Tennis shoes? Really?

kvetcha

Member
Oct 27, 2017
5,196
The fuck. People down south call Orange Soda, Orange Coke? How the fuck does that work out?

I grew up in MA. Can confirm we call them bubblers lol
They don't call every single individual soda Coke, but they use the word Coke to refer to soda generally. 'Want a Coke?' 'Sure.' 'What kind?' 'You got Nehi?'

It's like calling all facial tissue Kleenex.
 

Mr Spasiba

Member
Oct 26, 2017
879
I say sneakers but I’m from South Florida so I guess that fits. Actually pretty much all of them fit for me except Y’all/you guys which I use both of because I think y’all is fun to say.

It’s funny that South Florida is some weird anomaly where we seem to just pick and choose different terms from different regions, but never stay in line with the rest of the south.
 

Matthew77

Avenger
Oct 29, 2017
2,394
Massachusetts
I feel like I've posted this a million times before, but the NY Times did this better years ago:


(it's actually from the same author but interactive and at least for me it is accurate to the nearest city, not just region)
This one is actually really good, it pegged me to Worcester, MA which is where I am from.
 

cinch

Member
Feb 17, 2019
65
I'm almost 50, have called them tennis shoes my entire life. "Sneakers" is barely acceptable and "trainers" is just plain weird.
 

TheZynster

Member
Oct 26, 2017
5,916
but i don't call them eith...........

"in Chicago or Cincinnati you might call it gym shoes"

fuck, thats accurate lol
 

Pillowtalk

Member
Oct 10, 2018
215
Norcal here. I always heard officials (teachers, tv anchors) call them tennis shoes, but I thought that sounded weird as hell since I never see anyone play tennis yet everyone wears these types of shoes. I always called them sneakers, or the specific shoe type they are.
 

Einbroch

Member
Oct 25, 2017
5,401
I feel like I've posted this a million times before, but the NY Times did this better years ago:


(it's actually from the same author but interactive and at least for me it is accurate to the nearest city, not just region)
This is scary.

I've lived in Idaho, Minnesota, Illinois, Georgia, Indiana, and Kansas, but I spent my formative years in Minnesota, and it nailed me as Minnesotan.
 

Hybris

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,731
We call them "tenny shoes" down in Louisiana. I never actually thought about how wrong that is until now...
 

vainya

Member
Dec 28, 2017
138
I feel like I've posted this a million times before, but the NY Times did this better years ago:


(it's actually from the same author but interactive and at least for me it is accurate to the nearest city, not just region)
That's pretty accurate. It had Newark, NJ (my home town) and Winston - Salem, NC (My maternal grandparents' home town) which is how I describe my accent to most people.
 

Dark Knight

Member
Oct 25, 2017
5,179
They don't call every single individual soda Coke, but they use the word Coke to refer to soda generally. 'Want a Coke?' 'Sure.' 'What kind?' 'You got Nehi?'

It's like calling all facial tissue Kleenex.
That's still weird to me.
"I want a Coke" "Alright, what kind? "I SAID COKE DAMNIT."

With Kleenex though there's no vast array of tissue flavors and types so it's not as confusing.
 

Version 3.0

Member
Oct 27, 2017
2,195
I feel like I've posted this a million times before, but the NY Times did this better years ago:


(it's actually from the same author but interactive and at least for me it is accurate to the nearest city, not just region)
Well, this didn't work very well. I was born in Minnesota, raised in Colorado, and it pegs me as Boise / Salt Lake City / Reno.

I'm not particularly surprised, though, as I've changed my pronunciation of many words over the years, and some of the words I use as well. If it had asked about how I spoke as a kid, I'm sure it would've nailed it.

For example, on topic, I only used and heard "tennis shoes", but the ubiquity of people saying "sneakers" around me now has me doing the same. I used the word "pop" growing up, but now say "soda" for the same reason. People making fun of me as a kid changed my pronunciation of "bag" and "aunt", among other words.

I was amazed at some of the weird choices on the quiz, though. "Kitty wampus"? "The wolf is giving birth"? People are fucking crazy.
 
Oct 30, 2017
318
I once got into an argument with a plant manager about this. He told me one day I couldn't wear tennis shoes on the plant floor (I was wearing Converse), so the next day I wore what were obviously, to me, sneakers and totally different from Converse which I guess he meant by tennis shoes. He blew his top at me and insisted I was fucking with him, but seriously I had no idea wtf he meant by tennis shoes. I'm from New York and was working in Ohio. The hell are tennis shoes?
 

Gaf Zombie

The Fallen
Dec 13, 2017
958
They're called gym shoes. Sugary fizzy drinks are called pops. Green Bay Packers are trash. Chi-Town checking in.
 

abellwillring

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,692
Austin, TX
mother fucker Jordan 1s ain’t tennis shoes

Who even plays tennis
Growing up in Florida, low-tops of any variety were always called tennis shoes. If you got high-tops, they were called basketball shoes. My mom would also use tennies as a few other people have mentioned in the thread.

I ain’t ever heard any southerner refer to soda in general as “coke”. These are lies, y’all.
I usually order a "coke" if I'm getting a fountain drink... regardless of what I plan to actually drink. It's a good catch all and usually there is Coke available. But in general I'll say soda -- I definitely wouldn't be like I'm drinking a coke if I'm drinking some Mountain Dew.
 
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Clay

Member
Oct 29, 2017
1,303
They are trained for combat and high stress situations. In those situations there is no time to be wasted on deciphering communications so everyone uses the same terminology for things so that nomenclature is not an issue. They're not doing that shit for laughs.
That makes sense to extent, but I'm not convinced that there are significant strategic benefits to mandating that tennis shoes be called "go-fasts." I really doubt that many misunderstandings over footwear during high stress situations have led to any sort of negative consequences.
 

Dolobill

Member
Oct 25, 2017
465
I'm from Eastern Canada and call them sneakers. I live in Western Canada and I think I usually hear people call them runners.
 

Maya Fey

The Fallen
Oct 25, 2017
476
All my life in the south I've never once heard soda in general called coke but I've lived in populated places.

Also in the south people say tenneysshoes, it's nasty
 

Coyote Zamora

Member
Jul 19, 2019
97
That makes sense to extent, but I'm not convinced that there are significant strategic benefits to mandating that tennis shoes be called "go-fasts." I really doubt that many misunderstandings over footwear during high stress situations have led to any sort of negative consequences.
On a boat, you don't think the proper choice of footwear at all times isn't important during a potential battle?
 

kubev

Member
Oct 25, 2017
2,405
Pacifica, CA
The quiz seems to think that I'm from the Las Vegas area. I was born in Indiana, but I also lived in North Carolina for a few years before living in Pennsylvania for a long time. I moved to California in 2011. And I've always said 'soda' and 'tennis shoes' for those items. I don't think I tie too much of what I say to where I grew up, though I *will* make exceptions for one or two examples of certain things. For example, I'd generally say 'creek' but will refer to a couple creeks close to where my dad lives as 'cricks' instead. I used to get called out for saying 'soda' all the time in Pennsylvania, but the only thing I generally get called out for in California is for how I pronounce 'buried' (burr-eed).
 

Duane

The Fallen
Oct 27, 2017
2,662
The fuck. People down south call Orange Soda, Orange Coke? How the fuck does that work out?

I grew up in MA. Can confirm we call them bubblers lol

I'm not kidding, when I got my first job years and years ago (at Captain D's 😩) my first day this happened:

Me, over the drive through intercom: Okay, so you want a 2 piece fish platter, anything else?
Them: Yeah, a Coke
Me: What kind of Coke?
Them: Strawberry
Me: Strawberry? Sorry ma'am, there's no Strawberry Coke. Do you mean Cherry Coke?
Them: Strawberry!
Me: But...
My co-worker: Move out of the way, dummy... Yes ma'am! Please pull around. (proceeds to fill up a cup of strawberry soda)
Me: But, that's not coke, that's strawberry pop! It's Welches!
Co-Worker: (rolls her eyes)


And for the rest of the time I worked there, it was the same every day...

Gimme a Coke
What kind?
Diet Coke.

Gimme a coke
What kind?
Sprite

What kind?
Mr Pibb

What kind?
Root beer

What kind?
Iced tea

I shit you not.
 

Clay

Member
Oct 29, 2017
1,303
On a boat, you don't think the proper choice of footwear at all times isn't important during a potential battle?
I absolutely think wearing the proper shoes is extremely important on a boat. Differentiating between different types of shoes during a heated moment, not so much. I imagine most enlisted people wear issued clothing, shoes included.
 

Coyote Zamora

Member
Jul 19, 2019
97
I absolutely think wearing the proper shoes is extremely important on a boat. Differentiating between different types of shoes during a heated moment, not so much. I imagine most enlisted people wear issued clothing, shoes included.
Enlisted, like officers receive several different types of footwear... Including specialty footwear for their duty station
 

Coyote Zamora

Member
Jul 19, 2019
97
And they often change shoes during combat? Still not getting your point.
I think your being willfully obtuse at this point. If you can't understand the two concepts of soldiers needing to be on the same page at all times and also their terminology needing to be used by all even if it's a term you don't like then I can't help you.

And yes their are times even during combat when a uniform is changed even down to the shoes.
 

1upsuper

Member
Jan 30, 2018
3,758
Someone has probably already mentioned this but it might be more accurate to say we call them tenni-shoes. Over time the "s" of tennis has dropped out in our pronunciation, or maybe it just got swallowed by the "sh" of shoes. I'm not a linguist.
 

Fatoy

Member
Mar 13, 2019
531
As a British guy, they've always been trainers to me. That feels right. They're shoes you do some kind of training in.

I spent a lot of time in France growing up, though, and I went to a French-speaking school. Over there they're called tennis shoes or, at least when I was a teenager, "baskets" - as in basketball shoes. Sometimes French kids also just call them "shoes," as in the English word, not "chaussures".