The Art Pub - Show off your work & help each other out!

Kyuuji

Member
Nov 8, 2017
9,910
Some crazy amazing talent being shown off here, wow.

I used to draw and sketch a fair bit about a decade ago while in Uni but went with UI/UX and interface design coming out of it. 10 years later and I like where I am there creatively but I do wish I’d kept drawing over that time because I've definitely lost a lot of ground. That frustration when you have ideas but lack the means to put them on the page at the moment.

Would love to eventually be able to draw female character illustrations, primarily around Alice and Wonderland (thematically more than any specific depiction). Was never great at human form outside of life drawing, always preferring head and shoulders or masks and baggy costumes, alongside more cartoonish monsters.

Going to try and really force myself to break in and practice. It’s just rough starting from 0 again and producing most doodles that are.. rough, but have to bury that and keep with it. Browsing threads like this, and the illustration communities on Twitter and IG is just an endless source of inspiration. Genuinely one of my favourite things about the internet in 2019.

Will be keeping a keen eye out for new posts and any links people share.

For now thought have a humble candle ghost and an old sketch from just before I was out of commission for a month.




 
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Nature

Member
Nov 1, 2017
477
Thanks!

------------------------
It’s been 19 years since Mega Man Legends 2 came out in North America. This is a much revised version of fan art I did last year featuring 1 Servebot for each year.

Im really impressed by how prolific you are.

But i wanna give you some constructive criticism... Looking at your art in general I think you can improve your paintings a thousandfold if you improve your understanding of shadows and how you paint them.

Your biggest problem I think is that it seems you use the airbrush for blurry soft-edged shadows INSIDE the line art far too much. This leads to a more flattened, vague and pillowy look than if you were even just use simple cell shading (hard edged shadows with flat color) for everything, despite shadows being added.

Why? There are almost no HARD EDGES. Your line art is just holding everything because they are creating some hard edges for you. Hard edges are immensely important because they distinctly separate the light from the dark, and create the illusion of corners and turns of the figure turning away from the light. Effective use of hard edges in your shadows are what creates most of the representation of structure, 3-dimensionality and depth.

Here's an illustration by Dave Rapoza that shows you how effective simple hard edged shadows can be especially for line art. If all the shadows were airbrushed you wouldn't get this amount of definition of form without cutting back into them with a hard brush anyway. He also shifts the color temperature between light and shadow (warm to cool), which is something you should try to do also but I wont get into it too much.


However if you want rendering thats even more effective and naturalsitic then that then you have to know where a shadow should be hard or soft edged, and when to blend them together. Rapoza took this piece to the next level by doing exactly that:


Compare the two. Note which edges of shadow he chose to soften and blend and which he chose to keep hard. This is probably one of the most important fundamentals for designing an appealing and lifelike painting - you see this subtle interplay between hard and soft shadows in all of the greatest paintings, from the old masters to 19th century masters like Sargent to the best concept artists, illustrators and fine artists today. To practice this I'd recommend doing some paintings in which you turn off line art at a certian point so you are forced paint it using this principle.

Hopefully this made sense and wasn't just a long ramble, and I also hope this gives you an idea of how to bring your art to the next level.
 
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Akumatica

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,540
Im really impressed by how prolific you are.

But i wanna give you some constructive criticism... Looking at your art in general I think you can improve your paintings a thousandfold if you improve your understanding of shadows and how you paint them.

Your biggest problem I think is that it seems you use the airbrush for blurry soft-edged shadows INSIDE the line art far too much. This leads to a more flattened, vague and pillowy look than if you were even just use simple cell shading (hard edged shadows with flat color) for everything, despite shadows being added.

Why? There are almost no HARD EDGES. Your line art is just holding everything because they are creating some hard edges for you. Hard edges are immensely important because they distinctly separate the light from the dark, and create the illusion of corners and turns of the figure turning away from the light. Effective use of hard edges in your shadows are what creates most of the representation of structure, 3-dimensionality and depth.

Here's an illustration by Dave Rapoza that shows you how effective simple hard edged shadows can be especially for line art. If all the shadows were airbrushed you wouldn't get this amount of definition of form without cutting back into them with a hard brush anyway. He also shifts the color temperature between light and shadow (warm to cool), which is something you should try to do also but I wont get into it too much.


However if you want rendering thats even more effective and naturalsitic then that then you have to know where a shadow should be hard or soft edged, and when to blend them together. Rapoza took this piece to the next level by doing exactly that:


Compare the two. Note which edges of shadow he chose to soften and blend and which he chose to keep hard. This is probably one of the most important fundamentals for designing an appealing and lifelike painting - you see this subtle interplay between hard and soft shadows in all of the greatest paintings, from the old masters to 19th century masters like Sargent to the best concept artists, illustrators and fine artists today. To practice this I'd recommend doing some paintings in which you turn off line art at a certian point so you are forced paint it using this principle.

Hopefully this made sense and wasn't just a long ramble, and I also hope this gives you an idea of how to bring your art to the next level.
Thanks for your critique. Just a note, and maybe it's just me, but whenever I get constructive criticism anywhere, they rarely say anything positive about my work which makes it hard to take the criticism onboard.

As for the hard shadows thing, you're right. I'm still not fully comfortable with hard edges and it's something I'll work on.

Regarding the Mega Man Legends artwork, it's an expanded version of a piece from a year ago and I wasn't going to re-render everything. If I was to draw it now I'd use this style inspired by the Persona series, anime shadows, light painted elements and gradients, that I did on this Pokemon piece from a few months ago-


The other thing is, I'm not going for realism at all in most of my work. Psychedelia, underground comix, Hindu religious art, manga & body horror are my main influences. I have a lot to get better at though- composition, anatomy, backgrounds, perspective, lighting and shadows etc... but I looked up Dave Rapoza's art and I find it boring. I'm a fan of painters like Robert Williams, Hyung Tae Kim and Simon Bisley-




Thanks again for your input! I'm hoping to get better all the time.
 
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Graefellsom

Avenger
Oct 28, 2017
648
That’s cool, looks straight off a sci-fi set.
thank you! Wet plate photography is a great process... I love that theres elements one can’t always control in it.

This is a one-off screenprint I did for my sisters birthday.. I wanna get round to doing a larger version of it tho..


It’s brain is a smaller cactus

theres so much great work in this thread
 

Kyuuji

Member
Nov 8, 2017
9,910
Im really impressed by how prolific you are.

But i wanna give you some constructive criticism... Looking at your art in general I think you can improve your paintings a thousandfold if you improve your understanding of shadows and how you paint them.

Your biggest problem I think is that it seems you use the airbrush for blurry soft-edged shadows INSIDE the line art far too much. This leads to a more flattened, vague and pillowy look than if you were even just use simple cell shading (hard edged shadows with flat color) for everything, despite shadows being added.

Why? There are almost no HARD EDGES. Your line art is just holding everything because they are creating some hard edges for you. Hard edges are immensely important because they distinctly separate the light from the dark, and create the illusion of corners and turns of the figure turning away from the light. Effective use of hard edges in your shadows are what creates most of the representation of structure, 3-dimensionality and depth.

Here's an illustration by Dave Rapoza that shows you how effective simple hard edged shadows can be especially for line art. If all the shadows were airbrushed you wouldn't get this amount of definition of form without cutting back into them with a hard brush anyway. He also shifts the color temperature between light and shadow (warm to cool), which is something you should try to do also but I wont get into it too much.


However if you want rendering thats even more effective and naturalsitic then that then you have to know where a shadow should be hard or soft edged, and when to blend them together. Rapoza took this piece to the next level by doing exactly that:


Compare the two. Note which edges of shadow he chose to soften and blend and which he chose to keep hard. This is probably one of the most important fundamentals for designing an appealing and lifelike painting - you see this subtle interplay between hard and soft shadows in all of the greatest paintings, from the old masters to 19th century masters like Sargent to the best concept artists, illustrators and fine artists today. To practice this I'd recommend doing some paintings in which you turn off line art at a certian point so you are forced paint it using this principle.

Hopefully this made sense and wasn't just a long ramble, and I also hope this gives you an idea of how to bring your art to the next level.
I love these examples, thanks for sharing them.
 

Nature

Member
Nov 1, 2017
477
Thanks for your critique. Just a note, and maybe it's just me, but whenever I get constructive criticism anywhere, they rarely say anything positive about my work which makes it hard to take the criticism onboard.

As for the hard shadows thing, you're right. I'm still not fully comfortable with hard edges and it's something I'll work on.

Regarding the Mega Man Legends artwork, it's an expanded version of a piece from a year ago and I wasn't going to re-render everything. If I was to draw it now I'd use this style inspired by the Persona series, anime shadows, light painted elements and gradients, that I did on this Pokemon piece from a few months ago-


The other thing is, I'm not going for realism at all in most of my work. Psychedelia, underground comix, Hindu religious art, manga & body horror are my main influences. I have a lot to get better at though- composition, anatomy, backgrounds, perspective, lighting and shadows etc... but I looked up Dave Rapoza's art and I find it boring. I'm a fan of painters like Robert Williams, Hyung Tae Kim and Simon Bisley-

Thanks again for your input! I'm hoping to get better all the time.
The cell shading in that Pokemon piece is honestly a better choice than only vaguely glazing over where you think the shadows should be on the figure with a soft brush. Looks cleaner, is more descriptive of the change of shape in the forms, and just looks less... amateurish if you do it with finesse. You can even just try blending some shadow edges of your cell shaded drawings to give them more subtlety and variety.

This is important because its just how light and shadow works in reality. Hard edges and sudden changes in shape cast hard edged shadows. Gradual transitions in shape create soft shadows as it slowly turns away from the light. So a painting with variation in the edges of its shapes naturally looks more convincing and visually interesting.

Hyung Tae Kim's art is 100% a perfect example. Examine how he paints his characters and you'll find hard edged shadows being blended into soft transitions everywhere. Of course he understands everything else extremely well like anatomy and drapery to do this so effectively... But this manipulation of edges seems to be a key thing to bringing your finished paintings to a higher level no matter your style or subject matter.

You could easily write a book on the nuances of light, shadow and rendering and how to do effectively employ them into your artwork... Like Scott Robertson and James Gurney already have. So I'll just say try to get out of your comfort zone and do some more learning and experimentation on this subject and I think you'll make massive improvements... Because you definitely have no shortage of ideas and are clearly able to put in work. Or what I might suggest is find an artist who makes art that's the closest to the direction you want to take your art, try to do some 1:1 copies of their paintings and apply that knowledge to how you paint your characters.
 
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Akumatica

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,540
The cell shading in that Pokemon piece is honestly a better choice than only vaguely glazing over where you think the shadows should be on the figure with a soft brush. Looks cleaner, is more descriptive of the change of shape in the forms, and just looks less... amateurish if you do it with finesse. You can even just try blending some shadow edges of your cell shaded drawings to give them more subtlety and variety.

This is important because its just how light and shadow works in reality. Hard edges and sudden changes in shape cast hard edged shadows. Gradual transitions in shape create soft shadows as it slowly turns away from the light. So a painting with variation in the edges of its shapes naturally looks more convincing and visually interesting.

Hyung Tae Kim's art is 100% a perfect example. Examine how he paints his characters and you'll find hard edged shadows being blended into soft transitions everywhere. Of course he understands everything else extremely well like anatomy and drapery to do this so effectively... But this manipulation of edges seems to be a key thing to bringing your finished paintings to a higher level no matter your style or subject matter.

You could easily write a book on the nuances of light, shadow and rendering and how to do effectively employ them into your artwork... Like Scott Robertson and James Gurney already have. So I'll just say try to get out of your comfort zone and do some more learning and experimentation on this subject and I think you'll make massive improvements... Because you definitely have no shortage of ideas and are clearly able to put in work. Or what I might suggest is find an artist who makes art that's the closest to the direction you want to take your art, try to do some 1:1 copies of their paintings and apply that knowledge to how you paint your characters.
Nothing positive and my work is amateurish (even though I am an amateur). Right, no thanks.
 

Akumatica

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,540
Ok so you don't actually want advice or critiques? Hopefully the time and effort I put in to try to help you improve might be useful to others. Good luck.
I was polite in my initial reply even though I didn't ask, nor want any advice or critiques.

From the OP-
"A casual space to help answer questions, or provide constructive critiques when desired."

I'm fine learning and progressing on my own time, I'll ask for advice from artist's whose work I like or respect and I don't know you. Random advice this is just criticism is pretty worthless.

Thanks.
 

Prax

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,645
Nature's advice is good, but maybe you're not at a place to receive it or find parts of it useful yet, Akumatica! We all have our pace or developmental journeys, plateaus, and aspirations.

I keep wanting to draw more but I find that I socialize/online chat too much to have time for art on top of working fulltime. I'd have to be much more of a jerk and shut-in to focus on my craft lol. Sucks there arenlt 36 hours in a day to be able to do more things.
 

Akumatica

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,540
Nature's advice is good, but maybe you're not at a place to receive it or find parts of it useful yet, Akumatica! We all have our pace or developmental journeys, plateaus, and aspirations.
I recognized that in my first response to him, but again I wasn't asking or looking for a critique. I also don't respond well to non-constructive criticism especially when it's from someone I don't know, never interacted with or is telling me basic stuff that I was already aware of.

No one knows how much I have to learn or is as critical about my art more than I am. I spent more than 10 years online without ever posting any art and when I started doing so in early 2018, it was terrifying. I'm progressing as fast as possible and despite getting a dig here for posting and sharing so much art It's honestly my only outlet to express myself.
 

Ashlette

Member
Oct 28, 2017
1,123
I wish I had your mindset Akumatica. I'm just too critical of my own work to show more than a bust. Drawing outside my comfort zone is stressful, especially during times when other things like school demand more time and effort than usual.
 

Prax

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,645
I recognized that in my first response to him, but again I wasn't asking or looking for a critique. I also don't respond well to non-constructive criticism especially when it's from someone I don't know, never interacted with or is telling me basic stuff that I was already aware of.

No one knows how much I have to learn or is as critical about my art more than I am. I spent more than 10 years online without ever posting any art and when I started doing so in early 2018, it was terrifying. I'm progressing as fast as possible and despite getting a dig here for posting and sharing so much art It's honestly my only outlet to express myself.
You're doing great trying to get yourself out there.
It actually reminds me of when I was younger and started posting so much stuff, all my ideas etc. I'd do it again shamelessly if I had time lol

You come off defensive, but it's understandable. I used to be (and often still am) very Deviantart Autism brand of "look at my OCs! Do not steal! All copyrights to me! Don't make fun of them and their special hair and traumas! they are my precious babies!" and I'm in my 30s.

Art and stylization can be very personal, especially since you're mixing part of your spirituality into it. Enough people hate "anime" art despite its popularity, so something more niche like psychedelic almost "visual kei" art would be even harder to find good constructive advice about it.
 

Akumatica

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,540
You're doing great trying to get yourself out there.
It actually reminds me of when I was younger and started posting so much stuff, all my ideas etc. I'd do it again shamelessly if I had time lol

You come off defensive, but it's understandable. I used to be (and often still am) very Deviantart Autism brand of "look at my OCs! Do not steal! All copyrights to me! Don't make fun of them and their special hair and traumas! they are my precious babies!" and I'm in my 30s.

Art and stylization can be very personal, especially since you're mixing part of your spirituality into it. Enough people hate "anime" art despite its popularity, so something more niche like psychedelic almost "visual kei" art would be even harder to find good constructive advice about it.
I'm in my late 30's, I'm not on the spectrum and I'm an atheist.

I just don't understand, and get irritated by, random people who want to tell a stranger whats wrong with their art. I've never started berating someone who cooked a meal about their skills.

Posting online means taking in comments both positive and negative, but there's a difference between someone telling you that your fan art is the worst they've ever seen and someone criticizing your style, trying to teach you when they don't know what I'm prioritizing learning or striving for.
----------------

Anyway I did this for today's Inktober prompt -Dark. Dark Link from Zelda.
 
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Rendering...

Member
Oct 30, 2017
10,472
I was polite in my initial reply even though I didn't ask, nor want any advice or critiques.

From the OP-
"A casual space to help answer questions, or provide constructive critiques when desired."

I'm fine learning and progressing on my own time, I'll ask for advice from artist's whose work I like or respect and I don't know you. Random advice this is just criticism is pretty worthless.

Thanks.
That Megaman and Dark Link fanart you posted is dope, and I'm positive that a lot of people would agree. Consider sharing your art on Twitter with some hashtags to reach fans who would enjoy what you're doing. You can get tons of encouragement, and little to no criticism, by posting cool fanart and using tags to cast it into the sea of search results for any given series.

While you might not be interested now, Nature actually offered a good solid summary of edges with regard to lighting. It's quality advice, and they cited excellent sources. No worries if you choose to go in a stylized direction, but studying fundamentals is always worthwhile. Your art is advanced enough that you could reap serious benefits by learning more about lighting and applying it in a way that works for you.
 
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Akumatica

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,540
That Megaman and Dark Link fanart you posted is dope, and I'm positive that a lot of people would agree. Consider sharing your art on Twitter with some hashtags to reach fans who would enjoy what you're doing. You can get tons of encouragement, and little to no criticism, by posting cool fanart and using tags to cast it into the sea of search results for any given series.

While you might not be interested now, Nature actually offered a good solid summary of edges with regard to lighting. It's quality advice, and they cited excellent sources. No worries if you choose to go in a stylized direction, but studying fundamentals is always worthwhile. Your art is advanced enough that you could reap serious benefits by learning more about lighting and applying it in a way that works for you.
Hi, I post my art on-
-Resetera
-6 different Discords
-Twitter
-Instagram
-Deviantart
-Artstation
-Pixiv
-Tumblr
-Pinterest
-Reddit
-Kofi
-Patreon

I use hashtags, tag official accounts when I do fan art, submit art to groups, join in art art share threads, participate in art challenges, enter contests and do art for streamers I like.

I have a ton of books, and saved tutorials and I never discounted the fundamentals of lighting and shadows, rim lighting bounce lighting atmospheric perspective or anything else.

Also constructive criticism is great when you ask for it, this thread helped me a lot last year when Raging Spaniard was offering art advice. My ambition exceeds my ability and I post what I can manage to make presentable enough to be happy with, while slowly incorporating new things I've learned in the last 18 months.

But please, let's not derail this thread anymore. Just ignore my art and I'll continue making it. Thanks!❤
 

AshGambit

Member
Sep 4, 2019
26
Wow, some incredible stuff in here. I recently bought an iPad and Apple pencil because I fancied trying to get back into art after probably 12 years (damn I'm getting old!). This is the best I can manage at the minute and I'm feeling super overwhelmed like I'll never improve!



Did this to print off for my soon to be born daughter, due date is tomorrow but no signs of showing up yet! And we've decided to name her Robyn.
 

Delphine

Honk honk!
Moderator
Mar 30, 2018
2,442
France
Quickly colored this rough sketch I did during a Drink N' Draw session. I need to go back to drawing and painting, bit by bit.



(props to anyone who can recognize her: you have good taste)
 
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killertofu

Banned
Oct 28, 2017
897
A dumb question but does anyone have favorite type of pencil sharpener they use? Electronic or otherwise.

I ended up taking a Drawing Fundamentals class at Gnomon (A visual effects and game design school). Its kind of kicking my ass, I'm still not used to seeing things in shapes or in perspective. Also feel really old for some reason as a 29 year old with these 18-19 year olds.
 

Rama

Member
Sep 14, 2019
13
Yoshi x Metroid fan art I just finished-



This blew up for me on Reddit. Front page!


I also created a process breakdown for this piece if anyone is interested-

Dude this is awesome! Thank you for posting that breakdown, it’s fascinating to see how much work goes into something like this.
 

Cortez

Member
Oct 29, 2017
789


Finished this last night, been working on it on/off the last week. I’ve never tried imitating the classic Sonic style before so had literally no fucking idea what I was doing pretty much the entire time but it came together in the end somehow lol
 

Foot

Member
Mar 10, 2019
2,482


Finished this last night, been working on it on/off the last week. I’ve never tried imitating the classic Sonic style before so had literally no fucking idea what I was doing pretty much the entire time but it came together in the end somehow lol
You can’t tell me this isn’t official art!! Wow!
 

Nature

Member
Nov 1, 2017
477
A dumb question but does anyone have favorite type of pencil sharpener they use? Electronic or otherwise.
I like the Kum Long Point pencil sharpener. As it says on the tin it has two separate blades that you use to sharpen your pencils to a longer taper and finer point than normal pencils. Really useful because obviously it keeps your pencil from becoming dull as quick.

I recognized that in my first response to him, but again I wasn't asking or looking for a critique. I also don't respond well to non-constructive criticism especially when it's from someone I don't know, never interacted with or is telling me basic stuff that I was already aware of.

No one knows how much I have to learn or is as critical about my art more than I am. I spent more than 10 years online without ever posting any art and when I started doing so in early 2018, it was terrifying. I'm progressing as fast as possible and despite getting a dig here for posting and sharing so much art It's honestly my only outlet to express myself.
My man, my comments on your work were intended to be 100% constructive and in good faith, don't take it personally. I like talking about art and helping other people so I figure I'd share some ideas with you. But I dont think its fair to assume you'll only receive constructive criticism only when asked for when you continually post in a thread about helping eachother out as well as sharing.

I won't give you any futher advice about your art but I urge you to reconsider your mindset on how open you are about feedback. There is little value in only wanting to hear how good your art is besides just a momentary ego boost. Honest constructive criticism with no bullshit however can make a world of difference in your knowledge and giving you more awareness of how your art truly appears to your audience. I mean that's part of why would go to art school or atelier lol.

This reminds me of a point made in a lecture about the habits of successful artists by Andrew Price of Blender Guru. He references a quote from the founder of the Gnomon school on what separates the small percentage of incredible students from the rest. Keep in mind the average student at Gnomon becomes very good and succesful regardless.
What separates the rockstars from the average; they seek criticism and actually listen to it.
 
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Akumatica

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,540
Again from the OP-

In this thread, it is extremely encouraged to help and motivate other posters when they share their work!
I am not motivated by random criticism. At all. Everyone learns with different ways and methods. I've experience enough hostility about my art growing up that I don't want, or respond to, just negative criticism.

This has always been my definition of constructive criticism-
"Constructive criticism is the process of offering valid and well-reasoned opinions about the work of others, usually involving both positive and negative comments, in a friendly manner rather than an oppositional one."

A casual space to help answer questions, or provide constructive critiques when desired.
This is my understanding of this thread .

"What separates the rockstars from the average; they seek criticism and actually listen to it."
And the point is, I wasn't seeking it. Not at this time. Ask if you can provide a few pointers in the future and you won't get a reaction like that. You don't know what I'm going through in my personal life right now and your out of the blue critique just added to my stress. If you can't understand where I'm coming from then I don't know what else to say.

Thanks.
 
OP
OP
Raging Spaniard

Raging Spaniard

Artist at EA Star Wars
Verified
Oct 25, 2017
2,195
I did this for Inktober today and wanted to post it here.

Some big improvement going on here. There is a marked step forward in how much more 3D this feels than some of your older work and your color choices are much more harmonious. Easily my favorite from yours.

This thread sucks at keeping me notified. Regarding HOW TO GIVE FEEDBACK I definitely have some thoughts that I’ll post later but for now if you want to provide 5 paragraphs of “advice” please be kind and ask the artist beforehand. Thank you.
 

Akumatica

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,540
Some big improvement going on here. There is a marked step forward in how much more 3D this feels than some of your older work and your color choices are much more harmonious. Easily my favorite from yours.
Thanks. That angle was a last minute change. Originally it was a standard side view, but I’d been using Inktober, and making sure to produce a full drawing everyday, to experiment.

This ended up taking me 6 hours to complete, the 2nd longest of any of my Inktober pieces behind the Dark Link one I did for day 26.

There’s a number of mistakes I need to fix when I revise it-
-The wind chime paper strips on her wrists are leaving shadows, but the ones in her hair aren’t.
- Her neck isn’t right.
- The visible leg looks way too small.
- The fingers holding the glass don’t look the right length compared to the thumb.
- Her ear needs to be tilted and slightly further back.
- I should add a light blue tint to the bubbles in the background and slightly blur them to promote a sense of depth.
- The arm holding the bubble wand drove me crazy and it’s still not right. Also, I might drop the angle of her beaded bracelet and the arm should be in shadow.

I’ve got books and have done tutorials on placing figures in perspective and It’s still like pulling teeth to get things to look good. It's one of those things I’ll need to work on.
 

Delphine

Honk honk!
Moderator
Mar 30, 2018
2,442
France
I watched Beyoncé's Homecoming documentary/concert some time ago, and was in awe at the diversity of bodies, in terms of shape and colors. And it touched me a lot. I strive for more diverse bodies in my art as well, so I took some screenshots and sketched some of them in a corner of my notebook. It's empowering how those backup dancers were giving their all, being charismatic and beautiful as hell, and looking as varied as they did. I personally felt seen, valued and celebrated. Coincidentally, I also watched Rihanna's Savage x Fenty show lately, and again, the same emphasis on body diversity was made. I'm so glad the both of them strived for a wider representation of women and their bodies in both of their shows. It's honestly a fucking breath of fresh air.

 
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OP
OP
Raging Spaniard

Raging Spaniard

Artist at EA Star Wars
Verified
Oct 25, 2017
2,195
My man, my comments on your work were intended to be 100% constructive and in good faith, don't take it personally
While you might not be interested now, Nature actually offered a good solid summary of edges with regard to lighting. It's quality advice
I wish I had your mindset Akumatica. I'm just too critical of my own work to show more than a bust. Drawing outside my comfort zone is stressful, especially during times when other things like school demand more time and effort than usual.
You're doing great trying to get yourself out there.
I dont mean to quote these posts specifically, I just dont know how to "quote" usernames any other way.

This will be long and rambly. This could be a future GDC lecture if polished but Im going to go off the cuff. Sorry in advance.

Lets talk about criticism. I know a thing or two about it. My art school, The Joe Kubert School, was the kind of place that 100 students would join and only 25 would graduate and part of that was the grueling schedule but another was the completely crushing way everyone was encouraged to critique you without giving two shits about your feelings.

Gotta weed out the weak and all. Right?

I was pretty much a convert. Make this experience as hard as possible so that "the real world" seems easy by comparison. I thrived in that environment and gave as good as I got. I gained critical analytical skills that I use daily, 19 years later. I learned the "constructive" in "constructive criticism" over the years and smoothed my edges over time. After all, I'm a professional with a high skillset, a dope job and a great support group so this method of teaching worked, I was proof of it.

However, I think a lot about the 75 people that dropped out. Im friends with them, theyre great artists but they work at Home Depot, their local grocery or just stay at home. Many got fulfilling jobs in other vocations. No shame at all but I always think about

"How can I help them"

"How did we fail them"

At the end of the day, people are responsible for their own happiness so Im not here with arrogance saying it was "my job" to steer their careers but it has made me realize over the past decade that the hardcore "hey, here is a thesis on your illustration, this is constructive! dont be mad!" should NOT be the default approach. That kind of critique, while seemingly helpful in nature can become very masturbatory, in a way, a method to distribute how much about a subject matter and I found the perfect artwork to disseminate my analysis. For the average artist, especially a hobbyist, it is NOT a good feeling to post something you worked hard on and you get something that YOU feel is helpful but the artist will probably read it like this



Maybe these artists would have become pros if we acknowledged that there are other ways to improve and make a living in the arts? Maybe somebody reacts better when given some room so they dont feel attacked all the time? Did you know that there arent a lot of female artists in games but there are TONS of female freelancers in anime and comic cons who are complete badasses and run their own businesses? Did you know they were told they werent tough enough in college or "couldn't hack it" when they joined the games industry?

Theres a lot of art, from my peers, from my friends, from my family, etc, that I have ssssssssstrong opinions over. Over the years I have been THE critique person and what always ends up happening is that you become the asshole, the sergeant, the "tough love" guy ... and you start believing it. Artists will stop showing you their work because theyre tired of always getting a lecture, tired of always feeling like shit for daring to draw something for fun. Does a heavy deep dive into a piece of art help the artist? Maybe! Sometimes! However, it MUST be desired by the artist, it MUST be communicated because that artist is not under your rule. Im a professional artist, I have a strong foundation and I can dissect strong opinions, grab whats useful and ignore the rest, my ego is not tied to that at all. I've been through the fires and I thrived, but thats not how most artists are because most artists are amateurs who should not be expected to be able to deal with a giant paragraph out of nowhere.

For instance, if Im a college art teacher, its my responsibility to learn each students quirks, to learn HOW they can learn better. At work, I'm actually in charge of handling the feedback we get from LucasFilm DIRECTLY to the artists, Im essentially "the bad news" guy so I have to take each artist into account and also mix in my OWN feelings about the art into account. Its fucking difficult! Heres how I recommend you do it in this forum

You start with common ground. Make it a conversation. Dont barf advice at anyone, even starting with "this is what I like" feels contrived. If you see art online that makes you feel a certain way just reach out to the artist and ASK questions about it. How long did it take, are you trying some new stuff, is this a color palette youre trying to get better at, would you be open to some in-depth opinions, what are your art influences. People, and artists, react well to others being INVESTED in their output because then it feels like a relationship between equals instead of an imbalance of power between the critiquer and the artist, one which is often uninvited. Empathy goes a long way here.

You can also offer critique slots, I did it last year and received a good response. "If you have something you want me to do a through critique on, Im available for "x" time" Once you build a certain level of trust then you can start dropping advice more often. Theres a handful of artists I have in a permanent open critique situation and I will send drawover and advice at anytime. Once you build some good faith and some common goals ("I want to get better at anatomy", "Id like to color the way you colored this piece") it can become really beneficial for both parties, I have learned a lot from teaching other people as it has allowed me to reconsider my process and basics.

Thats what I mean when I say "help each other out!" get INVOLVED in each others work, ask questions, collaborate, cheer, elevate the conversation when both parties agree theres something to gain out of it and thats how we will build a lasting art community here on ERA

Well, like I said, rambling and incoherent. Hopefully this resonated with someone out there. Im just a dude and I dont make the rules but I do think about this stuff a lot.
 

Dice

Member
Oct 25, 2017
5,018
Canada
There is so much style in this thread, my gooood

Ive been in an art rut, I might have to plug in here somepoint for a second (and third, fourth, etc) opinion on works.
 

Prax

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,645
haha, I was wondering what my quote had to do with anything. Are you shaming my encouragement! LOL
And I know we had similar issues with the old thread on GAF, where uninvited advice, even if sugarcoated, could make someone feel discouraged. People's relationships with their art can be complex.

I finally finished my first Fire Emblem Three Houses route.. after 148 hours.. gaming is hard work! So now I can draw a celebratory Claude von Riegan thing later.
Also got a very prestigous spot in the Fire Emblem Compendium via ninja typing/refresh skills to snag Edelgard von Hresvelg in her timeskip garb (previous artist dropped out?).
Due in two weeks, so wish me luck!
 

Nature

Member
Nov 1, 2017
477


Finally done with this long study for now. The goal right now is to strengthen my control over rendering techniques and form and value. I learned SO much about painting with just this one study - its a big milestone for me to paint something so subtle and complex to this level of finish at this point.

Doing this piece I found it a necessity to use my brush at low opacity/flow to achieve such subtle blends and changes in value. Lasso is also your best friend for easily creating hard edges and fine details with accuracy, especially in busy areas like the hair.

Here's the reference I used, I'm certain some proportions are wonky. I haven't toyed around with using the mixer brush too much but it seems like it could be very useful. Any critiques or advice is welcomed.
 
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luffie

Member
Dec 20, 2017
437
Indonesia
Haven't posted here lately, here goes 2!


Eva Roux from Code Vein will also be featured by Bandai Namco on their twitter and IG on December!! Woo hoo!!!