Tennis shoes? Really?

Rei no Otaku

The Fallen
Oct 25, 2017
1,127
Cranston RI
Bubbler is my favorite regionalism.

Bubbler was the first word that I realized was very normal for me, and other people thought I was weird. I have relatives that lived in Idaho and California, and when we all got together for a family reunion they made fun of us for saying bubbler as if it was the weirdest thing ever (it is), but I remember being like "Wtf do you call it?" And they said water fountain or drinking fountain or something, and I was like "oh... I.. I guess that makes a lot of sense..."

But fuck it bubbler for life.

Bubbler
soda (sometimes tonic but that's old people)
sneakers
chips
subs (used to call these grinders when I was a kid, but I've been normalized into subs)
hot dogs
Rotary
Yard sale

Trying to think of other weird regionalisms
I'm from RI and it wasn't until I went to college that I realized most people don't use the term bubbler. Drinking fountain sounds too fancy and water fountains are those things in the mall you throw coins in. Not to mention all the other weird terms we have like cabinets and pizza strips.

About the topic though, it's sneakers. Tennis shoes just sounds funny.
 

Jon Carter

Member
Oct 27, 2017
3,230
It’s not just the U.S. I’m French and we call them “chaussures de tennis” (literally tennis shoes). Deal with it, OP.
 

Tragicomedy

Avenger
Oct 25, 2017
726
I think tennis shoes or the language equivalent is common around the world. I've heard it in many countries.

I've lived in every US time zone and it's always been tennis shoes. Hawaii is the exception in that everyone here wears "slippahs" (flip flops).
 

smurfx

Member
Oct 25, 2017
3,486
cali here and i called them tennis shoes growing up. although we did call certain shoes basketball shoes.
 

digit_zero

Member
Oct 27, 2017
495
Bubbler is my favorite regionalism.

Bubbler was the first word that I realized was very normal for me, and other people thought I was weird. I have relatives that lived in Idaho and California, and when we all got together for a family reunion they made fun of us for saying bubbler as if it was the weirdest thing ever (it is), but I remember being like "Wtf do you call it?" And they said water fountain or drinking fountain or something, and I was like "oh... I.. I guess that makes a lot of sense..."

But fuck it bubbler for life.

Bubbler
soda (sometimes tonic but that's old people)
sneakers
chips
subs (used to call these grinders when I was a kid, but I've been normalized into subs)
hot dogs
Rotary
Yard sale

Trying to think of other weird regionalisms
See how you feel about "bubbler" I feel about hoagie - if you want another weird regionalism.
 

ghostemoji

Member
Oct 27, 2017
2,261
It's kind of a one word blend... when I was a kid (growing up in Illinois), I thought they were called "tennershoes", because "tennis shoes" didn't make any sense to me because nobody I knew played tennis.
 

console lover

Member
Feb 19, 2018
5,654
This is not the real thing to shame Americans over, calling soft drinks "soda" as a slang is just so weird to me. What year is this? 1950?
 

Slick Butter

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,696
This is not the real thing to shame Americans over, calling soft drinks "soda" as a slang is just so weird to me. What year is this? 1950?
What? Do you just call them soft drinks in casual conversation or something?
That's like the weirdly robotic scientific industry term for soda. However I can agree "pop" sounds like something straight outta the '50s.
 

Sectorseven

Member
Oct 25, 2017
3,092
I always thought tennis shoes came first, and sneakers were kind of an evolution of them. So I call tennis shoes "tennis shoes" and sneakers "sneakers."

I call Chuck Taylors "Chuck Taylors."
 

enempi

Member
Mar 9, 2018
309
This is very strange to me. For the people who just call everything “tennis shoes”, what do you call actual tennis shoes? As in trainers that are built to play tennis in specifically?

Maybe this is just because I’ve played tennis my whole life but tennis shoes means something separate than sneakers/trainers/running shoes to me. Tennis shoes are typically built with better lateral support since you mainly move side to side in tennis
 

1000% H

Member
Oct 25, 2017
4,249
What? Do you just call them soft drinks in casual conversation or something?
That's like the weirdly robotic scientific industry term for soda. However I can agree "pop" sounds like something straight outta the '50s.
As someone from a "pop" region, "soda" sounds way more ancient alongside soda parlors and the old fashioned style of soda fountains. Soda sounds like you walked up to a man at a bar with a curled mustache and a red striped shirt who put syrup into a glass cup and sprayed a tube of fizz on top of it.
 

Slick Butter

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,696
As someone from a "pop" region, "soda" sounds way more ancient alongside soda parlors and the old fashioned style of soda fountains. Soda sounds like you walked up to a man at a bar with a curled mustache and a red striped shirt who put syrup into a glass cup and sprayed a tube of fizz on top of it.
It seems users of one term think the other term sounds really old, haha. I don't have a problem with pop though, just sounds like a boomer word for soda. Probably a big part of it was my grandparents (born in the 40s) always said pop.

edit: From a brief search about the terms and their usage, they're both similarly ancient. Earliest known usage of pop is the very early 1800s and earliest known for soda appears to be the very late 1700s. They may have even both just split from the term "soda-pop."
 
Last edited:

Stinkles

343 Industries
Verified
Oct 25, 2017
13,536
You mean plimsolls? That's what everyone calls rubbers.

I'm just gonna enjoy this can of pop and think about what other refer to sasseparilla as. Atlanteans call 7up coke.
 
Oct 25, 2017
2,331
As someone from a "pop" region, "soda" sounds way more ancient alongside soda parlors and the old fashioned style of soda fountains. Soda sounds like you walked up to a man at a bar with a curled mustache and a red striped shirt who put syrup into a glass cup and sprayed a tube of fizz on top of it.
Soda makes more sense though. Soda is another term for Sodium Bicarbonate which gives soft drinks their fizz.
 

fester

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,063
It's fucking stupid. I grew up with sneakers in NJ and I'll allow gym shoes in Chicago, but there's no way in hell I'll refer to something as "tennis shoes" when tennis has absolutely nothing to do with anything.
 

Vilam

Member
Oct 27, 2017
1,509
Thought it was weird that I said sneakers based on that map, but then I saw that little spot of blue in Miami. Makes sense now.

They definitely aren't "trainers" - dumb name.
 

Lothar

Member
Oct 25, 2017
281
What are so many UK people training for? Why trainers?

I don't think I've heard that word for tennis shoes before this thread.
 

itwasTuesday

The Fallen
Oct 30, 2017
7,350
Tennishoes are like joggers.
Sneakers are like Dan Aykroyd.
Trainers are like when you go on a diet.
Kicks are like the other side of Kats.
 

The Llama

Member
Oct 27, 2017
507
As a Philadelphian I am totally capable of accepting that we have some unique words for stuff (like hoagie, as mentioned before) but learning that apparently most of the country regularly calls sneaks "tennis shoes" is absolutely blowing my mind. Like, I never see them referred to as "tennis shoes" anywhere. Hell, I just went on Nike.com and you can check the "SNKRS Launch Calendar" and then I went to Adidas.com and clicked through to the first random shoe I could find (https://www.adidas.com/us/ozweego-shoes/EE7008.html) and it refers to them as "sneakers."

Like I feel like I'm just being trolled by this and no one actually says "tennis shoes" because I just don't even see it anywhere.
 

Amathene

Avenger
Oct 27, 2017
259
Have you guys tried playing actual tennis with not actual tennis shoes? You'll blow your ankles out.