People who walk with their dogs unleashed

Koo

Member
Dec 10, 2017
1,723
Whatever dude. Just realize that if you are legitimately interested in minimizing any danger to yourself or loved ones, yelling and lashing out at a dog has a high chance of being taken the wrong way by a dog. It could look like an invitation to play. I’m just saying read the fuckin’ room. A loose wild unfixed staffie bearing down on you is obviously cause for alarm; you kick a socialized border collie because it wants to greet you, I’m sorry you’re a lunatic.
It's not really trained if it's running toward me is it? You're a lunatic for believing people should treat all strange dogs as automatically friendly.
 

Ferrs

Avenger
Oct 26, 2017
7,957
I don't care if your dog has a military training degree or whatever bullshit, if you take out your dog unleashed you're a colossal ass.
 

aznpxdd

Member
Oct 25, 2017
515
Shocker this is the 2nd dog and now 3rd that I've trained this way that I haven't had any "horrible" experience yet, gee i dunno maybe ive just been lucky for 13 years or possibly I know what the fuck I'm doing ? If my dog who is literally a foot from the back of my heel 90% of the time can get bit by another dog then it would've been bit on a leash too, when I stop he stops and sits; and he is always within reach if need to scoop down and pick him up.

Plus he's a 6 pound POMERANIAN, who I've had people ASK me to bring him to birthday party for 7 and 8 year old's because he's so well behaved , but yeah I shouldn't let him off the leash because he's not trained. Yeah maybe a small dog can get nasty with you, and its a pain in the ass, but gtfo out of here if you think I'm ever going to be scared for my life of a chihuahua, or a shiatsu.

Not to mention the fact that you are assuming a lot about where I am/what I'm doing. Most of the time I have them in bike paths, state parks, or wildlife trails/marshes where I can literally go an hour without running into someone, I'm not just walking him in the middle of the street. My dog is trained enough to walk on the side of a busy road, sits when I tell him to sit, and stays at my heel the entire time.

Why dont you tell people with 6 and 7 year olds who walk up to dogs randomly in the street to leash their fucking children, I once had a full grown collie, and kids would just walk up to her and stick their face right in front of hers, while she was on a leash; guess I mistrained her because she never did anything and would let kids hang off her neck.

Mandate kids 8 and under being on a leash and then maybe we'll talk; Because I know my dog listens better than children at that age and they can walk free.
Ugh...more personal stories of how good of a boy your dog is. I mean where's the common sense? No shit you can keep it unleashed when the dog is invited to a birthday on a private property.

Also we talking about keeping children on leashes now? The fuck.
 

WetWaffle

Member
Oct 25, 2017
360
Any dog tries to bite me, I'm kicking it till it runs away. Few months ago, was taking a walk at night, dog got out of it's lawn and started chasing me. Was small like a chihuahua, and wouldn't back down, chasing me, occasional lunging, stopping and growling then chasing again for two streets. I had the urge to punt it like a football, but I didn't, it gave up and went back.
 
Nov 5, 2017
9,085
Would you say taking my dog to a forest and then taking of the leash is fine. I guess Americans don't have many forests as we do in Scotland..
 

StallionDan

Member
Oct 25, 2017
3,883
On your private property or at a dog park. If your dog needs the exercise off a leash and you can't provide either of those for him then you shouldn't have a dog.

Honestly half of it isn't protecting the world from your dogs, it's protecting your dogs from the world.
Wtf is a dog park. A park just for dogs to run about in? I'm pretty sure they don't exist here. If you want your dog to have exercise you're going somewhere public
 

Westbahnhof

The Fallen
Oct 27, 2017
4,698
Austria
Trained service dogs(or more simply put "all service dogs") in Austria get to walk around without a leash on many mandatory leash areas, and that's pretty good.
Our neighborhood allows walking of dogs without a leash, and that's good too.

Now, obviously, you gotta respect the rules. And control you animal.
The situation OP describes is absolutely fucked up, and the owner is a moron.
 

elseanio

Avenger
Oct 30, 2017
125
My dog has to be on the lead at all times, and I HATE getting into situations where some other dog runs over and is up in his face. Thankfully this doesn't happen to often when just walking around streets, it tends to be owners who have their dog in a garden with a gate open.
 
Oct 31, 2017
4,040
I know it sounds horrible but don't be afraid to kick dogs. Unleashed pets are basically indistinguishable from wild animals, you don't know if they have owners and are trained. They could be feral and/or have viruses and could bite you or your family. Fucking kick them away.

Maybe lady would care if her dogs get injured?
Go kick yourself for writing this post, dipshit
 

aznpxdd

Member
Oct 25, 2017
515
My dog has to be on the lead at all times, and I HATE getting into situations where some other dog runs over and is up in his face. Thankfully this doesn't happen to often when just walking around streets, it tends to be owners who have their dog in a garden with a gate open.
Seriously...the fact that a lot of owners don't understand this is crazy. Your dog is a good dog that listens to your "training" until...it doesn't. I love my 3 dogs but they are animals after all.
 

John Caboose

Member
Oct 26, 2017
797
Sweden
Trained service dogs(or more simply put "all service dogs") in Austria get to walk around without a leash on many mandatory leash areas, and that's pretty good.
Our neighborhood allows walking of dogs without a leash, and that's good too.

Now, obviously, you gotta respect the rules. And control you animal.
The situation OP describes is absolutely fucked up, and the owner is a moron.
Precisely. In Sweden the general rule is that you need to be able to control your dog as if it was on a leash. As we all know, humans do shitty things all the time, including not taking care of, or controlling/handling, their pet as they should. This doesn’t just apply to dogs of course.

My favorite is the reindeer that hung out outside the shop in a small town kicking people coming in and out. The owner had to come and get it. 😂



 

DeltaRed

Member
Apr 27, 2018
2,217
There are a couple of big (and very busy) parks near where I live and I would say 60% of the dogs I see in there are off leash and I've never seen any problems, there are no signs about it. In that sort of area or some trail walk I think it's completely normal if the dog is used to it and the owner is responsible.
 

Fray

Member
Oct 28, 2017
69
Fray i live in a rural area as well - I run through a provincial park a few times a week and I encounter a lot of loose dogs. I like dogs and have never had an issue because it’s quiet there in the mornings and there is a kind of understanding since most people here have dogs. I get what you are saying. I think most posters here are thinking about in the city/suburbs where the population density is much higher and leash laws are really necessary.
I do wish dog owners had to be licensed. I hate how cavalier people can be with their dogs. But you report it. You don’t attack a dog. It is nonsensical to lash out hoping to not be bitten - you are asking for that to happen if you kick a dog.
My take on this whole thread is it's nothing more than an example of differing perceptions between people in rural communities vs more urban centres. I am sure country of origin plays a part just due to sheer density of populations, as you had also pointed out.
It seems to me most small town people are more on the relaxed side of things probably due to us not only having so fucking much wide open land all around us, but also our awareness of the wildlife around us too. There is a comfort level all the space affords us.
Now on the flip side a dog off leash walking through a city centre in say Toronto, Montreal... or I dunno New York or something would probably be a bigger concern and probably for good reason. I could imagine in that scenario an off leash dog has the potential to create a lot of chaos out of fear, excitement, being overwhelmed or more likely, other humans not knowing how to approach a dog. Hell my dog is obedient I can - and have -literally put a steak in front of her, told her to stay and left the room and she will not eat it until I give the command. Even knowing that she is the goodest girl ever (I'm not wrong, fight me!) I would never dream of bringing her into that environment off leash - Not at all implying you would btw, just speaking to explain my point.

I guess what I am trying to say is I believe this thread, all the dissenting opinions, shit even the hostility that has been displayed just underlines a difference in opinion people have and hold due to the areas they live. I don't actually think anybody is wrong at all, except for when people emotions have gotten the best of them. It's just people are situationally different.

Fuck this is the longest post I have ever written on this site and I have been a member for years, Haha. I am sure I rambled my ass off.

Tl;dr - Dogs off leash in rural areas: good.
Dogs off leash in urban areas: bad.
 

LL_Decitrig

Member
Oct 27, 2017
8,929
Sunderland
In my area it's quite normal to let your dog off the leash on the beach. Not all beaches are open for dogs, though. There are other relatively secluded areas inland where it's considered safe, too.

We have a rescue greyhound, and it took over a year before we trusted her off the leash, because as a breed they're not renowned for their recall. She's gentle and goofy, and fortunately she's not aggressive in the presence of small animals.

We watch out for potentially problematic situations and leash her when necessary. This applies particularly when there are children on the same beach. You can't be too careful.
 

LL_Decitrig

Member
Oct 27, 2017
8,929
Sunderland
Wtf is a dog park. A park just for dogs to run about in? I'm pretty sure they don't exist here. If you want your dog to have exercise you're going somewhere public
There is a dog park a few miles from where I live. It's basically like a children's play area, but for dogs. If I didn't have access to the local beaches and other suitable areas I might take our dog there.
 

MadMike

Member
Oct 27, 2017
826
I walk my dog to the park every day, and there's often some dumbass out there with no leash on their dog. It's always kind of scary, and I try to keep my distance.

People that do this are unbelievably stupid. You can't predict how a dog is going to react in unexpected situations. I've walked by countless dogs, on leashes, that suddenly turn aggressive when we walk by. How's that unleashed dog going to react when some asshole untrained dog starts growling, barking, and pulling?
 
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John Kowalski

Member
Oct 27, 2017
7,081
I see people walking their dogs without leashes all the time in the city. Never really had a problem with them, but it's super scary as a driver. I don't know how the owners are comfortable leaving their dogs to roam freely near moving cars.

I only ever used a leash on my dog when he was sick and I had to be sure if what he was doing outside. Otherwise he was pretty much free to leave the house and come as he pleased. But I live in the middle of fucking nowhere with really no one he could bother.
 

sapien85

Member
Nov 8, 2017
2,083
Happens in my neighborhood all the time. There's a cop who lives on the corner who did this all the time. Several times had close calls between my dog and his dogs. Hasn't happened in a while thankfully.
 

Koo

Member
Dec 10, 2017
1,723
Surely there is a compromise somewhere between kicking an unleashed, approaching dog and assuming it's friendly.
The compromise is either leashing your dog or training it well enough it will never run at a stranger.

I'm surprised not wanting to get assaulted by a dog is such a controversial opinion, but *shrug*; guess there must be a subsection of the populace who love getting bitten by strange animals.
 

LL_Decitrig

Member
Oct 27, 2017
8,929
Sunderland
My friend had to kick an unleashed dog off of her dog. If she had kicked it first her dog probably wouldn't have been injured. I'm literally not taking a chance at a dog running at me. If I yell and it keeps running it's getting kicked and repeatedly kicked till it stops coming for me.
I think kicking is a commensurate response to the risk of an unknown, uncontrolled and potentially dangerous dog. When I take my dog off-leash I am not only taking personal responsibility for her welfare (as always) I am also taking on responsibility for potential harm the dog may cause and also the risk of harm to her as other animals and humans respond to the perceived danger of her uncontrolled conduct.

If somebody kicks my dog while she's not under leash control, that's my fault.
 

DeltaRed

Member
Apr 27, 2018
2,217
The compromise is either leashing your dog or training it well enough it will never run at a stranger.

I'm surprised not wanting to get assaulted by a dog is such a controversial opinion, but *shrug*; guess there must be a subsection of the populace who love getting bitten by strange animals.
How many times have you been assaulted by a dog
 

Chaeotic

Member
Oct 25, 2017
275
Perth, Western Australia
Truly curious how much of this is an "American" thing, or rest of the world.

Aussie here, and I take my two down to the local park daily for a run around. There would be a good, oh, 40 or so dogs all off the leash, running around and having a good time. Any anti-social dogs generally don't come back a second time, and with one of mine sorta in that category he's content to chill in my arms while the other and the others do their thing. It's an amazing sight, and I'd hate to see that go away!

-edit- No disrespect by saying it's an "American" thing, just genuinely curious whether it's a consideration or not!
 

LL_Decitrig

Member
Oct 27, 2017
8,929
Sunderland
Surely there is a compromise somewhere between kicking an unleashed, approaching dog and assuming it's friendly.
I don't think it's the potential victim's responsibility to accurately assess the danger my uncontrolled, unleashed dog poses to them, their children or their animals. It's on me to ensure she's never placed in a situation where a person or dog may respond aggressively towards her. To me she may be a goofy, friendly companion who wouldn't hurt a fly, but to a stranger she may look like death on legs.
 
Oct 27, 2017
1,828
Some owners are blind to the faults of their dogs. Like some parents I guess.

I've kicked a dog before. My personal hate is people unable to control their dogs from a distance and have to come over and physically get them off you. If you can't get it to come back to you when calling ("JESUS CHRIST, FENTON") then you have an uncontrollable dog and that could be a problem.

Now, I like dogs, but my 6 year old daughter is scared of them and has been since she was tiny, we were at the park playing football and this dog comes charging over, I can hear the owner in the distance "Jasper! Jasper, come here!" and it's leaping in my daughter's face and going WUFF at her and scrambling all over us and she's screaming, literally screaming in terror, and the fucking dog just wouldn't back down or fuck off, so I gave it a swift kick in the ribs and it got the message. And across the field comes a small distant voice "It's ok, he's very friendly, he won't hurt you!". Fuck. off. I'm sure he just wanted to play, but from my daughter's point of view this slavering hound from hell is all up in her face and it was terrifying for her and the owner was incapable of getting dog under control without coming over and physically dragging it away. We had words the owner and I about her dog control skills or lack thereof.

As far as I'm concerned if a dog does that to me or my kids, I'm justfied in snapping it's fucking neck or staving its head in. I don't know the intentions of your uncontrollable monster.
 
Nov 3, 2017
1,919
Truly curious how much of this is an "American" thing, or rest of the world.

Aussie here, and I take my two down to the local park daily for a run around. There would be a good, oh, 40 or so dogs all off the leash, running around and having a good time. Any anti-social dogs generally don't come back a second time, and with one of mine sorta in that category he's content to chill in my arms while the other and the others do their thing. It's an amazing sight, and I'd hate to see that go away!

-edit- No disrespect by saying it's an "American" thing, just genuinely curious whether it's a consideration or not!
I live in Sydney, and this has been my experience too. My office is near a public park and there’s just a shitton of dogs off leash every day.

One thing to note I guess is that Australia has restrictions on several dangerous dog breeds, so we’re a lot less likely to have like a pitbull running straight at us than someone living elsewhere
 

Chaeotic

Member
Oct 25, 2017
275
Perth, Western Australia
I live in Sydney, and this has been my experience too. My office is near a public park and there’s just a shitton of dogs off leash every day.

One thing to note I guess is that Australia has restrictions on several dangerous dog breeds, so we’re a lot less likely to have like a pitbull running straight at us than someone living elsewhere
Seeing some of the replies above, I think it's got less to do with the type of breed and the act of it running up. I appreciate even my smaller dogs (pugs), could appear threatening to a child if they came bounding up. Thankfully kids seem to adore the breed, and I've never had the issue appear!

I also speak as the survivor of a vicious attack by two Rottweilers as a child, while riding a bicycle. The dogs were unfortunately destroyed (I say that now, twenty years later), but it has taken me a good portion of my life to get over. So I can sympathize with the other side. There are some locations like the beach firmly avoid because of the lack of control, and I guess I'm rather content with my local park and the relative control there. Again, it's such a delight to see a group of forty odd dogs of varying sizes and breeds all run around socialising.
 

Richter1887

Member
Oct 27, 2017
14,221
I don't get it either. Just keep them on a leach, is that so hard?

Yesterday my brother almost hit a dog while driving because his owner had him unleached.


Just because your dog is "a good boy" doesn't give you the excuse of letting him free while outside. Especially when we all know that dogs can be traumatic or scary to some people.
 

Hjod

Avenger
Oct 27, 2017
2,733
Behind my desk.
Un my old apartment I had a cop as a neighbour, he would always take his dog on a walk without a leash, it was a German Shepherd. I'm guessing it was a police trained dog since the dog never looked at me and it just sat down to let me pass it on the stairs, the dog never left his side and seem uninterested in everything.

But still iffy to be honest.
 

fester

Member
Oct 25, 2017
944
I've been bit by unleashed dogs while running in my neighborhood and have the god damned police reports to show for it. My dog and I have been attacked by unleashed dogs on the sidewalk, trail, and even the middle of the fucking road. If you think your dog is some special snowflake that's above the law and doesn't need to be leashed, you're wrong...and a selfish asshole.
 

Horned Reaper

Member
Nov 7, 2017
916
I wouldn't let my doggo off his leash cause I'd be terrified someone would try to snatch him or he would run into the road. He isnt very obedient so he most likely wouldn't listen to me if I called him. But he wouldn't hurt anyone cause hes a pug lmao
I have the exact same problem with my pug. Pugs are just way too stubborn. My pug now does get angry at certain dogs though because they were too playful with him without realizing their size when they were pups. He has held a grudge for years against one of my neigbourhoods dogs. Had me pissed when that dog was walking without his leash.
 

smellyjelly

Avenger
Aug 2, 2018
637
I don't think it's the potential victim's responsibility to accurately assess the danger my uncontrolled, unleashed dog poses to them, their children or their animals. It's on me to ensure she's never placed in a situation where a person or dog may respond aggressively towards her. To me she may be a goofy, friendly companion who wouldn't hurt a fly, but to a stranger she may look like death on legs.
I wholeheartedly agree that its the owner's burden of responsibility to ensure that their dog is not only securely leashed, but also behaviorally trained to mitigate any incidents that may occur. I'll never understand why anyone would ever take their dog off leash. I wouldn't blame anyone for kicking my unleashed dog as I'm aware it's a situation that I should have controlled. There are people who having suffered traumatic experiences with dogs before are unwilling to hesitate to defend themselves and I totally understand that.

That being said, and having been bit by an unleashed dog before and had to unfortunately injure the dog, shit sometimes just happens. While capable of being very well trained and obedient, dogs are also animals and sometimes they can act erratic and spaz out. I've had many dogs approach me who've wiggled out of a leash or had a weathered leash break, and I've come across many dogs who have had inconsiderate owners who for whatever reason hadn't leashed their dog.

I can't imagine how preemptively kicking any/all unleashed dogs does anything but make most situations worse.
 

mysocksarepink

The Fallen
Oct 27, 2017
1,540
my fuckin piece of shit neighbor walks around doing this. we live in brooklyn, not a fucking farm, put a fucking leash on your dog

also, the dog only has 3 legs so it hops and it barely listens

he stands there and calls his name over and over and over when the dog stops listening

i know this because i can fuckin hear him every day!!!!!!!!!!!
 

Jam_Sandwich

Member
Oct 30, 2017
729
Don't label all dog owners as jerks.
Mine walks perfectly to heal off the lead when I need her to and has perfect recall.
She stays on the lead though unless I'm in a forest or open land suitable for her

With the rare exception where her lead broke and I've had to get her back to mine with no lead - oops!

Owners like those described in the OP really shouldn't be letting theirs off though unless in a controlled environment.

Biggest trouble I have with other dog owners are those described in the OP
Poor recall
Poor inter dog social skills

Quite a few times it's left me in an awkward situation with other peoples dogs causing problems for me when I'm out with mine

It's disappointing
 

IAMtheFMan

Member
Oct 25, 2017
388
Chicago
I can relate. My neighbor next door in my building has a smaller dog but still barks at everything all the time which is annoying in and of itself. I’ve had issues with her anyways because of other noise issues in the past, talked with her but she always brushes it off. One day, my wife and I are walking down the hallway to our elevator with our 17 month toddler who is still getting the hang of walking. Elevator door opens and out runs her dog tapping away making a beeline for my kid. Son freezes, freaked out and I have to grab him right when the dog is like a foot or two away as my son bursts into hysterics. Out walks neighbor girl, no words or apologies just a stupid fucking smirk on her face.

I really dislike her.
 

WartPig

Member
Jun 2, 2019
65
Get a can of that Halloween colored hair spray and spray the dogs when they come up (if its safe for dogs). If she complains just say it couldn't have happened if they were on a leash
 

Terminus

Member
Oct 30, 2017
1,533
A cool and fun thing to do is to be on a trail run in the woods and inadvertently get between an off-leash dog and their owner, prompting a frantic doggy freakout. Or to be approaching someone from behind while making all manner of noise to politely warn them, then somehow still surprising their oblivious dog and being subsequently chased down the trail for a quarter mile.
 

fuchsdh

Member
Oct 25, 2017
3,743
Non-leashed dogs are super common in Brooklyn, and if it’s not a tiny dog I’m steering well clear as much as possible. Because of course it seems like they’re usually massive unfixed dogs.
 

astro

Member
Oct 25, 2017
14,803
All dogs should be leashed outside unless in a dog specific area.

All dogs should be muzzled if in confined spaces with other people for a long time: like a plane.
 

Radd Redd

Member
Oct 27, 2017
1,735
I see this all the time in dog parks and pet friendly beaches. Owners act like nothing is wrong while their pets are messing with people. Pisses me off.
 

Bobo Dakes

The Fallen
Oct 25, 2017
19,579
In this instance youve described, I get why you're upset, but I've never thought anything of people walking around their neighborhood or just to their car with their dog unleashed because the dog listens. Not that this is common. But when I see it I'm like, damn, that's a good dog.