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The Black Culture Community [OT 4] - Melanin and Estrogen - The new Kryptonite

Oct 31, 2017
1,065
Hey all,
Ya boy got booted for a week for not being outraged over Mr. Taken. I was going to go on a rant but won't do me any good. So just in case I ain't outraged over the next thing. What are some good sites for video game news.
 
Oct 27, 2017
12,007
Granted if you watch the video you see the title and tweet are a bit clickbaity, but they nigga got Google, don't they?! Being ignorant in this day and age when you have a wealth of informational resources at your fingertips is a bit hard to excuse

Crazy to me how much I used to love anime compared to now where I genuinely despise most of it with few exceptions. The change for me started only recently as I started to notice how they can draw other races of humans without the exaggerated racial features but for some reason they're incapable of doing in regards to black people.
Really? What series are you talking about? I don't think I've seen super exaggerated black people since like Dragonball or those handful of series where black people are just the cursing violent foreigners that are in it for a scene (and I don't fuck with those series anyway). If anything, series with black people usually have them with cool designs (Black Lagoon, Soul Eater, Naruto, Bleach for the most part, etc)
 

Slayven

You probably post about me on another board.
Moderator
Oct 25, 2017
31,262
You've made it this long and you're older than some of our national parks. Don't put the responsibility of removing something ancient from the earth on me.
Crash upon me like the waves upon the eternal shore and be broken
 
Oct 30, 2017
3,439
Miami, FL
Watch it. It's Black History Month. it's fucking dope I wouldn't fail you. I need somebody to talk to about it. PLEASE!!!!
As it is Black History Month & I want us to promote excellence, I will always advise against Siempre Bruja.

They could've made a good show but they did not and everytime I see a Black person or any PoC ask if they should see it?

Here's my thread of why it's an insult. I'll always post this because no, hard no.

 
Oct 25, 2017
2,303
We live in a nation that spends more than $260 billion each year responding to crime—more than any other country in the world. In this time of limited economic resources, it is imperative that we ask ourselves whether this enormous investment in public safety is delivering a sufficient return. By many measures, the answer to that question is “no.” One such measure is recidivism. The sad truth is that 43% of offenders released from our nation’s prisons and jails are reincarcerated within three years. In California, where spending on adult and juvenile corrections totaled $5 billion in 2010–114 and law enforcement spending tops $14 billion each year, the figure is a staggering 61%. From my perspective as a career prosecutor and currently as the “top cop” in the nation’s largest state, that means our criminal justice system is failing us—not just the law enforcement community, but society as a whole—six out of every ten times.

For police officers, prosecutors, public defenders, judges, and jailers, recidivism is a frustrating, yet almost universally accepted, reality. The cycle is all too familiar: arrest, convict, incarcerate, release, and repeat. However, repeat offenders are far more than an occupational nuisance for those charged with upholding the law. Recidivism drains our public coffers of the already scant resources we need to protect victims and serve our communities. In California alone, a 10% reduction in recidivism would result in $233 million in annual savings. That is to say nothing of the societal toll that recidivism exacts. With each stay in jail or prison, offenders become more skilled and more hardened criminals, with many eventually graduating to more serious offenses. As a result, our communities are not made any safer, and victims of crime receive little reassurance that the injustices visited upon them will not be repeated. Meanwhile, the families of offenders participating in this cycle of criminal activity and reincarceration are directly impacted by the loss of a spouse, a parental figure, a caretaker, or a breadwinner.
To understand the “smart on crime” approach, it helps to think of the sprawling universe of criminal offenses as a pyramid. At the top of the pyramid are the most heinous crimes—the murders, rapes, and violent assaults. These offenses are at the top of our pyramid not just because of the severity of the damage the perpetrators inflict upon their victims, but because they constitute the minority of all crimes committed. Over the course of my career, I have prosecuted many of these offenders, some of them so abhorrent that my first and only priority was to remove them from free society for a long time—sometimes, forever. While most people imagine top-of-the-pyramid behavior when they think of the word “crime,” it is the non-serious, nonviolent, and non-sexual offenses—known in California as “triple-nons”—that make up the majority of crimes committed in the United States each year. Only a quarter of all those admitted to federal prison, for example, are violent offenders. In California, three-quarters of all felony arrests are for nonviolent offenses. It is these non-violent, non-serious offenses—and the outdated, misguided way in which our criminal justice system handles them—that are eating away at the resources needed to fight more serious crimes.

Let me be clear: I am not suggesting that because these offenses are less serious, they are less important. There must be consequences and accountability for all crimes. Nonviolent crime can have a devastating impact, both economic and societal, and it must be addressed swiftly and surely. There must be accountability for breaking the law, but these offenses must be addressed effectively. Being smart on crime means using the resources we spend on offenders more productively to reduce the odds of reoffending. Nonviolent offenders frequently have little in the way of job skills or education, suffer from mental illness, or struggle with addiction. While the odds are stacked against them, one thing is certain: they will eventually be released from jail or prison. Our society has a profound stake in working to make sure that the perpetrators of nonviolent crime do not escalate their criminal behavior. Otherwise, we are simply perpetuating the never-ending cycle of prison terms and releases.
http://harvardlpr.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/08/HLP205.pdf

"You betta listen to your corner, and watch for the hook"
 
Oct 27, 2017
12,007
Are people actually reading what Harris is saying or just responding to the tweet?

http://harvardlpr.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/08/HLP205.pdf

"You betta listen to your corner, and watch for the hook"
What the tweet selectively pointed out and what your quotes do tell VASTLY different stories about her thoughts on criminal justice. For instance, in your quotes

In California alone, a 10% reduction in recidivism would result in $233 million in annual savings. That is to say nothing of the societal toll that recidivism exacts. With each stay in jail or prison, offenders become more skilled and more hardened criminals, with many eventually graduating to more serious offenses. As a result, our communities are not made any safer, and victims of crime receive little reassurance that the injustices visited upon them will not be repeated. Meanwhile, the families of offenders participating in this cycle of criminal activity and reincarceration are directly impacted by the loss of a spouse, a parental figure, a caretaker, or a breadwinner.
Is pretty clearly stating that jailing people over and over is not the best option and it only pushes them further into criminality

In California, three-quarters of all felony arrests are for nonviolent offenses. It is these non-violent, non-serious offenses—and the outdated, misguided way in which our criminal justice system handles them—that are eating away at the resources needed to fight more serious crimes.
There must be accountability for breaking the law, but these offenses must be addressed effectively. Being smart on crime means using the resources we spend on offenders more productively to reduce the odds of reoffending. Nonviolent offenders frequently have little in the way of job skills or education, suffer from mental illness, or struggle with addiction. While the odds are stacked against them, one thing is certain: they will eventually be released from jail or prison. Our society has a profound stake in working to make sure that the perpetrators of nonviolent crime do not escalate their criminal behavior.
Again, a denouncement of indiscriminate incarceration for crimes that don't warrant it.

That tweet seems like someone simply picking out a clickbait quote and not even doing the due diligence to read what she said and understand what she meant, unless other parts of her dissertation (?) contradict these parts
 
Oct 25, 2017
2,303
Again, a denouncement of indiscriminate incarceration for crimes that don't warrant it.

That tweet seems like someone simply picking out a clickbait quote and not even doing the due diligence to read what she said and understand what she meant, unless other parts of her dissertation (?) contradict these parts
The Russians are going to keep us on our toes the next two years.
 
Oct 27, 2017
2,056
Are people actually reading what Harris is saying or just responding to the tweet?



What the tweet selectively pointed out and what your quotes do tell VASTLY different stories about her thoughts on criminal justice. For instance, in your quotes



Is pretty clearly stating that jailing people over and over is not the best option and it only pushes them further into criminality





Again, a denouncement of indiscriminate incarceration for crimes that don't warrant it.

That tweet seems like someone simply picking out a clickbait quote and not even doing the due diligence to read what she said and understand what she meant, unless other parts of her dissertation (?) contradict these parts
Good points. Harris is complicated, especially when it comes to her record as a prosecutor. I think she's had trouble balancing the politics of being tough on crime with the image of progressive politics. That's always tricky when it comes to California Democrats who hold higher offices (like Pelosi). Corporate Dems and Progressive Dems start to run together by the time you get up to the level of Governor, AG, or federal offices.

Digging through shit like this for the primary is going to be exhausting.