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Please stop referring to women as "females" (READ OP)

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Veggen

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,246
So in essencd, should I not use he or she or boy or girl anymore as it may offensive as well?
I wouldn't worry about that, because anthropomorphism is usually regarded as elevating your consideration of animals to human levels, while the other way feels dehumanizing from its shared terminology.
 

corasaur

Member
Oct 26, 2017
3,478
I was just “educated” on this and so, we cant use females cause people use females to describe a gender of an animal?

In that regard, 9 times out of 10 when I discuss an owner’s pets gender, I either ask if the pet is a boy or girl or if its he or she. I rarely say male or female, cause I usually leave that descriptor for humans. So in essence, should I not use he or she or boy or girl anymore as it may be offensive as well?

And is using male the sameway one would be using female in turn also dehumanizing to a man?

And yea this is new to me, but the more you know.

i grew up in a military city my whole life so female and male is like engrained into my brain
some settings deliberately use clinical language. see: police reports, medical documentation, or your own military experience.

this thread is specifically about randomly using "female" in social settings because it usually winds up making it sound like the speaker thinks women are incomprehensible aliens, and people don't like being treated as incomprehensible aliens. "how many females are coming to the party?" would sound kind of creepy, for example.

no anthropomorphizing pets isn't offensive.
 

Kiddo76

Member
Nov 27, 2017
65
I hadn't ever noticed this OP. One thing that gets me every single time is, "I now pronounce you man and wife." So the women is defined by her relationship to a man, but the man is not. It's like nails down a chalkboard.
 

blodtann

Member
Jun 7, 2018
179
Part of this (for me at least), has to do with how we were taught english in school. If they had clearly stated the direct translation from female to my native language, then nobody would have used it as a replacement for woman. I don't know of anyone who refers to women in my country by "kvinnkjonn". If you do, then you are clearly just looking to be offensive.

My point is, please educate us foreigners also, as the way we were thought english never had any emphasis on this. Don't assume that the foreign speaking person is being malicious.
 

Skelepuzzle

Member
Apr 17, 2018
6,080
I was just “educated” on this and so, we cant use females cause people use females to describe a gender of an animal?

In that regard, 9 times out of 10 when I discuss an owner’s pets gender, I either ask if the pet is a boy or girl or if its he or she. I rarely say male or female, cause I usually leave that descriptor for humans. So in essence, should I not use he or she or boy or girl anymore as it may be offensive as well?

And is using male the sameway one would be using female in turn also dehumanizing to a man?

And yea this is new to me, but the more you know.

i grew up in a military city my whole life so female and male is like engrained into my brain
This might help ya out, made it fully "click" for me:



See how it sounds creepy in casual conversation when used as a noun? Outside of some professional settings and documentation of course.
 

RPG_Fanatic

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,222
"she is female" ✔

"she is a female" ✘
I originally avoided this thread because I had a feeling this topic wasn't going to end well. But my curiosity about this issue caused me to look now. Just reading the topic title I wasn't sure what this was about exactly, but this post does a good job explaining your point. The issue isn't the term female referring to a gender, but when the word is used to objectify women.
 

Raziel

Member
May 28, 2019
32
As someone who learnt english as a second language, it always felt natural. But good that these discussions put a bit more light into what it actually means
 

Ziltoidia 9

Member
Oct 25, 2017
3,370
In college a person I was doing a project with did the "a female" thing, and at the time I was like, "huh?" I hadn't ever really heard women refereed to as that, and honestly haven't really seen much of it since. Granted, I'm not around shady people.
 

weemadarthur

Community Resettler
Member
Oct 25, 2017
4,016
It’s a good necrobump. Not on par with the 12 year “told you so” post back on gaf, but pretty good.
 

Gpsych

Member
May 20, 2019
127
Sorry, and what was going on in said 12-year-old thread?
I think it was a prediction about a DC Heroes fighting game. DC vs Mortal Kombat maybe? The guy had received some kind of survey about it and posted it on GAF and tons of people we’re all “That’s bullshit! Never going to happen.” Then years later he necro’d it again when the game was announced.
 

Pop-O-Matic

Banned
Oct 25, 2017
4,366
It was some sort of video game prediction, I’m sorry I don’t recall precisely.

The thread itself hadn’t been used in like a decade, but the user quoted himself, and it was great.
It was someone calling that G4 would be out of business before Nintendo after G4 made a "Nintendo is doomed" claim around the time of the DS/Wii.
 

Deleted member 39450

User requested account closure
Banned
Feb 3, 2018
476
Boston, MA
Yeah every wedding I've been to has said "husband and wife"
I think "husband and wife" is now customary; I don't think I've ever heard it phrased as "man and wife".

In college a person I was doing a project with did the "a female" thing, and at the time I was like, "huh?" I hadn't ever really heard women refereed to as that, and honestly haven't really seen much of it since. Granted, I'm not around shady people.
Use of "female" as a noun is actually quite prevalent in literature, even among authors like Jane Austen. I believe "ladies" and "females" are supposed to be polite ways to refer to groups of women of mixed ages (trying to remember my English lit classes so that might not be completely accurate).

As with anything, I think context matters.
 

Volimar

Moderator
Oct 25, 2017
11,282
Official Staff Communication
Given the way this was necro bumped, the time that has passed, and due to most of the new discussion not being about the thread subject, we're closing this.
 
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