Tennis shoes? Really?

Nikus

Avenger
Oct 25, 2017
3,773
France
As a British guy, they've always been trainers to me. That feels right. They're shoes you do some kind of training in.

I spent a lot of time in France growing up, though, and I went to a French-speaking school. Over there they're called tennis shoes or, at least when I was a teenager, "baskets" - as in basketball shoes. Sometimes French kids also just call them "shoes," as in the English word, not "chaussures".
Yep, I'm french and I still call them baskets. And it's true we sometimes say "shoes", it was kinda in a tongue in cheek way at first but it became more natural for some.
The only one I know who calls them "tennis" is my grandmother who is almost 100 years old.
 

Clay

Member
Oct 29, 2017
1,303
I think your being willfully obtuse at this point. If you can't understand the two concepts of soldiers needing to be on the same page at all times and also their terminology needing to be used by all even if it's a term you don't like then I can't help you.

And yes their are times even during combat when a uniform is changed even down to the shoes.
I feel like I need citation for there ever being a time when a potential miscommunication regarding shoes ever made a difference in a battle. And also one for soldiers changing the types of shoes they're wearing in combat.

I feel your being willfully obtuse as well, I've already said I understand the general need for soldiers to be on the same page. If you don't find anything odd about the need for this to extent to shoes, pens, and other ordinary items, agree to disagree, not really interested in the nitpicking. And it's not that I don't like the term, it just seems ridiculous, it's more funny than anything. How many different kinds of shoes does a typical soldier carry with them to switch in and out of during live combat? Why not just use terms that are more concise like "shoes," "boots," "trainers," etc. Why "go-fasts" of all things? If you don't see any humor in the military landing on the terminology of an absent-minded child I don't know what to tell you.
 

Coyote Zamora

Member
Jul 19, 2019
97
I feel like I need citation for there ever being a time when a potential miscommunication regarding shoes ever made a difference in a battle. And also one for soldiers changing the types of shoes they're wearing in combat.

I feel your being willfully obtuse as well, I've already said I understand the general need for soldiers to be on the same page. If you don't find anything odd about the need for this to extent to shoes, pens, and other ordinary items, agree to disagree, not really interested in the nitpicking. And it's not that I don't like the term, it just seems ridiculous, it's more funny than anything. How many different kinds of shoes does a typical soldier carry with them to switch in and out of during live combat? Why not just use terms that are more concise like "shoes," "boots," "trainers," etc. Why "go-fasts" of all things? If you don't see any humor in the military landing on the terminology of an absent-minded child I don't know what to tell you.
Do you think fire team doesn't wear protective footwear on ships? Do you think fire uniform is the same as combat wear? Do you think there guys in CIC are in the same uniform as the diesel mechanics or nuclear technicians? What about topside watch? I get that you know zero about the military but think about it. If you're chilling in your class a uniform and you get the word from COB or your duty officer that you may expect hostilities then your going to change into what your rating calls for in battle dress. If something happens and you need to replace someone and the captain orders everyone into a certain uniform then yes you might need to change your shoes. Expecting fallout maybe you need to get into MOPP-4 which requires protective overboots.

Soldiers have whatever is issued to then for use for their duty rating, for some that means different footwear. Uniform means everything from top to bottom not just your shirt and pants. And yes, you have several different kinds of footwear.

You don't see how people not slipping and falling or having another vector for CBRN to incapacitate then doesn't save lives?

Use your head.
 

Clay

Member
Oct 29, 2017
1,303
Do you think fire team doesn't wear protective footwear on ships? Do you think fire uniform is the same as combat wear? Do you think there guys in CIC are in the same uniform as the diesel mechanics or nuclear technicians? What about topside watch? I get that you know zero about the military but think about it. If you're chilling in your class a uniform and you get the word from COB or your duty officer that you may expect hostilities then your going to change into what your rating calls for in battle dress. If something happens and you need to replace someone and the captain orders everyone into a certain uniform then yes you might need to change your shoes. Expecting fallout maybe you need to get into MOPP-4 which requires protective overboots.

Soldiers have whatever is issued to then for use for their duty rating, for some that means different footwear. Uniform means everything from top to bottom not just your shirt and pants. And yes, you have several different kinds of footwear.

You don't see how people not slipping and falling or having another vector for CBRN to incapacitate then doesn't save lives?

Use your head.
As I've explained repeatedly, I understand that different uses can be necessary in different situations.

As I've also explained repeatedly, what I find humorous is the idea that "go-fasts" was determined to be the ideal terminology for shoes.

All I'm saying is that I find it funny that a bunch of military professionals chose that term out of all the possibilities for a mandated word for tennis shoes. I have no idea why you feel the need to give me a lecture on military shoe protocol over this.

Again, since you seem to have trouble with this, I'm not saying the term is useless, or that shoes are unimportant (though I still have serious doubts that use of the term "go-fasts" ever lead to any significant military advantage), my main point was that I found the term funny. The thread is about what different people call tennis shoes/ sneakers, so I shared another term that I found amusing. Is that alright?

I also believe that terms like this are in part chosen to encourage socialization of new recruits. Dictating how you speak helps create a sense of community, and also establishes that you are no longer as free as you were as a civilian to act as you please. I don't know if that is what you disagree with? Still have no idea what you're trying to accomplish, I don't disagree with anything you've posted above.
 

RPTGB

Member
Oct 28, 2017
917
UK
Try running in proper tennis shoes for any length of time and you will feel the difference.
 

ChrisD

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,827
I know it must be weird for the small portion, but if it’s called one thing in 90% of the country then I’d say it’s the 10% that have the “weird name” lol

Called ‘em tennis shoes all my life
 

Coyote Zamora

Member
Jul 19, 2019
97
As I've explained repeatedly, I understand that different uses can be necessary in different situations.

As I've also explained repeatedly, what I find humorous is the idea that "go-fasts" was determined to be the ideal terminology for shoes.

All I'm saying is that I find it funny that a bunch of military professionals chose that term out of all the possibilities for a mandated word for tennis shoes. I have no idea why you feel the need to give me a lecture on military shoe protocol over this.

Again, since you seem to have trouble with this, I'm not saying the term is useless, or that shoes are unimportant (though I still have serious doubts that use of the term "go-fasts" ever lead to any significant military advantage), my main point was that I found the term funny. The thread is about what different people call tennis shoes/ sneakers, so I shared another term that I found amusing. Is that alright?

I also believe that terms like this are in part chosen to encourage socialization of new recruits. Dictating how you speak helps create a sense of community, and also establishes that you are no longer as free as you were as a civilian to act as you please. I don't know if that is what you disagree with? Still have no idea what you're trying to accomplish, I don't disagree with anything you've posted above.
Well, from my perspective it sure does seem like you were disagreeing with most of my points so I'll chalk things up to my stupidity.

As for the terminology, go-fasts started in the Marines. Why I don't know but the military has some long ass designation for running shoes or PT shoes. You'd be surprised how many things have a humorous nomenclatures to keep from quoting regs all day.
 

Clay

Member
Oct 29, 2017
1,303
Well, from my perspective it sure does seem like you were disagreeing with most of my points so I'll chalk things up to my stupidity.

As for the terminology, go-fasts started in the Marines. Why I don't know but the military has some long ass designation for running shoes or PT shoes. You'd be surprised how many things have a humorous nomenclatures to keep from quoting regs all day.
Sorry if I seemed argumentative or like I was disagreeing. Didn't mean to, just saying it seem like an odd term from an outside perspective.