Stephen King |OT| - Era Ka-Tet

NameUser

Member
Oct 25, 2017
7,783
Full Dark No Stars was the first King Book i read :^D
It was awesome i didn't knew what to expect at first it kinda feels different from other King stories the atmosphere was awesome and characters very gray, i saw the movie recently while it cuts some parts from the story it looks exactly as i pictured the novel

Enjoyed Revival but not as much as others because its not really an horror story until the very end,stuff with father jacob was interesting but most of the book is really about a dude starting a band, i felt it dragged on could have been a better short story or novella in a collection.

It would make a great movie though, with the worst filler cut, and that ending
I love it because it's a slow burn. There's little hints about the madness that awaits the reader in the final act, then it just hits you hard. It would work better in movie form, though. Because a lot of the "filler" could be condensed into a montage.

But I do think it's a horror story. Just not one that starts out with insane scares. It's more of something that creeps up on you.
 

Hokahey

Banned
Oct 28, 2017
2,046
Stephen King is my favorite author. As a younger kid, I loved short, scary stories. I happened upon Nightmares and Dreamscapes when it was released and I was hooked. I probably read 1 King book a month. Don't sleep on his kid Joe Hill. He's really coming in to his own. His short story collection "20th Century Ghosts" contains a few stories up there with his dad's best.
 

saenima

Member
Oct 25, 2017
10,076
I finally started reading King seriously a few months ago. Started with The Stand and am reading through the Dark Tower series, currently on the third book. I'm really, really loving them so far. Such fascinating books. I had read The Shining when i was a teenager and didn't think much of it tbh. But i intend to finish the series and i really want to read It as well. Also own Joyland and The Green Mile already so i'll most likely read them. After that, which books would be the strongest? I'm guessing more obvious things like Misery and Carrie, but are there any less known books that really stand out and demand to be read?
 

PurpleRainz

Member
Oct 27, 2017
1,655
I finally started reading King seriously a few months ago. Started with The Stand and am reading through the Dark Tower series, currently on the third book. I'm really, really loving them so far. Such fascinating books. I had read The Shining when i was a teenager and didn't think much of it tbh. But i intend to finish the series and i really want to read It as well. Also own Joyland and The Green Mile already so i'll most likely read them. After that, which books would be the strongest? I'm guessing more obvious things like Misery and Carrie, but are there any less known books that really stand out and demand to be read?
It's an unpopular thing to say but I think Hearts in Atlantis is his best work like the very best to me anyway. It's got a lot of heart and it's got a strong message to it as well it's an anti war book which makes some people dislike it but it's also got no horror elements at all so people just write it off as boring I know I did for about 20 years finally read it two years ago it's my favorite book of all time.
 
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Dalek

Dalek

Banned
Oct 25, 2017
12,121
Stephen King is my favorite author. As a younger kid, I loved short, scary stories. I happened upon Nightmares and Dreamscapes when it was released and I was hooked. I probably read 1 King book a month. Don't sleep on his kid Joe Hill. He's really coming in to his own. His short story collection "20th Century Ghosts" contains a few stories up there with his dad's best.
Joe Hill wrote the great comic book Locke and Key which is being made into a TV series by Netflix!

 
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Dalek

Dalek

Banned
Oct 25, 2017
12,121
Can we talk about the most upsetting deaths in his books? Because the one that hit me hardest and still haunts me to this day is

Eddie. I started reading Dark Tower when I was 12 years old and I read the final book when I was a grown married man. I read those books throughout my life and even when there wasn't a new installment, it was in my head and I thought about the characters. Eddie's death was very real to me and ripped my heart out.
 

Dream Machine

Member
Oct 25, 2017
9,596
On Writing and Danse Macabre are both excellent. I read them both at the beginning of college and they really helped me appreciate and understand writing and horror more than I had before.
I finally started reading King seriously a few months ago. Started with The Stand and am reading through the Dark Tower series, currently on the third book. I'm really, really loving them so far. Such fascinating books. I had read The Shining when i was a teenager and didn't think much of it tbh. But i intend to finish the series and i really want to read It as well. Also own Joyland and The Green Mile already so i'll most likely read them. After that, which books would be the strongest? I'm guessing more obvious things like Misery and Carrie, but are there any less known books that really stand out and demand to be read?
All of his short story collections are a must. Some of his very best stories are in those, and they completely avoid King's biggest failing for a lot of people: going on too long and not knowing how to wrap things up.

Insomnia and Salem's Lot would be good ones to read after you finish the Dark Tower series.
 

saenima

Member
Oct 25, 2017
10,076
It's an unpopular thing to say but I think Hearts in Atlantis is his best work like the very best to me anyway. It's got a lot of heart and it's got a strong message to it as well it's an anti war book which makes some people dislike it but it's also got no horror elements at all so people just write it off as boring I know I did for about 20 years finally read it two years ago it's my favorite book of all time.
I saw the movie but don't remember much about it. Only kinda the ending and that Hopkins was pretty alright in it, as he tends to be.

All of his short story collections are a must. Some of his very best stories are in those, and they completely avoid King's biggest failing for a lot of people: going on too long and not knowing how to wrap things up.

Insomnia and Salem's Lot would be good ones to read after you finish the Dark Tower series.
Thanks, that's good to know. Speaking of his shorter stuff, Stand by Me and Shawshank Redemption are two of my favorite movies :)

I think i'll start with Different Seasons and both of your recs and go from there. After The Dark Tower ofc.
 
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Bran-dono

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Aug 22, 2018
1,227
Good place to share my thoughts on The Stand.

There will be spoilers.

****

I read The Stand over the summer of last year.

I was in for it. Harold's arc is something else. So is Larry's (but only early on).

However, while the story starts off strong and has numerous great scenes and moments, the finale is truly lackluster.

It goes nowhere and even if that was the point, which I suspect it was, it was still dissatisfying. Most of the men simply die and their deaths feel like they're in vein (Nick, Larry, the professor).

King spends most of the first part building up Larry and it feels like he just takes a backseat then dies. Nick dies and it feels like he was supposed to play a bigger role.

And then the Hardcase/Walter O'Dim/The Walkin Dude/The Man in Black just vanishes and pops up elsewhere in the world (in location and possibly in time) to plot once more.

For a 1,000 plus page investment it wasn't worth it.

That said it still has it's strong points, and those highs are very high.

I will say though that the references to the book made at the end of DT III and in DT IV are very cool. I just wish the story would have turned out differently.
 
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Dalek

Dalek

Banned
Oct 25, 2017
12,121
Good place to share my thoughts on The Stand.

There will be spoilers.

****

I read The Stand over the summer of last year.

I was in for it. Harold's arc is something else. So is Larry's (but only early on).

However, while the story starts off strong and has numerous great scenes and moments, the finale is truly lackluster.

It goes nowhere and even if that was the point, which I suspect it was, it was still dissatisfying. Most of the men simply die and their deaths feel like they're in vein (Nick, Larry, the professor).

King spends most of the first part building up Larry and it feels like he just takes a backseat then dies. Nick dies and it feels like he was supposed to play a bigger role.

And then the Hardcase/Walter O'Dim/The Walkin Dude/The Man in Black just vanishes and pops up elsewhere in the world (in location and possibly in time) to plot once more.

For a 1,000 plus page investment it wasn't worth it.

That said it still has it's strong points, and those highs are very high.

I will say though that the references to the book made at the end of DT III and in DT IV are very cool. I just wish the story would have turned out differently.
The Stand is a great book-but ultimately the perfect example of King's weaknesses. Too much filler and an anti-climatic ending.

That said, the original version is 600 pages-the "uncut" is over 1000. Sometimes editing is best.
 

Bran-dono

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Aug 22, 2018
1,227
The Stand is a great book-but ultimately the perfect example of King's weaknesses. Too much filler and an anti-climatic ending.
Truly, and reading it after reading The Drawing of the Three, the best work I've read from him, just underscored the weaknesses of The Stand.
 

RepairmanJack

Member
Oct 27, 2017
4,841
Can we talk about the most upsetting deaths in his books? Because the one that hit me hardest and still haunts me to this day is

Eddie. I started reading Dark Tower when I was 12 years old and I read the final book when I was a grown married man. I read those books throughout my life and even when there wasn't a new installment, it was in my head and I thought about the characters. Eddie's death was very real to me and ripped my heart out.
Was going to guess
Oy.

That shit was rough. "Olan" :(

The Dark Tower is the best ending King has ever written. Will fight over this.
 

Dream Machine

Member
Oct 25, 2017
9,596
Thanks, that's good to know. Speaking of his shorter stuff, Stand by Me and Shawshank Redemption are two of my favorite movies :)

I think i'll start with Different Seasons and both of your recs and go from there. After The Dark Tower ofc.
Of course. I actually prefer his collections like Night Shift and Skeleton Crew because the individual stories are so short that you can easily take them down in one sitting.

I would recommend Night Shift after you read Salem's Lot because it has two stories in it that bookend that novel.
 

Number45

Member
Oct 25, 2017
2,522

saenima

Member
Oct 25, 2017
10,076
Of course. I actually prefer his collections like Night Shift and Skeleton Crew because the individual stories are so short that you can easily take them down in one sitting.

I would recommend Night Shift after you read Salem's Lot because it has two stories in it that bookend that novel.
Added both.

On another note, just got 'It' from Audible. I think i'll sneak it inbetween The Dark Tower books. I saw the recent movie and liked the ideas and the character much more than the movie itself, and since i found out the movie is only half the story i've been itching to read the book and see where it goes. This thread finally convinced me to pull the trigger.
 
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Dalek

Dalek

Banned
Oct 25, 2017
12,121
Is this worth reading if I have no plans on starting to write? If nothing else it'd be a great thing for my daughter to read as she's into writing (has had a couple of very short stories published locally).


No lies detected.
It is absolutely worth reading. It's divided into basically 3 parts:

1. He talks about his early life and the experiences that shaped his life. He talks about struggling to make ends meet and writing books in the laundry room of his trailer. It is incredible. The scene where he gets a call from his agent to learn that the paperback rights to Carrie were sold for $400,000 brought tears to my eyes.
2. He talks about the style and form of writing-it's not dry. It's less about grammar and more about meaning, substance. I'll post my favorite part from it in a bit.
3. He talks in detail for the first time about his car accident that *should* have killed him. It's brutal and heartbreaking. Ultimately in the end it all comes back to writing-and how he used that to preserve and center himself after the accident, surgeries and agonizing PT.

Anyways-this is text from the second section that someone illustrated - this art is not in the book, mind you-but the words are.


 

napk1ns

Member
Nov 29, 2017
154
Full Dark No Stars was the first King Book i read :^D
It was awesome i didn't knew what to expect at first it kinda feels different from other King stories the atmosphere was awesome and characters very gray, i saw the movie recently while it cuts some parts from the story it looks exactly as i pictured the novel

Enjoyed Revival but not as much as others because its not really an horror story until the very end,stuff with father jacob was interesting but most of the book is really about a dude starting a band, i felt it dragged on could have been a better short story or novella in a collection.

It would make a great movie though, with the worst filler cut, and that ending
This is one of the troubles of artist branding. Just because Revival isn’t overtly horrific for the first 100 pages doesn’t mean it’s quality is any more reduced than, say, The Stand, which gets very bloody very quickly. In fact, Revival better mirrors the structure of 19th century horror writers than many of his other works, and the creeping strangeness in the book, my opinion only, helps accentuate the more severe horror that comes later.

This suggestion that the book is about a “dude starting a band” is not accurate. It’s about the collapse of faith and science as the real miracle worker, to dismiss those things in the early throws of the novel feels slighting.
 
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RepairmanJack

Member
Oct 27, 2017
4,841
Revival is in my top 5 of King books. I have a profound love for it.

Also for not having a huge horror focus it probably has one of the most horror type things that have stuck with me from any of his books.

Something.....happened.....something.....happened.

Not sure why but something about that fucking sticks with me so much.
 

Herb Alpert

Member
Oct 25, 2017
4,964
Paris, France
My favorite King stories are probably "it" and the long walk.
I really loved the first 4 books of the dark tower then was disappointed by the last ones.

"It" was and remain one of the best depiction in fiction of the loss of innocence and the end of childhood. I read it almost 30 years ago and it still haunts me...
 

napk1ns

Member
Nov 29, 2017
154
Revival is in my top 5 of King books. I have a profound love for it.

Also for not having a huge horror focus it probably has one of the most horror type things that have stuck with me from any of his books.

Something.....happened.....something.....happened.

Not sure why but something about that fucking sticks with me so much.
Totally man. I don’t know how to do spoilers on mobile so very light Revival spoilers:

!!

The concept of not remembering your own behavior is so freaky to me. The scene of the guy sitting in a chair and all at once being at the far end of the hotel room, facing the corner - spooky stuff.
 

lasthope106

Member
Oct 25, 2017
495
Iowa USA
So a question for you Stephen King aficionados, what are his most Lovecraftian-like stories? I'm making progress on IT and bought Revival to read next.
 

Sub Boss

Member
Nov 14, 2017
10,984
This is one of the troubles of artist branding. Just because Revival isn’t overtly horrific for the first 100 pages doesn’t mean it’s quality is any more reduced than, say, The Stand, which gets very bloody very quickly. In fact, Revival better mirrors the structure of 19th century horror writers than many of his other works, and the creeping strangeness in the book, my opinion only, helps accentuate the more severe horror that comes later.

This suggestion that the book is about a “dude starting a band” is not accurate. It’s about the collapse of faith and science as the real miracle worker, to dismiss those things in the early throws of the novel feels slighting.
Well i liked it, just that the whole guitar band took precedence over the other themes , at times it felt like i was reading two different stories and the truly supernarural horror wasn't that scary (after reading other King books)
i just said it could work better as a short novel or movie. frankly the Shining was a bit long too imo :^S

But i enjoyed it to reach the end :P
 

Number45

Member
Oct 25, 2017
2,522
It is absolutely worth reading. It's divided into basically 3 parts:

1. He talks about his early life and the experiences that shaped his life. He talks about struggling to make ends meet and writing books in the laundry room of his trailer. It is incredible. The scene where he gets a call from his agent to learn that the paperback rights to Carrie were sold for $400,000 brought tears to my eyes.
2. He talks about the style and form of writing-it's not dry. It's less about grammar and more about meaning, substance. I'll post my favorite part from it in a bit.
3. He talks in detail for the first time about his car accident that *should* have killed him. It's brutal and heartbreaking. Ultimately in the end it all comes back to writing-and how he used that to preserve and center himself after the accident, surgeries and agonizing PT.

Anyways-this is text from the second section that someone illustrated - this art is not in the book, mind you-but the words are.


Thanks for this, I’ve added it to my list.
 

GRW810

Member
Oct 27, 2017
877
Has King revealed - either specifically or vaguely - what he's working on for the near future?

He's usually quite open and has two or three projects on the go in various stages of completion but I've heard of nothing beyond Elevation. Even his own website lists nothing in the 'upcoming projects' section.
 
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Dalek

Dalek

Banned
Oct 25, 2017
12,121
Has King revealed - either specifically or vaguely - what he's working on for the near future?

He's usually quite open and has two or three projects on the go in various stages of completion but I've heard of nothing beyond Elevation. Even his own website lists nothing in the 'upcoming projects' section.
Nothing yet-all the news was regarding him releasing two books this year and Castle Rock on Hulu.
 

RepairmanJack

Member
Oct 27, 2017
4,841
Has King revealed - either specifically or vaguely - what he's working on for the near future?

He's usually quite open and has two or three projects on the go in various stages of completion but I've heard of nothing beyond Elevation. Even his own website lists nothing in the 'upcoming projects' section.
With two bigger books and Elevation in one year, might just be a longer window for now. Especially with Outsider and Elevation coming at the end of the year.
 

TheBeardedOne

Banned
Oct 27, 2017
22,189
Derry
How is Bag of Bones? I ended up with multiple copies of it and want to give one to my dad. Thing is, he's not really into horror.

I read something today that said it wasn't too scary, but wanted to doublecheck.
 

ThisOne

Member
Oct 27, 2017
695
Anybody read The Plant? I read about half of it as a teenager and never finished it as it was released in parts. I'm not sure if it ever even technically was completed by King.
 

CrichtonKicks

Member
Oct 25, 2017
2,335
Any "modern" King (say, 2005 to now) with similar feeling to old school king (say up to "It")? Finishing up Mr. Mercedes and I'm kind of in the mood for something from the original King era but, unfortunately, I've already read all of that. Haven't read much modern King though. Just Duma Key, Revival, 11/22/63, and now Mr. Mercedes.

Also, what's the consensus on the two follow-ups to Mr. Mercedes? Really enjoying it but it doesn't feel like something that would sustain a trilogy.
 

RepairmanJack

Member
Oct 27, 2017
4,841
Any "modern" King (say, 2005 to now) with similar feeling to old school king (say up to "It")? Finishing up Mr. Mercedes and I'm kind of in the mood for something from the original King era but, unfortunately, I've already read all of that. Haven't read much modern King though. Just Duma Key, Revival, 11/22/63, and now Mr. Mercedes.

Also, what's the consensus on the two follow-ups to Mr. Mercedes? Really enjoying it but it doesn't feel like something that would sustain a trilogy.
It depends on what you mean by feeling. As for as stuff like the scope of the story or the cast of the story I'd say Sleeping Beauties and Under the Dome feel closer to the old style. Large casts, weird happenings, shitty people, and good people with problems dealing with the shitty people.
 

PurpleRainz

Member
Oct 27, 2017
1,655
Any "modern" King (say, 2005 to now) with similar feeling to old school king (say up to "It")? Finishing up Mr. Mercedes and I'm kind of in the mood for something from the original King era but, unfortunately, I've already read all of that. Haven't read much modern King though. Just Duma Key, Revival, 11/22/63, and now Mr. Mercedes.

Also, what's the consensus on the two follow-ups to Mr. Mercedes? Really enjoying it but it doesn't feel like something that would sustain a trilogy.

If you like novellas and short stories check out Just After Sunset and Full Dark No Stars. Full Dark No Stars even has a story set in Derry and Just After Sunset has one of his best short stories in it called N.
 

CrichtonKicks

Member
Oct 25, 2017
2,335
It depends on what you mean by feeling. As for as stuff like the scope of the story or the cast of the story I'd say Sleeping Beauties and Under the Dome feel closer to the old style. Large casts, weird happenings, shitty people, and good people with problems dealing with the shitty people.
You pretty much nailed it. I realliy should read Under the Dome as it sounds like the type of high concept epic that I love from King. I think I've held off after hearing the ending was abysmal even by King's normal standards.

If you like novellas and short stories check out Just After Sunset and Full Dark No Stars. Full Dark No Stars even has a story set in Derry and Just After Sunset has one of his best short stories in it called N.
Thanks- Full Dark No Stars has been on my radar. Four Past Midnight is one of my absolute favorite King works and FDNS seems to mirror the same structure.
 

PurpleRainz

Member
Oct 27, 2017
1,655
You pretty much nailed it. I realliy should read Under the Dome as it sounds like the type of high concept epic that I love from King. I think I've held off after hearing the ending was abysmal even by King's normal standards.



Thanks- Full Dark No Stars has been on my radar. Four Past Midnight is one of my absolute favorite King works and FDNS seems to mirror the same structure.

I hope you enjoy it's great and people say King lost his edge but Full Dark No Stars is all about the worst kinds of people.
 

Mariachi507

Member
Oct 26, 2017
1,476
Pet Sematary is awesome so far. Fear is subjective and all, but some of these passages are getting to me at times. I'm currently at the spot where Louis
is mistreating his zombified cat. The dream where he killed it and buried it even deeper fucked me up. That's the kind of nightmares I occasionally get."]

Looking forward to what's next, and then again I'm not since I know what that kind of is.

edit: I put something in spoilers but it's not showing for me in the post?
 
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Oct 26, 2017
1,269
Pet Sematary is awesome so far. Fear is subjective and all, but some of these passages are getting to me at times. I'm currently at the spot where
Looking forward to what's next, and then again I'm not since I know what that kind of is.

edit: I put something in spoilers but it's not showing for me in the post?
Great that you’re liking it! There’s some chills-inducing shit in the back third of that book.

Also, very late in the book, one of my favorite passages in all of Kingdom. So... enjoy!
 

Number45

Member
Oct 25, 2017
2,522
Pet Sematary is awesome so far. Fear is subjective and all, but some of these passages are getting to me at times. I'm currently at the spot where
Looking forward to what's next, and then again I'm not since I know what that kind of is.

edit: I put something in spoilers but it's not showing for me in the post?
Your spoiler code has the whole spoiler in the spoiler title section. When you click the spoiler button the first box is for a title (that shows next to the word spoiler on the clickable link) and the second box is for the action spoiler. Example:

This is the actual spoiler text

Code (if you prefer to do it purely from the text editor):

Code:
[spoiler=this is the spoiler title]This is the actual spoiler text[/spoiler]
 

Mariachi507

Member
Oct 26, 2017
1,476
Your spoiler code has the whole spoiler in the spoiler title section. When you click the spoiler button the first box is for a title (that shows next to the word spoiler on the clickable link) and the second box is for the action spoiler. Example:

This is the actual spoiler text

Code (if you prefer to do it purely from the text editor):

Code:
[spoiler=this is the spoiler title]This is the actual spoiler text[/spoiler]
How silly of me, I should have figured that out. Thanks!
 

BackLogJoe

The Fallen
Oct 27, 2017
586
When I was a child, a teacher bought me a copy of Eyes of the Dragon and I was hooked. I'd give up a lot for a sequel to It.

The ending of The Dark Tower is the only piece of written work to make me physically throw a book across a room in tears.

I loved Oy.
 

holygeesus

Member
Oct 27, 2017
2,839
I'm reading the Outsider at the moment and enjoying it a lot I must admit. I've been a fan all my life and it blows my mind how he is still such an entertaining read all these years later, especially considering what his body and mind have been through (both self inflicted and otherwise).

Has he ever admitted which era of his work were written when his addictions were at their height? I'm presuming it was around the time of Tommyknockers et al? Which he apparently hated.
 

CrichtonKicks

Member
Oct 25, 2017
2,335
Has he ever admitted which era of his work were written when his addictions were at their height? I'm presuming it was around the time of Tommyknockers et al? Which he apparently hated.
Pretty sure that was the height of his addiction and he got sober shortly after that. Tommyknockers may be the book he said he has no recollection of writing. Or maybe it was Cujo?