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SpaceX |OT| Reusable Rockets - To Mars!

Oct 28, 2017
1,369
Not entirely on topic, but I thought a few here might like to pour one out to Kepler.

https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?feature=7272

A great job well done.
I'm constantly amazed how far some of these missions are pushed. Kepler observed some 530,506 stars and found the following -

All Exoplanets
3826

Confirmed Planets with Kepler Light Curves for Stellar Host
2344

Confirmed Planets Discovered by Kepler
2327

Kepler Project Candidates Yet To Be Confirmed
2426


Confirmed Planets with K2 Light Curves for Stellar Host
376

Confirmed Planets Discovered by K2
354

K2 Candidates Yet To Be Confirmed
473

Source
 
Oct 26, 2017
6,617
Tuning in for the launch and downloaded the doco.

Bahh humbug. I literally only care about them landing the damned thing and they lost the feed lol
 
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Dan

Member
Oct 25, 2017
3,466
According the Chris from NSF, Boeing seems to be pretty stuck.

What we know about this is that there was quite a serious anomaly in the firing of the CST launch abort engines (I think there was a major leak of hypergolic fuel after shutdown). This was in June. Boeing at the time said it had addressed the issue. Unless it's another thing that is obviously much more of an issue.
 
Oct 26, 2017
6,617
Nice. Whats the plan for the mission? Just into orbit and back down?

EDIt: oh no, dock with ISS for a few weeks then re-enter. Apparently that capsule will be used for an in flight abort test later on.
 

Dan

Member
Oct 25, 2017
3,466
Nice. Whats the plan for the mission? Just into orbit and back down?

EDIt: oh no, dock with ISS for a few weeks then re-enter. Apparently that capsule will be used for an in flight abort test later on.
Yep, they're going to use it as a cargo type mission but mainly its proving it in a complete CRS mission lifecycle, including (and its a big one) the automated docking system. The Soyuz-FG returning to flight with the recent Progress mission was important, as it would mean that the next Soyuz crew could go up, and thus there are people on the station ready to supervise the Crew Dragon docking and take over if necessary.
 

Dan

Member
Oct 25, 2017
3,466
There's a conspiracy theory going around that this has been pushed by some who want Boeing CST to be the first crewed commercial mission to "grab the flag" left by the Shuttle.
 

Dan

Member
Oct 25, 2017
3,466
Soyuz MS-11 successfully launched today to the ISS. Manned return to flight for the vehicle after their anomaly.

This bodes well for the DM-1 mission NET January 8th from LC39A.
 
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Crispy75
Oct 25, 2017
738
Updated the OP a bit. Latest BFR/Starliner info, old F9 models retired, deleted the launch/landing/failure counts cos I can't be bothered updating them all the time (and hadn't since May anyway!)

Launch today at 18:30 UTC (local time) is SSO-A, a rideshare mission for 64 (sixty four!) small satellites into a sun-synchronous orbit (one where the sun is in the same position relative to the ground, each time the satellite passes over). It will be the *third* flight for this particular booster. Live stream here:

 
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Crispy75
Oct 25, 2017
738
Well, era was all sorts of broken during the launch, but everything went perfectly. That booster has now launched from all three of SpaceX's launch sites. It was their 64th launch and their 32nd landing.
 
Oct 27, 2017
516
Looks like they pulled them out fast enough that Musk says they can reuse them. I'm not saying they will reuse them, only that Musk thinks they look good. Maybe they didn't get any water on the inside of the fairings?
 
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Crispy75
Oct 25, 2017
738
If you live in Europe and the skies are clear tomorrow night, you might be able to see Dragon fly across the sky after the launch.

Go here: https://spotthestation.nasa.gov/sightings/ and put your city in to find out where the ISS pass will be in your sky.
The exact same conditions apply tomorrow evening this year too :) - If you have a visible pass of the station after 18:30 UTC then you should be able to see Dragon pass over too.
 

Dan

Member
Oct 25, 2017
3,466
RIP B1050. We hardly knew you :(

I think it may have caught a gust of wind?

Either way, they needed to land it in the water - cutting away helped just in case they were not successful there.

Primary mission success - first land based landing failure though :(
 
Oct 27, 2017
516
Everyday Astronaut showed footage from kspace academy (iirc) of almost the entire landing. Hope it doesn't affect their RTLS at Vandenburg, or in general.