• The site will be down for scheduled maintenance this Friday the 24th at 2AM PST / 5AM EST / 9AM UTC while we perform a software update. We expect this process to take up to 5 hours. Thank you for your understanding and patience. New features will be included.
  • Community Spotlight sign-ups are open once again for both Gaming and EtcetEra Hangout threads! If you want to shine a spotlight on your community, please register now.

SpaceX |OT| Reusable Rockets - To Mars!

Dan

Member
Oct 25, 2017
4,512
Sheeeiiiiit.

Sounds like there was an issue with the Super Draco thrusters. Orange smoke usually means hypergolics (this is what nerfed CST-100 right a few months).

Rumors are the capsule was "nearly destroyed"

:/
 

Dan

Member
Oct 25, 2017
4,512
That looks like a total loss of capsule. So many permutations to this re super dracos.

Elon's been quiet on Twitter - so that's a concern too.
 
Oct 25, 2017
3,053
Chesire, UK
Yeah, the abort system blowing up the capsule is gonna put SpaceX Commercial Crew back a looooooooooooooong way.

They were a good 6 months ahead of Boeing, maybe more. This is the sort of thing that could now put them years behind.
 

Dan

Member
Oct 25, 2017
4,512
Really early speculation by me, but I wonder if either the re-entry or landing in sea did something to the internals of the fuel system and/or the Super Dracos themselves. from what I understand, all the thrusters share a prop loop network between them all - I am concerned that firing up the Super Dracos after use for preparation for the inflight abort was a mistake - in fact using a used capsule for the abort a mistake on its own.

If it was something like the above, a potential option would be to split the super draco loop away from dracos, and then essentially creating a LES loop - for which they could safe when they reached orbit, dump the propellent and then use the dracos as normal from there.

Either way, I'm massively bummed out by this news.
 

Dan

Member
Oct 25, 2017
4,512
More talk online pointing to a COPV failure. Maybe salt water ingestion post landings may be involved too.

NASA and SpaceX were already aware of fuel line heating required between DM1 and DM2, and small issues revolving around COPVs.
 
Oct 27, 2017
680
Uhhh, pretty sure that's just the Arabsat launch getting replayed for clicks. Last I checked the center core for the Air Force mission was getting test fired in Texas just a few days ago.
 

Ron Paul

It's Happening
Moderator
Oct 25, 2017
5,874
Texas
I think next month I’m going to take a drive to the Boca Chica site. Would be cool to see a rocket on the pad but if not I’ll just snap some pictures of the empty site. Will be cool just to say I’ve checked it out
 
Oct 27, 2017
680
I watch pretty much all the launches so Youtube likes to recommend all those clickbait live videos to me, so I'm used to seeing them.

Btw, there's a real SpaceX launch in a hour or two, CRS-17. They had to switch the landing site from RTLS to a drone ship just off shore because they're still dealing with the Dragon 2 capsule explosion cleanup. Apparently the landing booster should be partially visible over the horizon after landing, would be a great shot for flat-earthers if it wasn't so late at night in Florida.
 
Oct 25, 2017
3,053
Chesire, UK
Rocket go up, rocket come down. Dragon on it's way to the ISS.


Very pretty night launch, you can really see just how much of a toasting the 1st stage gets when the 2nd stage lights up.

Also an awesome infrared camera shot of the drone ship landing, followed by a live ride all the way down since the ASDS was just off shore and they didn't have to rely on garbage satellite reception.
 
Oct 26, 2017
1,158
EDIT: Original post below. I posted something old as new by mistake.

They've just recovered the three boosters for the first time. Both lateral boosters on land AND the central one on a barge.
 
Last edited:
Oct 27, 2017
680
They've just recovered the three boosters for the first time. Both lateral boosters on land AND the central one on a barge.
Whatever livestream you're watching has about a two week lag. Don't want to spoil anything but the Atlantic in spring isn't exactly glass. It was a hell of a launch though.

Last night's launch was a regular Falcon 9, but it was still pretty cool.
 
Oct 26, 2017
1,158
God damn my notifications betrayed me then. Thank you. I'll edit and clarify the post so nobody gets confused. It's the same Arabsat clickbait.
 
Oct 26, 2017
2,669
First Starlink launch on Wednesday. 60 satellites in one go.

Wow, I hope they will be able to deploy them all. Will the last stage taxi them all out to their orbit, or will satelites get into place individually with onboard fuel?

As someone who can only get 13mbit internet connection at my house, I can't wait to see how this tech will eventually end up performing, both in bandwidth and latency.
 
OP
OP
Crispy75
Oct 25, 2017
879
We don't know what deployment strategy they'll be using for this first launch. 60 is a lot for a single orbital plane, so I suspect the 2nd stage will have enough fuel left over to make one or two plane changes.

These won't be fully operational anyway. Gwynne has already confirmed that this batch don't have satellite to satellite comms. Literally just a test of deployment, fleet operations and ground stations. Not the full network.
 
Oct 28, 2017
1,361
Wow, I hope they will be able to deploy them all. Will the last stage taxi them all out to their orbit, or will satelites get into place individually with onboard fuel?
Apparently some kind of crazy spin maneuver
https://arstechnica.com/science/201...ellites-and-deploy-them-like-a-deck-of-cards/
In order to save mass, each of the 60 satellites will not have its own release mechanism, such as a spring. Instead, Musk explained, the Falcon rocket's upper stage will begin a very slow rotation, and each of the satellites will be released in turn with a different amount of rotational inertia.

"It will almost seem like spreading a deck of cards on a table," Musk said. There may actually be some contact between the Starlink satellites, he added, but they are designed to handle it.
I hope they get some cool video of that
 
Oct 27, 2017
680
And they're live.

And they're not.

Oh well, looking forward to tomorrow. Everyday astronaut said they're planning on showing the satellite deployment so I'm looking forward to that.
 
OP
OP
Crispy75
Oct 25, 2017
879
The extra budget required to make this a reality has not been appropriated, and the WH has made Congress choose between (not enough) money to accelerate the moon programme OR not raid a fund for education of disadvantaged children. It will not get funded, and NASA is not going to the moon in 2024, or ever at this rate.