Tennis shoes? Really?

astro

Member
Oct 25, 2017
17,050
I have never heard anyone outside the UK call them trainers. A trainer is someone who teaches you how to do something.
It's also a shoe, that you use for training. Or a shoe in the style of that type of shoe.

You do not just sneak in them, or sneak at all.
You do not just play tennis in them.
 

exodus

Member
Oct 25, 2017
2,937
Canadian here from Ottawa.

I’ve never heard tennis shoes and we typically don’t call them sneakers.

Running shoes is probably the most common, but they might be referred to differently depending on their purpose, such as cross trainers or basketball shoes.
 

kittens

Member
Oct 27, 2017
3,162
I've lived on the west coast my whole life and we definitely say sneakers too. Tennis shoes seems like an older generation term.
 

Strangelove77

Member
Oct 25, 2017
10,325
I’m in Texas and growing up I’ve always heard them called tennis shoes.
So does Mexico.
I just call everything “shoes.”

Btw calling them “trainers” is so much more dumb. That’s a guy that teaches how to do sports. Not a shoe.
 

Burt

Member
Oct 28, 2017
2,510
I’m in Texas and I’ve always called them tennis shoes.
So does Mexico.

Calling them “trainers” is so much more dumb. That’s a guy that teaches how to do sports. Not a shoe.
as opposed to calling shoes that are never and will never be used for tennis tennis shoes

I sneak in my sneakers all the time so now its settled
 

The Albatross

Member
Oct 25, 2017
8,730
From the northeast and I never called then tennis shoes, but I'm aware people in the rest of the country do.

I always called them sneakers. Always.

I know what 'tennis shoes' means but ... I've always thought it was weird. I think "Trainers" is equally strange. Training for what? Potty training? Pull-ups diapers? Sneakers seems to be something that makes sense, though I get how sneakers is a broad word, which is why we have modifies like "Running sneakers" "basketball sneakers" etc.

It's like knowing Tonic v. Pop v. Soda v. Coke v. whatever wherever you go but still thinking it's weird.

IT's another thing like how old people called shorts "Bermuda shorts."
 

Magnus

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,600
You hear a mix of terms in Toronto, but everyone knows what you're talking about. Tennis shoes though... That's strange.
 

The Albatross

Member
Oct 25, 2017
8,730
While I am surprised to find out its a purely northeastern thing to use the term 'sneakers' - I am more fascinated that there are two separate pockets of people who call water fountains... bubblers?

Bubbler is my favorite regionalism.

Bubbler was the first word that I realized was very normal for me, and other people thought I was weird. I have relatives that lived in Idaho and California, and when we all got together for a family reunion they made fun of us for saying bubbler as if it was the weirdest thing ever (it is), but I remember being like "Wtf do you call it?" And they said water fountain or drinking fountain or something, and I was like "oh... I.. I guess that makes a lot of sense..."

But fuck it bubbler for life.

Bubbler
soda (sometimes tonic but that's old people)
sneakers
chips
subs (used to call these grinders when I was a kid, but I've been normalized into subs)
hot dogs
Rotary
Yard sale

Trying to think of other weird regionalisms
 

WedgeX

Member
Oct 27, 2017
4,262
From Michigan and would definitely use tennis shoe to describe them. Secondly gym shoe, although I’ve got a bunch of Chicago ties.
 

Stat

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,220
In Canada, we call them Running Shoes. Like normal people.

Canadian here from Ottawa.

I’ve never heard tennis shoes and we typically don’t call them sneakers.

Running shoes is probably the most common, but they might be referred to differently depending on their purpose, such as cross trainers or basketball shoes.
100% running shoes if we are talking general athletic footwear vs. something more specific.
 

Burt

Member
Oct 28, 2017
2,510
That doesn’t make “trainers” any better though. Why change it at all if it’ll still be wrong?
Ask yourself that question, tennis-shoesy




They call them trainers because you use them when you're training, the same way you call them tennis shoes because they used to be used primarily for tennis.

You're both wrong SNEAKER GOD FOREVER
 

amanset

Member
Oct 28, 2017
772
Soccer was originally what it was called in England, too. They started it, but so many of them choose to forget it.
Urgh, this again.

What it was called was Association Football. Some people said "soccer" (a bit like how some people called Rugby Football "rugger"). Some people didn't. And it was never officially called that.
 

Shedinja

Member
Nov 30, 2017
1,172
This thread is eye opening. Never knew them as anything other than sneakers in English, but...

Tennis or Tennis shoes in Mexico. Well, in spanish, "Zapatos Tennis".
Same thing in Puerto Rico and I never understood why until now. In some places, people also call any brand of cereal “conflei” (corn flakes). Not sure how that started, though.
 

Edward

Avenger
Oct 30, 2017
1,489
I don't think i have met a single person where i live in TN call them anything but tennis shoes and i have never referred them to be anything other than that.

I guess it's like pop/soda/coke. Most people call every soda here coke.
 

SnakeXs

Member
Oct 28, 2017
750
In some places, people also call any brand of cereal “conflei” (corn flakes). Not sure how that started, though.
Can confirm for Greeks. All cartoons are/were Mickey Mouse, all cereal was cornflakes.

As for the footwear, I went from southern Sneaker territory to NE Sneakerland. Sneakers forever.
 

Mulciber

Member
Aug 22, 2018
2,846
I call all shoes "feet prisons" and only wear them when required. Right now my little toesies are free and happy.
 

Sobriquet

The Fallen
Oct 27, 2017
3,373
Wilmington, NC
I've lived in Georgia, Texas, Iowa, Illinois, California, Nevada, and North Carolina. They're called tennis shoes everywhere but Chicago, where they're called gym shoes.

This is weird considering a yard sale is in the yard and a garage sale is in the garage. That's the literal reason for the differences.
Except you can have a yard sale in a garage, and a garage sale in the yard, depending on where you live.
 

Dreamwriter

Member
Oct 27, 2017
3,291
The trick is, nobody calls them "Tennis Shoes", thus we don't think about the "Tennis" aspect. What we call them is "Tennishoes", one word.
 

Jest

Member
Oct 28, 2017
3,083
Tennishoes and Sneakers. But even Sneakers is hardly used anymore. I mostly hear the various sub genre's named. "Skate shoes," "Running shoes," "Basketball shoes," etc.. And in some cases they're just referred to by what they specifically are... such as "Jordans," or "Dunks (as in Nike Dunks)," or whatever.