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RPG Community |OT| Take the Epoch to a New Era

Oct 25, 2017
621
0
I might be the only one who cares, but I just read that Mage's Initiation finally got a release date, January 30th, 2019. It is a Quest for Glory inspired rpg/adventure hybrid and I have been waiting for it for many years.

Made by the same people who did the QfG2 fan remake as well.
 
Oct 27, 2017
5,831
0
Playing Ys Memories of Celceta right now (played up to Comodo village on the Vita before getting super bored with it years ago, and now am at Tower of Providence on PC version). While Ys V is easily the worst in the series, this and Seven are definitely the second worst. They are so damn boring. I greatly prefer the two Ys IV's over Celceta, even though they are fairly middle of the road Ys titles.

But man does Celceta have some truly annoying moments. Why do I need a tour of the town for every single damn town? This last one at the town in the Primeval Lands (don't remember the name of it even though I was just there) was infuriating. Just a fetchquest to find random towns people to activate pointless cutscene. And no one shuts up, which I find is a much bigger problem here than in Seven or even VIII (VIII has likeable characters while Celceta's characters are bad)

And certain things like blocking you off from leaving that region until you complete the storyline for that area. Why? Or how I literally just left a town for two seconds by accident and came back and automatically failed a quest.

Some of the field skills are also so hilariously dumb and specific. I legit laughed when Ozma's skill turned out to be just using his spear to break specific underwater cracks. That's it. Why would anyone have that skill? Why? Hahahahaha. Lock picking, ranged weapons for cutting things and knocking them down, using electricity to activate shit, etc. I can understand. But Ozma's skill is so dumb, hahaha.

Some of the remixed music is good though. And even though I really don't like the party combat in Ys (though it's much better in VIII), the game is fast enough to make up for how boringly design everything else is.

Man I can't wait to play through Ys VIII again. Falcom really bounced back from Seven and Celceta with that. Still amazes me how they went from some of the worst of the series to probably the best one in the whole series.
 
Oct 25, 2017
621
0
If you told me that was King's Quest....8? I would believe you
Never played any of the King's Quests so I don't know if that is good, bad, or just a comment on the graphics.

Quest for Glory type games, not counting the actual Quest for Glory series, can be counted on one hand with digits left over, so I will take what I can get.
 
Oct 25, 2017
621
0
More the style to be honest...according to my memory at least
I feel like if I look up actual King's Quest screens I'm gonna feel old and stupid
Then I shall look it up for you. Out of curiosity mind you and not because I want to make you feel old and stupid. I did some googling and KQ8 is 3d, that ugly early 3d like Gothic, KQ7 has a Disney's Sleeping Beauty look, but it does kind of look like a higher resolution KQ6.

After looking at some screens I do remember playing KQ6 or at least a game that looked very similar to it at my friend's house back in the day. I remember being bored because it didn't have any combat like my beloved Quest for Glories.
 
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Oct 25, 2017
7,511
0
Austria
After looking at some screens I do remember playing KQ6 or at least a game that looked very similar to it at my friend's house back in the day. I remember being bored because it didn't have any combat like my beloved Quest for Glories.
But did you watch out for that poisonous snake?

That joke plays for like 3 people in the entire world
 
Oct 25, 2017
3,442
0
So where are you all at wrt RPG?

I just finished TitS SC a bit ago.

I think the next RPG I play will be PS 1 (Switch) which conveniently comes out just as I finish my finals.

After that, I will play Emerald Dragon and then Breath of Fire (both SNES).

It then becomes murkier: I want to play Ultima IV (yes I intend to try to break into CRPG again in the first half of 2019), Mother 1, TitS 3, and KMT in the near future.

There are some games I want to get back to at some point: EOV, RH, and FE3 come to mind.

I need to play FE5 some day and get my revenge (on myself for being an idiot).

I also want to replay DQIII, DQVII, and DQXI.
 
Oct 25, 2017
728
0
Puerto Rico
So where are you all at wrt RPG?

I just finished TitS SC a bit ago.

I think the next RPG I play will be PS 1 (Switch) which conveniently comes out just as I finish my finals.

After that, I will play Emerald Dragon and then Breath of Fire (both SNES).

It then becomes murkier: I want to play Ultima IV (yes I intend to try to break into CRPG again in the first half of 2019), Mother 1, TitS 3, and KMT in the near future.

There are some games I want to get back to at some point: EOV, RH, and FE3 come to mind.

I need to play FE5 some day and get my revenge (on myself for being an idiot).

I also want to replay DQIII, DQVII, and DQXI.
How was TitS? I hear a lot of good things about it especially from this community but I wanna get your take.

I found myself juggling way too many games during the last month between FF8, DQ11, DQ4 and some of the newer releases. I've dropped everything and I'm dedicating my free time solely to DQ11. I'm loving the game so much and I really want to finish it before the year ends if I can. After that, who knows. EO Nexus is definitely something I'd like to play when it comes out. Kingdom Hearts, Final Fantasy 8 and DQ4-9 are all games that I see myself playing immediately after DQ11.

Funny you mention FE5. I think that's the only Fire Emblem game I haven't played yet. I'd really like to play it in English so I'm still waiting for either a patch or an official remake.
 
Oct 25, 2017
3,442
0
How was TitS? I hear a lot of good things about it especially from this community but I wanna get your take.

I found myself juggling way too many games during the last month between FF8, DQ11, DQ4 and some of the newer releases. I've dropped everything and I'm dedicating my free time solely to DQ11. I'm loving the game so much and I really want to finish it before the year ends if I can. After that, who knows. EO Nexus is definitely something I'd like to play when it comes out. Kingdom Hearts, Final Fantasy 8 and DQ4-9 are all games that I see myself playing immediately after DQ11.

Funny you mention FE5. I think that's the only Fire Emblem game I haven't played yet. I'd really like to play it in English so I'm still waiting for either a patch or an official remake.
Some thoughts on TitS (FC & SC) taken in part from the discord: There is a lot of NPC/worldbuilding focus and that bleeds into a political focus. a lot of that also ties into this story of a magical industrial revolution and how it has safeguarded Liberl's precarious place in the world but also how it offers forbidden fruits that maybe Liberl needs or maybe someone else could pluck. So the world is mobilized into the plot.

Another central facet is Estelle and Joshua's relationship. I had some particular issues with it in FC, but it was charming in many repects. In SC though...they really do well by it and the individual parties. IDK TitS characterization in general was kind of slow to grow on me tbh, but it did and that really pays off in SC. Also, TitS knows how to throw an emotional punch when the time comes too. Quite well. The Estelle stuff in SC has been very very good at conveying emotion and, moreover, doing so honestly in a reciprocal way. In general, there is a focus on character drama beyond Estelle and Joshua as well. Moreover, most of the political drama and general drama is told through big lives. Characters are super important to the games.

As to the voice of the vignettes hmmm...While they both really look at the villages and are kind of cutesy, TitS definitely doesn't sound like DQ. I don't know how I'd describe it. Last time I tried in this thread it kind of flopped :P. But it is pretty distinct and took a while to grow on me, as I said about the characterization. It kind of reminds me of a wholesome family that gets into some vigorous play and is put upon by each other's eccentricities. It is maybe kind of folksy, which would feed into the faux early 20th century vibe. There's an innocence in the face of it all and also a lot of people are a little goofy. And then there is reproaching people about this and that or biting the tongue (one thing they frequently do is have characters whisper to each other about others and happenings so as to avoid saying things aloud about strange doings.) So I guess one big difference would be whereas DQ can be kind of far away. TitS is pretty up close. DQ can be kind of minimalist despite there being so much text. TitS is pretty chatty. Both are often cute and goofy. And again, TitS has more of a historic voice whereas DQ is pretty non-historic in its approach. This entails different sorts of whimsy. The color is pretty different.

As to the structure, it kind of narrows, then bulges, then narrows again. E.g. TitS SC 1-5 are wide open, 6-7 are tight, dungeon focused, 8 is wide open, and the finale is tight and dungeon focused. It starts wide and heavily focused on moseying about the towns and doing day-to-day work and telling day-to-day stories. It then metastasizes into an epic that brings in this world building as described above and becomes quite gripping. It kind of sneaks up on you in that way, although that isn't to speak ill of the slower content so much (although SC does feel padded) as to speak to the experience when it hits the gas, so to speak.

As to the combat, make sure to read the orbal stuff in the handbook and go for some of the various spells. It is sort of like a materia system except it is the totality of the orbments that give you abilities and they interact, so they sometimes alter your stats both positively and negatively, that's one way they inform the structure of your character. But then they also work together and character's also have ~unique orbal grid set ups, which works into how they can work together so it is an interesting system imo.

I like the SRPG-like battlefields, the casting, and the various control systems (e.g. interrupts and turn order manipulation).

There's also a limit break esque system keeping the Final Fantasy comparison.
 
Oct 25, 2017
621
0
I am too busy to get into any RPG too deeply right now due to school. In situations like that I usually just play Star Wars: The Old Republic solo. Most MMO people don't really seem to like that game but I don't know I find it kind of relaxing and I can pick it up and drop it real easy.
 
Oct 25, 2017
138
0
Been pretty busy, but playing:

Dragon Quest III (mobile): Changed jobs a few times, current party is MC, Fighter (was Merchant), Martial Artist (was Priest), Sage (was Gadabout). Thinking my first round of merchant for my fighter was pretty much worthless, and might reclass them into a Sage, but I'll take some time to think about it given I only have one of the sage manuals.

Playing the mobile version is really convenient, TBH. Better experience than I expected. Even if I prefer dedicated consoles, I can progress in this much faster than if I were trying the GBC/NES version.

Progress:
Got ship
Beat Orochi
Got a few orbs
still searching the world for the rest, currently on the "king is a jerk" ra's mirror section

Pathfinder: Kingmaker: Mid chapter 2. Pacing is a little slow, but I should expect that from an exploration-focused game. Like nearly every CRPG I've played, I'm feeling like I chose the wrong class/build despite my party doing fine. It has been exciting to find random caches of loot / hidden areas, but it feels like every quest is urgent and it's really hard to pick which to prioritize. Even though I've played Pathfinder before, leveling turns into analysis paralysis as it's hard to decide where to go with each character.

I started the game a few days after it first came out and haven't run into any major bugs. They've done a pretty good job with hotfixes, although people who had more time to put into the game had a much worse experience. It's a stable game now, and better balanced than it was at release.
 
Oct 25, 2017
3,442
0
Dragon Quest III (mobile): Changed jobs a few times, current party is MC, Fighter (was Merchant), Martial Artist (was Priest), Sage (was Gadabout). Thinking my first round of merchant for my fighter was pretty much worthless, and might reclass them into a Sage, but I'll take some time to think about it given I only have one of the sage manuals.

Playing the mobile version is really convenient, TBH. Better experience than I expected. Even if I prefer dedicated consoles, I can progress in this much faster than if I were trying the GBC/NES version.
DQIII is great imo. Are you enjoying it so far?
 
I'm most of the way through The Alliance Alive now. This means I've reached the final Realm, though I'm pretty sure the ending area's much different. Combat's still not that repetitive despite tens of hours of fighting, and the sparks come along when they matter most (aka during the middle of a tough optional overworld fight).

So far I'm loving this game. It's a great blend of a conventional Final Fantasy-style adventure with SaGa-isms and a dash of Suikoden. I'm able to pace myself well thanks to good side-content and a fast main story. And the presentation's pretty good despite the budget expectations. Hamauzu's music rarely disappoints, and the art direction's very consistent (tailored well to the platform too).

Man I can't wait to play through Ys VIII again. Falcom really bounced back from Seven and Celceta with that. Still amazes me how they went from some of the worst of the series to probably the best one in the whole series.
You'd change your tune if you played Ys III. That's got maybe one okay version to play, and Oath doesn't count here.

Celceta also makes many mistakes I'd never associate with Seven. Seven at least has great dungeons, bosses, and set-pieces to make up for a meh story and opening. The added polish in Celceta ends up double-edged because the game isn't any more challenging to compensate. I still like the game, but it overshadows a better predecessor. Now VIII overshadows both of them for better or worse.
 
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Oct 25, 2017
1,517
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So, I recently finished up Mother 1 on GBA.

I'd never played a Mother/Earthbound game before, but I always knew of them. I gained knowledge of things like Mr. Saturn, Negativeman, Starmen, and such via osmosis online and through games like Smash Bros. I'd also had them pitched to me numerous times by RPG fans who'd been stomping around the genre much longer than I have. For the longest time, I skipped on the series. People had told me wondrous things about its charm and whimsy, but I let their words just flutter on by. I had a few reasons to never bother with the series, and I stuck to them until recently: It was before my time, I don't like first person combat, and people hyping it up means it can only disappoint me. My usual three excuses to skip on things like that.

I'd like to say my excuses failed me, and I gave Mother 1 a spin. I was encouraged to do so by having others around me in the discord get excited to play it. They too had never touched it, and I felt like I wasn't alone in wandering into a series I'd known so much about but experienced so little of. Yet, the most encouraging thing came from simple comments like "I think you'll like it." or "It's one of my favorite games." There was nothing hyperbolic that could get my hopes and expectations up too high. There was just personal positivity in the nudges telling me to check it out, which was a huge relief. I'm overly familiar with the bombastic claims that are often made on message boards and discord channels when people think you're required to experience something they consider to be the greatest of all time.

With my reservations smacked aside, I started it up. Initially, I felt it was obtuse in some ways and quite bizarre. The opening throws you into the mix with little explanation, rhyme, or reason for what is happening. I imagine that was intentional, but it left a strange start to a game that I figured I was going to be lukewarm on throughout the entire experience. Clearing the starting area and simply wandering around left me more confused, but I didn't find any frustration in it. I found myself listening to the cute soundtrack and gradually nodding my head, humming it to myself while I aimlessly poked around and talked to people. I suppose it made me feel like a kid in some sense, having no real aims, ambitions, or real responsibilities that shackle me to the earth.

There was a charm to it though that started to grow out. Gradually, and sometimes in large patches. But it grew. Slowly but surely, I found myself with a bit of a smirk. It was me against the world with my trusty slugger on my shoulder, taming and hushing hippies and rednecks alike as they accosted me for whatever reason. I started to crack a smile when I got into battle with a rather large crow who had a cigar. He stole my bread. So I beat him with my bat. I never got my bread back, and I'll always remember it as my first tragic loss. I carried that tragedy with me as I took my bat to cars, rabid dogs, saucers, punks, and more.

While I'm touching on combat, I found myself surprised that I didn't bounce off of it with my usual dislike of first person battles. The wit and the charm do a lot to carry it, and getting that ever-satisfying Smaaaaaaaaaaaaaash! certainly adds a lot of character to the battles. In fact, the game did such a stand-up job of making me feel like a kid again, that I had to use my imagination even in battle. Every swing, each exploding bomb, bolt of lightning, sparkle of healing light - they're not represented in much more than sound effects, small flickers, and simple descriptions in combat. But they had weight to them, at least… they did in my head.

Mother brought my imagination to the forefront to help me through the battles that I typically shy away from, but it also did something on the emotional front. It made me smile. It made me laugh. It made me get choked up. It made genuinely chuckle aloud, which is something especially rare. But it also pulled on the heartstrings in some places. Personally, I resonate very strongly with games that make me feel something. It's why I like survival horror so much. My heart racing, that feeling of fear, and the excitement of being moved emotionally through the negative spectrum. It's also why I love romantic k-dramas, intense music, and tragic novels - they make me feel something, so I resonate strongly in response. And Mother managed to elicit feelings from me.

I don't want to go too far into spoilers, so I'll refrain from sharing specifics about what else made me smile, laugh, or feel good throughout the story as I feel these things are best discovered organically. Everything felt wholesome, with a charm to it that I usually find in slower paced slice of life games. The story leaves you curious for oh-so-long before it starts to give you a few more of the pieces that you need to put everything together. By the time you have it, you're at the end of the game with a very heartwarming and perhaps bittersweet story. You've picked up allies, hardened yourselves in combat alongside them, and helped them grow through their own arcs.

Once you learn more about the world and see what it has to offer, exploring it rewards you with quite a bit. One such example would be the graceful Flying Man. Such an event made me try to talk to everyone when I could. This is notable for me as I am not the type who talks to every NPC. I don't enter every home, nor do I explore every nook and cranny of the map. Yet Mother 1 packed charm into every spot it could. It rewards you with little bits, no matter how tiny they are, that make the world feel alive.

While I'm largely positive on the game, there are some issues that I have with it. It's hard to hold them against it due to how old the game is and the overall scope. Still, I found some things like item management to be a pain, and general UI navigation can dampen the experience. Items don't tell you what they do unless you inspect them, you've no idea what stats your weapons have, and you'd be forgiven if you though Healing actually restored health. Yet, with those are things that I overlooked as I carried on. I mention them only to make anyone aware that it is still an older game that is missing some of the modern quality of life options we have in modern games, but they don't break or ruin the experience per se.

Initially, I listed 'lack of direction' and 'no idea what I'm doing or where I'm going most of the time' as negatives. Yet, looking back on my experience, I don't think I'd consider them anything more than just neutral thoughts. In an era where we have giant arrows pointing us to checkpoints or flashing beacons on the screen or someone yelling at you to head to the next cutscene, it felt a bit refreshing to go back to just looking around and thinking about my next plan of attack or location I haven't been to yet. I opened up a notepad and jotted down a couple things, which is something I haven't done in many years.

Overall, I quite enjoyed Mother 1. It was short and sweet. It never overstayed its welcome and it never really frustrated me or wasted my time. It was strange, bizarre, and humorous. It was wholesome and fun and I quite enjoyed my time with it. While it may not be one of my favorite games, it's one that I'll think highly of and recommend to others surely. It's unique and I'm glad I was able to be persuaded to check it out. I'd recommend it to anyone who hasn't played it yet, but do go in knowing it can be a little unruly when it comes to UI navigation. Even if you're like me and don't enjoy first person combat, don't let that scare you off. I think it works well as its snappy, and the charm itself pours into the combat as well.

It was great sharing my experiences with Taborcarn who started around the same time I did and kept pace with me (even finishing around 30 mins after I did), giving updates to Opa-Pa who adores the game and took great joy in more people playing (and encouraged us along the way), and now writing this up to share with you guys. I now have that feeling of excitement when others are running through the game, especially those who are cheerful, positive, wholesome like our own futurememory here.

I'm looking forward to Earthbound now, but I'll give it some time before I pick up the bat again. To finish this off, I'll simply share a hint of what my favorite part of Mother 1 is.
 
Oct 25, 2017
7,516
0
Damn, it says a lot about how much Mother affects me that just reading Lumi's impressions made me kinda emotional. It's such a special game to me, its sincere silly humor and its child-like innocence, I love it, and seeing others enjoy it warms my heart. Thanks a lot for sharing your thoughts, seeing you guys play through it has seriously been a joy.

Flying Man, too pure :tear:
 
Oct 27, 2017
5,831
0
I'm most of the way through The Alliance Alive now. This means I've reached the final Realm, though I'm pretty sure the ending area's much different. Combat's still not that repetitive despite tens of hours of fighting, and the sparks come along when they matter most (aka during the middle of a tough optional overworld fight).

So far I'm loving this game. It's a great blend of a conventional Final Fantasy-style adventure with SaGa-isms and a dash of Suikoden. I'm able to pace myself well thanks to good side-content and a fast main story. And the presentation's pretty good despite the budget expectations. Hamauzu's music rarely disappoints, and the art direction's very consistent (tailored well to the platform too).

You'd change your tune if you played Ys III. That's got maybe one okay version to play, and Oath doesn't count here.

Celceta also makes many mistakes I'd never associate with Seven. Seven at least has great dungeons, bosses, and set-pieces to make up for a meh story and opening. The added polish in Celceta ends up double-edged because the game isn't any more challenging to compensate. I still like the game, but it overshadows a better predecessor. Now VIII overshadows both of them for better or worse.
I have played Ys III ( I own the SNES version). I find it better than Seven and Celceta
 
Oct 27, 2017
471
0


So, I recently finished up Mother 1 on GBA.

I'd never played a Mother/Earthbound game before, but I always knew of them. I gained knowledge of things like Mr. Saturn, Negativeman, Starmen, and such via osmosis online and through games like Smash Bros. I'd also had them pitched to me numerous times by RPG fans who'd been stomping around the genre much longer than I have. For the longest time, I skipped on the series. People had told me wondrous things about its charm and whimsy, but I let their words just flutter on by. I had a few reasons to never bother with the series, and I stuck to them until recently: It was before my time, I don't like first person combat, and people hyping it up means it can only disappoint me. My usual three excuses to skip on things like that.

I'd like to say my excuses failed me, and I gave Mother 1 a spin. I was encouraged to do so by having others around me in the discord get excited to play it. They too had never touched it, and I felt like I wasn't alone in wandering into a series I'd known so much about but experienced so little of. Yet, the most encouraging thing came from simple comments like "I think you'll like it." or "It's one of my favorite games." There was nothing hyperbolic that could get my hopes and expectations up too high. There was just personal positivity in the nudges telling me to check it out, which was a huge relief. I'm overly familiar with the bombastic claims that are often made on message boards and discord channels when people think you're required to experience something they consider to be the greatest of all time.

With my reservations smacked aside, I started it up. Initially, I felt it was obtuse in some ways and quite bizarre. The opening throws you into the mix with little explanation, rhyme, or reason for what is happening. I imagine that was intentional, but it left a strange start to a game that I figured I was going to be lukewarm on throughout the entire experience. Clearing the starting area and simply wandering around left me more confused, but I didn't find any frustration in it. I found myself listening to the cute soundtrack and gradually nodding my head, humming it to myself while I aimlessly poked around and talked to people. I suppose it made me feel like a kid in some sense, having no real aims, ambitions, or real responsibilities that shackle me to the earth.

There was a charm to it though that started to grow out. Gradually, and sometimes in large patches. But it grew. Slowly but surely, I found myself with a bit of a smirk. It was me against the world with my trusty slugger on my shoulder, taming and hushing hippies and rednecks alike as they accosted me for whatever reason. I started to crack a smile when I got into battle with a rather large crow who had a cigar. He stole my bread. So I beat him with my bat. I never got my bread back, and I'll always remember it as my first tragic loss. I carried that tragedy with me as I took my bat to cars, rabid dogs, saucers, punks, and more.

While I'm touching on combat, I found myself surprised that I didn't bounce off of it with my usual dislike of first person battles. The wit and the charm do a lot to carry it, and getting that ever-satisfying Smaaaaaaaaaaaaaash! certainly adds a lot of character to the battles. In fact, the game did such a stand-up job of making me feel like a kid again, that I had to use my imagination even in battle. Every swing, each exploding bomb, bolt of lightning, sparkle of healing light - they're not represented in much more than sound effects, small flickers, and simple descriptions in combat. But they had weight to them, at least… they did in my head.

Mother brought my imagination to the forefront to help me through the battles that I typically shy away from, but it also did something on the emotional front. It made me smile. It made me laugh. It made me get choked up. It made genuinely chuckle aloud, which is something especially rare. But it also pulled on the heartstrings in some places. Personally, I resonate very strongly with games that make me feel something. It's why I like survival horror so much. My heart racing, that feeling of fear, and the excitement of being moved emotionally through the negative spectrum. It's also why I love romantic k-dramas, intense music, and tragic novels - they make me feel something, so I resonate strongly in response. And Mother managed to elicit feelings from me.

I don't want to go too far into spoilers, so I'll refrain from sharing specifics about what else made me smile, laugh, or feel good throughout the story as I feel these things are best discovered organically. Everything felt wholesome, with a charm to it that I usually find in slower paced slice of life games. The story leaves you curious for oh-so-long before it starts to give you a few more of the pieces that you need to put everything together. By the time you have it, you're at the end of the game with a very heartwarming and perhaps bittersweet story. You've picked up allies, hardened yourselves in combat alongside them, and helped them grow through their own arcs.

Once you learn more about the world and see what it has to offer, exploring it rewards you with quite a bit. One such example would be the graceful Flying Man. Such an event made me try to talk to everyone when I could. This is notable for me as I am not the type who talks to every NPC. I don't enter every home, nor do I explore every nook and cranny of the map. Yet Mother 1 packed charm into every spot it could. It rewards you with little bits, no matter how tiny they are, that make the world feel alive.

While I'm largely positive on the game, there are some issues that I have with it. It's hard to hold them against it due to how old the game is and the overall scope. Still, I found some things like item management to be a pain, and general UI navigation can dampen the experience. Items don't tell you what they do unless you inspect them, you've no idea what stats your weapons have, and you'd be forgiven if you though Healing actually restored health. Yet, with those are things that I overlooked as I carried on. I mention them only to make anyone aware that it is still an older game that is missing some of the modern quality of life options we have in modern games, but they don't break or ruin the experience per se.

Initially, I listed 'lack of direction' and 'no idea what I'm doing or where I'm going most of the time' as negatives. Yet, looking back on my experience, I don't think I'd consider them anything more than just neutral thoughts. In an era where we have giant arrows pointing us to checkpoints or flashing beacons on the screen or someone yelling at you to head to the next cutscene, it felt a bit refreshing to go back to just looking around and thinking about my next plan of attack or location I haven't been to yet. I opened up a notepad and jotted down a couple things, which is something I haven't done in many years.

Overall, I quite enjoyed Mother 1. It was short and sweet. It never overstayed its welcome and it never really frustrated me or wasted my time. It was strange, bizarre, and humorous. It was wholesome and fun and I quite enjoyed my time with it. While it may not be one of my favorite games, it's one that I'll think highly of and recommend to others surely. It's unique and I'm glad I was able to be persuaded to check it out. I'd recommend it to anyone who hasn't played it yet, but do go in knowing it can be a little unruly when it comes to UI navigation. Even if you're like me and don't enjoy first person combat, don't let that scare you off. I think it works well as its snappy, and the charm itself pours into the combat as well.

It was great sharing my experiences with Taborcarn who started around the same time I did and kept pace with me (even finishing around 30 mins after I did), giving updates to Opa-Pa who adores the game and took great joy in more people playing (and encouraged us along the way), and now writing this up to share with you guys. I now have that feeling of excitement when others are running through the game, especially those who are cheerful, positive, wholesome like our own futurememory here.

I'm looking forward to Earthbound now, but I'll give it some time before I pick up the bat again. To finish this off, I'll simply share a hint of what my favorite part of Mother 1 is.
Great write-up Lumi, and it pretty much encapsulates my feeling on the game as well. I don't think I'll show up on my top 10 games lists, but I'm really glad I played it and am looking forward to the further games in the series. It was such a pure experience going back to an NES RPG like this, and it was a great palette cleanser in between some of the heavier games I've been playing lately.

Oh and one last time for the folks in the back:
 
Oct 25, 2017
138
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DQIII is great imo. Are you enjoying it so far?
By and large, yeah - I finished the NES version a long long time ago, and I only remembered bits and pieces. I'm grinding more than I expected to need to but still struggling with some boss fights (in one case, desperate attacks could OTKO some party members from full health, before I had access to any revive spells).

I do kind of miss the pacheesi tracks from the GBC version (played ~8 hours of that version), since that offered a kind of mental break from the core gameflow. Definitely feeling the vignette-driven story of the series, given the core story is so barebones, but most of it has been good even if they're less detailed than later entries.

Changing classes around a bunch is tempting, but outside of splashing in some spells and maybe getting slightly better stats overall it doesn't seem that beneficial (since Sage is the only "advanced" class). It's not like DQ9 where trying out classes is never a mistake and every class has at least a few perks that could benefit (almost) any other class. Getting back up to snuff right after a class change takes time.

It's a really impressive game in retrospect because even though a few things were added/changed for flavor its core still feels relatively modern.
 
Oct 25, 2017
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So I put a little over 6 hours into Aeon of Sands today...

Pros:
+ Great aesthetic, really nice art and background music helps set a cool tone
+ Neat setting, it's a post apocalypse where people have lost all technology and have forgotten there even was a time when the world wasn't like this. Feels very Dark Sun-ish.

Cons:
- Combat is completely brain dead easy. You can square dance around everything really easily, the only times I took damage in combat was when I was dumb and cornered myself.
- Dungeons are very very bland. One of my twitch viewers asked if the maps were randomly generated cause they seemed like it, they aren't randomly generated but they certainly feel like Dungeon Hack maps. Just big empty mazes with nothing interesting going on at all.
- Itemization is poor. I found so many duplicates of items I already had, getting any kind of upgrade was rare.
- Character progression is non existent. You don't level up, you increase a skill that seems to have no effect on anything. For example my fighter went from 0% fighting to almost 70%, nothing changed. He hits *every* time regardless of skill and damage was determined purely by his weapon. So your only real feeling of progression is gear and as I said above, the itemization ain't great.
- The floor is lava. Seriously they *love* covering their dungeons in floor tiles that hurt you and force you to walk through them. I guess this is the compensate for the fact that you'll never take combat damage.
- Inventory management is a nightmare. You start with 1 character with 25 slots, I recruited a second character who *HAD NO INVENTORY*. Yes, the second character cannot carry or equip any items at all. You'll be juggling weapons, healing items, all these weird mana items (the game has a *really* odd magic system), totems to cast spells, and occasionally items needed to solve the dungeon. I left so much stuff lying on the floor cause I had no room for it.
- The writing is bizarre. So the game sets this really sombre cool mood with the art and music, yet the writing almost feels like deadpool with your character constantly breaking the fourth wall and cracking bad jokes. So tonally it's all over the map. It's also very clearly been translated into english from another language, poorly.

So yea really disappointed in this. It looked super cool and it's in a genre I love to death but they whiffed on just about everything here.
 
Oct 25, 2017
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On a completely different note, Fanatical put out a new bundle that's got some great RPG's in it:

RPGs: KOTOR 1, KOTOR 2, Age of Decadence, Shadowrun Hong Kong. (All good stuff!)
Non RPGs: Styx 2, KOFXIII, Oxenfree, Metal Slug X, Sim City 4.

Helluva bundle of games for 5ish bucks.
 
Oct 27, 2017
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So, I recently finished up Mother 1 on GBA.

I'd never played a Mother/Earthbound game before, but I always knew of them. I gained knowledge of things like Mr. Saturn, Negativeman, Starmen, and such via osmosis online and through games like Smash Bros. I'd also had them pitched to me numerous times by RPG fans who'd been stomping around the genre much longer than I have. For the longest time, I skipped on the series. People had told me wondrous things about its charm and whimsy, but I let their words just flutter on by. I had a few reasons to never bother with the series, and I stuck to them until recently: It was before my time, I don't like first person combat, and people hyping it up means it can only disappoint me. My usual three excuses to skip on things like that.

I'd like to say my excuses failed me, and I gave Mother 1 a spin. I was encouraged to do so by having others around me in the discord get excited to play it. They too had never touched it, and I felt like I wasn't alone in wandering into a series I'd known so much about but experienced so little of. Yet, the most encouraging thing came from simple comments like "I think you'll like it." or "It's one of my favorite games." There was nothing hyperbolic that could get my hopes and expectations up too high. There was just personal positivity in the nudges telling me to check it out, which was a huge relief. I'm overly familiar with the bombastic claims that are often made on message boards and discord channels when people think you're required to experience something they consider to be the greatest of all time.

With my reservations smacked aside, I started it up. Initially, I felt it was obtuse in some ways and quite bizarre. The opening throws you into the mix with little explanation, rhyme, or reason for what is happening. I imagine that was intentional, but it left a strange start to a game that I figured I was going to be lukewarm on throughout the entire experience. Clearing the starting area and simply wandering around left me more confused, but I didn't find any frustration in it. I found myself listening to the cute soundtrack and gradually nodding my head, humming it to myself while I aimlessly poked around and talked to people. I suppose it made me feel like a kid in some sense, having no real aims, ambitions, or real responsibilities that shackle me to the earth.

There was a charm to it though that started to grow out. Gradually, and sometimes in large patches. But it grew. Slowly but surely, I found myself with a bit of a smirk. It was me against the world with my trusty slugger on my shoulder, taming and hushing hippies and rednecks alike as they accosted me for whatever reason. I started to crack a smile when I got into battle with a rather large crow who had a cigar. He stole my bread. So I beat him with my bat. I never got my bread back, and I'll always remember it as my first tragic loss. I carried that tragedy with me as I took my bat to cars, rabid dogs, saucers, punks, and more.

While I'm touching on combat, I found myself surprised that I didn't bounce off of it with my usual dislike of first person battles. The wit and the charm do a lot to carry it, and getting that ever-satisfying Smaaaaaaaaaaaaaash! certainly adds a lot of character to the battles. In fact, the game did such a stand-up job of making me feel like a kid again, that I had to use my imagination even in battle. Every swing, each exploding bomb, bolt of lightning, sparkle of healing light - they're not represented in much more than sound effects, small flickers, and simple descriptions in combat. But they had weight to them, at least… they did in my head.

Mother brought my imagination to the forefront to help me through the battles that I typically shy away from, but it also did something on the emotional front. It made me smile. It made me laugh. It made me get choked up. It made genuinely chuckle aloud, which is something especially rare. But it also pulled on the heartstrings in some places. Personally, I resonate very strongly with games that make me feel something. It's why I like survival horror so much. My heart racing, that feeling of fear, and the excitement of being moved emotionally through the negative spectrum. It's also why I love romantic k-dramas, intense music, and tragic novels - they make me feel something, so I resonate strongly in response. And Mother managed to elicit feelings from me.

I don't want to go too far into spoilers, so I'll refrain from sharing specifics about what else made me smile, laugh, or feel good throughout the story as I feel these things are best discovered organically. Everything felt wholesome, with a charm to it that I usually find in slower paced slice of life games. The story leaves you curious for oh-so-long before it starts to give you a few more of the pieces that you need to put everything together. By the time you have it, you're at the end of the game with a very heartwarming and perhaps bittersweet story. You've picked up allies, hardened yourselves in combat alongside them, and helped them grow through their own arcs.

Once you learn more about the world and see what it has to offer, exploring it rewards you with quite a bit. One such example would be the graceful Flying Man. Such an event made me try to talk to everyone when I could. This is notable for me as I am not the type who talks to every NPC. I don't enter every home, nor do I explore every nook and cranny of the map. Yet Mother 1 packed charm into every spot it could. It rewards you with little bits, no matter how tiny they are, that make the world feel alive.

While I'm largely positive on the game, there are some issues that I have with it. It's hard to hold them against it due to how old the game is and the overall scope. Still, I found some things like item management to be a pain, and general UI navigation can dampen the experience. Items don't tell you what they do unless you inspect them, you've no idea what stats your weapons have, and you'd be forgiven if you though Healing actually restored health. Yet, with those are things that I overlooked as I carried on. I mention them only to make anyone aware that it is still an older game that is missing some of the modern quality of life options we have in modern games, but they don't break or ruin the experience per se.

Initially, I listed 'lack of direction' and 'no idea what I'm doing or where I'm going most of the time' as negatives. Yet, looking back on my experience, I don't think I'd consider them anything more than just neutral thoughts. In an era where we have giant arrows pointing us to checkpoints or flashing beacons on the screen or someone yelling at you to head to the next cutscene, it felt a bit refreshing to go back to just looking around and thinking about my next plan of attack or location I haven't been to yet. I opened up a notepad and jotted down a couple things, which is something I haven't done in many years.

Overall, I quite enjoyed Mother 1. It was short and sweet. It never overstayed its welcome and it never really frustrated me or wasted my time. It was strange, bizarre, and humorous. It was wholesome and fun and I quite enjoyed my time with it. While it may not be one of my favorite games, it's one that I'll think highly of and recommend to others surely. It's unique and I'm glad I was able to be persuaded to check it out. I'd recommend it to anyone who hasn't played it yet, but do go in knowing it can be a little unruly when it comes to UI navigation. Even if you're like me and don't enjoy first person combat, don't let that scare you off. I think it works well as its snappy, and the charm itself pours into the combat as well.

It was great sharing my experiences with Taborcarn who started around the same time I did and kept pace with me (even finishing around 30 mins after I did), giving updates to Opa-Pa who adores the game and took great joy in more people playing (and encouraged us along the way), and now writing this up to share with you guys. I now have that feeling of excitement when others are running through the game, especially those who are cheerful, positive, wholesome like our own futurememory here.

I'm looking forward to Earthbound now, but I'll give it some time before I pick up the bat again. To finish this off, I'll simply share a hint of what my favorite part of Mother 1 is.
Luminaire, this is beautifully written. Eventually I'll coalesce my thoughts into some sort of order (probably upon completion of the game, I'm our resident snail player), but Mother has been such a lovely and joyous game to play to end the year. I'm only just past the Duncan Factory, but it's completely and utterly delightful, and has made me emotional in small ways more than I thought possible. I'm utterly charmed by it. If this is just the beginning of the Mother series, I can't wait to see what Earthbound and Mother 3 have in store for me.
 
Can't seem to get back on to Persona 5 on a regular basis. I keep coming back to it for 5-10 hour stints over the weekends then doing/playing other things during the week. I was determined to finish it before December, but only made it to 30 hours so far lol. Oh well.

I am enjoying it when I do play it though.
 
Oct 25, 2017
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Can't seem to get back on to Persona 5 on a regular basis. I keep coming back to it for 5-10 hour stints over the weekends then doing/playing other things during the week. I was determined to finish it before December, but only made it to 30 hours so far lol. Oh well.

I am enjoying it when I do play it though.
I think thats a good way to play it. Should help you prevent burning out!

I want to get back to it but I'd need to start over.
 
Oct 25, 2017
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I beat the first story in Odin Sphere Leifdrasir. I’m playing this on and off, so I think I will be fine with the repetition.

Game plays great and looks great. I still think that I have a slight preference for Muramasa, though.
 
Oct 25, 2017
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BTW, the upcoming RPG list in the OP isn't abandoned. I've just had a lot to do, lately. A proper update will happen in two weeks.

Finally beat Lionheart: Legacy of the Crusader. Hoo boy, the latter part is like playing an hack 'n slash game.

Immediately booted up Icewind Dale II. It's far from my favorite IE game, but it is my least replayed by far, so I told myself "Why not"?
 
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