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So, Era, I'm making a fighting game.

Kalmakov

Member
Sep 10, 2019
806
Fighting games have been a big part of my life for the last decade or so, for better or worse. I've attended locals just about every other week for the last three years or so, made some of my best friends there, and I've played a ton of games. During all of this time, I've always brainstormed several ideas of what I would do if I were to make a fighting game. Well, starting yesterday, I've started to put some of those ideas to paper and learning how to implement them. I started learning unreal engine 4 and I've been watching a ton of tutorials on how to use it and how to properly code. I'm more than aware that this is a massive undertaking, fighting games are super hard to develop after all, but it's something I want to do.

I'm making a thread on this because I feel like putting it out there that I am working on a fighter will help keep me focused and committed, as I will now have to meet an expectation I have set for myself.

I don't want to divulge too much on the game as anything is subject to change, but I'd be happy to answer any questions anyone may have. As I develop the game, I'll share updates on this thread.

Update #1 [12-3-19]:
So, I've got nothing to show off gameplay wise yet. Mostly gray placeholder models that barely animate, nothing that could really demonstrate what the game is about. I've been working on the project still. Slowly, but surely.

As of right now, here's a glimpse at the first finalized character design for the game; Yaminah Yoshida!
 
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low-G

Member
Oct 25, 2017
6,478
Have you developed games anywhere before? How’s your artistic ability? Experience with 3D modeling or line art? Do you have software engineering experience? Are you aware of iterative design (you’re going to need to be)?

I’ve been dabbling in more serious game dev for a bit now, and it’s just as hard as I expected.
 

lucebuce

Community Resettler
Member
Oct 25, 2017
12,122
Pakistan
Make sure to add a Portuguese character.

Also, remove setplay and oki. Only neutral if you wanna compete with the big boys of FGs.
 
OP
OP
Kalmakov

Kalmakov

Member
Sep 10, 2019
806
Have you developed games anywhere before? How’s your artistic ability? Experience with 3D modeling or line art? Do you have software engineering experience? Are you aware of iterative design (you’re going to need to be)?

I’ve been dabbling in more serious game dev for a bit now, and it’s just as hard as I expected.
No.
Good, in my personal opinion. I do illustration work as a job.
Line art yes, 3d no.
No, but that's what I'm attempting to learn.
Yes, I'm aware of interative design.
 

Chivalry

Member
Nov 22, 2018
1,927
Thanks for telling us. Now you'll have less motivation to ever finish it.

Good luck. Return with the kickstarter link in 5-10 years.
 

Chivalry

Member
Nov 22, 2018
1,927
Why do you say that?

Anyway, you're already trying way too much. Being a jack-of-all-trades is no good. It takes many years to become proficient in any aspect of gamedev. Focus on one of these, hire people to help you out with the rest.
 

Lant_War

The Fallen
Jul 14, 2018
11,349
Please don't take this the wrong way, but you're trying to learn coding, modelling and animating all at the same time. I'd start with something much simpler first and then keep going.
 

Iori Loco

Member
Nov 10, 2017
1,181
I've seen many projects that begin and then go nowhere (shoutouts to Gigamaidens, lol). Even games like Skullgirls took a lot of time and money to finally release, but who knows, I think Vanguard Princess was made by one person, but said person worked for Capcom before.

But hey, don't let your dreams be memes, as they say, maybe you'll make the next Skullgirls happen.

Please don't take this the wrong way, but you're trying to learn coding, modelling and animating all at the same time. I'd start with something much simpler first and then keep going.
This too, maybe start making a character in MUGEN, or something and see how it goes.
 
OP
OP
Kalmakov

Kalmakov

Member
Sep 10, 2019
806

Anyway, you're already trying way too much. Being a jack-of-all-trades is no good. It takes many years to become proficient in any aspect of gamedev. Focus on one of these, hire people to help you out with the rest.
I guess that makes sense, and I'll take you advice on seeking help.
 

Pellaidh

Member
Oct 26, 2017
1,013
If you've never programmed a large project before, I'd really recommend starting with some smaller project first, before going into the fighting game. Something like a super simple Bejeweled clone, or a very basic 2D platformer. Or even just a super simple fighter on the level of Divekick or those NES karate fighting games or something.

As a beginner, you're pretty likely to mess things up to the point you'll feel like starting over, and realizing you've fucked up on a small project is much better than doing it on your dream game. My first "real" coding project taught me way more than years of college in terms of how to actually write code. Plus, it'll get you some perspective on just how demanding solo game-dev can be, so that if you give up you'll at least have something to show for it.

Also, just in case your tutorials don't cover this (because I know a lot don't), make sure you:

1. Use a version control system (like git) along with a web host (like Github or Bitbucket). Not only does this give you online backups so you never lose your code, but it also lets you define what are basically code "checkpoints". So that whenever something breaks (and it very likely will), you can easily check what you changed since the last working version, or as a last resort just delete all of these changes to get back to the last working version.

2. Write tests. No one likes doing it, but everyone at some point in the project wishes they did. It will make your life a thousand times easier when working on such a large project.

If you're going to actually code things instead of just using Unreal blueprints, I'd also recommend maybe checking out Unity (or even Game Maker if you're doing 2d stuff). Unreal Engine uses C++ for the code part, and that's pretty much the worst language for a beginner to use in my opinion. It just gives you too many options to break things, and has a ton of hidden complexity that's hard to grasp even for more experienced programmers.
 

DoubleTake

Member
Oct 25, 2017
3,590
Good luck OP. Hope it pans out for you. Don't get down on yourself if it doesnt, take solace in even attempting to do so.
 

Tain

Member
Oct 25, 2017
3,109
Maybe do small small small scale personal projects before tackling something like a fighting game. Even a game like Footsies is a huge undertaking if you're new to gamedev.

Then again, even if you don't complete this game you'll learn a shitload and having the motivation is the most important part.
 

low-G

Member
Oct 25, 2017
6,478
Yeah I would say to OP, do not EVEN TRY to make your final goal fighting game for a year or two. You will fail. Keep making smaller scoped games until you get your chops. Make Yie Ar Kung Fu clones if you have to, but nothing Street Fighter 2 scoped or higher.
 

fireflame

Member
Oct 27, 2017
1,893
Fighting games have been a big part of my life for the last decade or so, for better or worse. I've attended locals just about every other week for the last three years or so, made some of my best friends there, and I've played a ton of games. During all of this time, I've always brainstormed several ideas of what I would do if I were to make a fighting game. Well, starting yesterday, I've started to put some of those ideas to paper and learning how to implement them. I started learning unreal engine 4 and I've been watching a ton of tutorials on how to use it and how to properly code. I'm more than aware that this is a massive undertaking, fighting games are super hard to develop after all, but it's something I want to do.

I'm making a thread on this because I feel like putting it out there that I am working on a fighter will help keep me focused and committed, as I will now have to meet an expectation I have set for myself.

I don't want to divulge too much on the game as anything is subject to change, but I'd be happy to answer any questions anyone may have. As I develop the game, I'll share updates on this thread.
are there shortcuts to make special moves? Like pressing rb for ki blasts(rival schools let you use RBor RT for special burning vigor attacks)
 
OP
OP
Kalmakov

Kalmakov

Member
Sep 10, 2019
806
If you've never programmed a large project before, I'd really recommend starting with some smaller project first, before going into the fighting game. Something like a super simple Bejeweled clone, or a very basic 2D platformer. Or even just a super simple fighter on the level of Divekick or those NES karate fighting games or something.

As a beginner, you're pretty likely to mess things up to the point you'll feel like starting over, and realizing you've fucked up on a small project is much better than doing it on your dream game. My first "real" coding project taught me way more than years of college in terms of how to actually write code. Plus, it'll get you some perspective on just how demanding solo game-dev can be, so that if you give up you'll at least have something to show for it.

Also, just in case your tutorials don't cover this (because I know a lot don't), make sure you:

1. Use a version control system (like git) along with a web host (like Github or Bitbucket). Not only does this give you online backups so you never lose your code, but it also lets you define what are basically code "checkpoints". So that whenever something breaks (and it very likely will), you can easily check what you changed since the last working version, or as a last resort just delete all of these changes to get back to the last working version.

2. Write tests. No one likes doing it, but everyone at some point in the project wishes they did. It will make your life a thousand times easier when working on such a large project.

If you're going to actually code things instead of just using Unreal blueprints, I'd also recommend maybe checking out Unity (or even Game Maker if you're doing 2d stuff). Unreal Engine uses C++ for the code part, and that's pretty much the worst language for a beginner to use in my opinion. It just gives you too many options to break things, and has a ton of hidden complexity that's hard to grasp even for more experienced programmers.
This all really helps a lot, thanks!
 

vestan

Member
Dec 28, 2017
12,751
Maybe do small small small scale personal projects before tackling something like a fighting game. Even a game like Footsies is a huge undertaking if you're new to gamedev.

Then again, even if you don't complete this game you'll learn a shitload and having the motivation is the most important part.
☝
 

Lunaray

Member
Oct 27, 2017
1,431
Then again, even if you don't complete this game you'll learn a shitload and having the motivation is the most important part.
This. People can be pretty negative but if you go into it with the mindset that the learning process is more important then delivering a professional quality game, you can't fail.
 

Pasha

Member
Jan 27, 2018
1,409
Don't listen to the negative nancys in this thread, the important thing is to start the project and dedicate yourself. Even if you come short, it doesn't matter, the experience you'll earn in the process might be something that will help you in life/career.

Maybe try to find a community on the internet that is doing similar things, where you can find like-minded people to bounce ideas back and forth, or just in general seek advice.

Also, don't forget to have fun while you're doing it.
 

EduBRK

Member
Oct 30, 2017
198
I also wish you luck, but I need to stress, there's some GOOD advice already on this page. Don't try to create your magnum opus without failling sometimes (actually, lot of times, but I'm trying to keep things positive here)...
 
OP
OP
Kalmakov

Kalmakov

Member
Sep 10, 2019
806
I also wish you luck, but I need to stress, there's some GOOD advice already on this page. Don't try to create your magnum opus without failling sometimes (actually, lot of times, but I'm trying to keep things positive here)...
I don't expect to make the best game I could make right off the bat, I'm more than ready to fail over and over.
 

HotHamBoy

Member
Oct 27, 2017
12,928
Not to be rude, but, uh...

...No you're not.

Edit: actually, allow me to be more helpful: 100% learn to make much, much simpler, smaller games first. Because going straight for a fighting game with zero experience in making games will result in nothing.
This. People can be pretty negative but if you go into it with the mindset that the learning process is more important then delivering a professional quality game, you can't fail.
If you truly value the learning process then you should try to learn the right way. Start with small, easily manageable solo projects that can be completed in short time frames.

Trying to learn this way is going to be far less effective, if it's effective at all. You're filling your head with a whole bunch of shit concerns you don't need to be worried about yet because you're trying to run before you can walk.

Baby steps, first.
 
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EduBRK

Member
Oct 30, 2017
198
Have you ever tried to mess with MUGEN OP? It may give you a hint of what's to come. And maybe you could prototype some things with it.