 5 scheduled interviews, she had 3 no call no shows, 1 call-in sick and only 1 who bothered to show up but was completely unprofessional.
 
Oct 30, 2017
3,241
Miami, FL
Basically, the attitude you should have as a job seeker is keep looking and interviewing until you get an offer you want.

Too many just sit and wait. That's not productive. Companies are not doing that either. They're interviewing multiple candidates. Take the same approach. Getting ghosted sucks. But I just find it funny seeing companies now complain when the shoe is on the other foot.
I get that really. I sent like...30 last year? For only 1 to offer great feedback
 
Companies should be more aware that in general, applying for jobs suck, because it is very difficult to read what's happening in the process. Getting hired too quick or an interview lasting weeks is always a brow riser, and that shit causes a lot of anxiety, and if they dont care about that now, they probably wont care either when I'm working for them.
Getting hired too quick is a huge red flag. I won’t accept an offer anymore without an interview. I’m interviewing them as much as they’re interviewing me. Got burned once, not again. In a single interview I could have diagnosed a list of things that made it a poor fit.

Plus places that hire quick also fire quick.
 
Oct 25, 2017
3,374
Seattle
but dont call someone in and have them go thru 2 rounds of interview and then treat them like some anonymous unsolicited email who shouldn't expect even a template rejection
If I was rejected after 2 interviews I'd rather not have the awkward phone call.

To each their own; but beyond not really caring about the principals of it all I'm aware I'm not all that significant to the people I show up to interview with. This is not some established "relationship" it's a person I may possibly talk to twice in my life and then never again. Or maybe I'll talk to them those 2 times and then spend 10 years working with them and be the godfather to their children. I don't know, I just met them, and I'm well aware they are probably busy as shit and might have interviewed 10 people in the past week.
 
Jan 31, 2018
1,536
Pretty shitty of an employer to go snooping through someone's social media. Like why not just accept she called in sick?
Because people lie all the time and abuse something meant for people to actually be ill? As a manager I get lied to constantly and it really sucks. People think calling out is ok and it’s harmless but if we didn’t need you at your scheduled time we wouldn’t have scheduled you/employ you. It’s rude, hurts the company, and hurts other employees. Unless you’re geneuinely sick be an adult and handle your responsibilities.

If someone calls out more than once a month I usually fire them unless documented. If it’s a real emergency/hardship then I never fire people. I even give people rides that live 40 minutes away because her engine block cracked and she didn’t have a car for 2 weeks.
 

Nerdyone

Banned
Member
Oct 28, 2017
1,723
Because people lie all the time and abuse something meant for people to actually be ill? As a manager I get lied to constantly and it really sucks. People think calling out is ok and it’s harmless but if we didn’t need you at your scheduled time we wouldn’t have scheduled you/employ you. It’s rude, hurts the company, and hurts other employees. Unless you’re geneuinely sick be an adult and handle your responsibilities.

If someone calls out more than once a month I usually fire them unless documented. If it’s a real emergency/hardship then I never fire people. I even give people rides that live 40 minutes away because her engine block cracked and she didn’t have a car for 2 weeks.
If someone is calling out once a month and hast the PTO or sick time to cover it, and is getting their job done, leave them be. People have a lot of issues and we need to be flexible.
 
Jan 31, 2018
1,536
If someone is calling out once a month and hast the PTO or sick time to cover it, and is getting their job done, leave them be. People have a lot of issues and we need to be flexible.
Sorry but no. Calling out once a month is ridiculous. By being absent you’re literally not getting the job done. It’s weird I’m 39 and somehow have managed to not need to call out constantly and like I was just saying calling out bc people feel like it happens constantly. It’s about 50/50 between truth and lie.
 
Oct 27, 2017
430
Imagine sticking up for corporations. Imagine sticking up for corporations and using words like decency, integrity in the same sentence.
 

NervousXtian

Banned
Member
Oct 27, 2017
1,595
BTW, the reason a lot of employers don't call to tell someone they aren't going to hire them is it's an awkward short call because legally you have to watch what you say as an employer, so anything more than "Sorry, we aren't interested in hiring you at this time" is really saying too much. A denial e-mail is a nice thing to do at least.. but an employer doesn't owe an explanation to anyone applying.
 

GoldenEye 007

Roll Tide, Y'all!
Member
Oct 25, 2017
2,728
Texas
BTW, the reason a lot of employers don't call to tell someone they aren't going to hire them is it's an awkward short call because legally you have to watch what you say as an employer, so anything more than "Sorry, we aren't interested in hiring you at this time" is really saying too much. A denial e-mail is a nice thing to do at least.. but an employer doesn't owe an explanation to anyone applying.
And that’s fine. But they can stop crying over employees returning the favor.
 

entremet

User Requested Ban
Member
Oct 26, 2017
13,066
BTW, the reason a lot of employers don't call to tell someone they aren't going to hire them is it's an awkward short call because legally you have to watch what you say as an employer, so anything more than "Sorry, we aren't interested in hiring you at this time" is really saying too much. A denial e-mail is a nice thing to do at least.. but an employer doesn't owe an explanation to anyone applying.
That's cool, so don't complain about candidates ghosting. Again, I've been ghosted by employers tons. Everyone does, but I always appreciate when employers tell me they went with someone else. A simple email is fine.

Don't complain about the courtesy contract when you never held you end of the bargain.
 
Oct 27, 2017
1,468
United States
Imagine sticking up for corporations. Imagine sticking up for corporations and using words like decency, integrity in the same sentence.
Corporations are made up of people, your coworkers. People like you. Imagine someone standing up for you. That's decency and integrity. People work at these places. That's who you hurt when you ghost.
 
Oct 25, 2017
444
Something that I did started encouraging others to do (after I had a friend have a terrible job search) is to leave negative reviews on glassdoor for companies who ghost you. Ghosting them in kind doesn't really add a lot of value and can have negative repercussion because people talk to each other. If a candidate ghosts two or three companies, word is going to travel and it could really have a negative impact on getting a position you would actually want.