• The GiftBot 2.0 Launch Giveaway Extravaganza has come to a close with an astounding 8073 games given away to the community by 696 members, a huge success thanks to you! The gifting now continues with more official prizes in the new Gaming Giveaways |OT|. Leftover Steam codes are also being given away to the PC Gaming Era community.

The glitter industry has a secret

Dozer

Member
May 30, 2019
55
Orlando, FL
It's almost certainly toothpaste.

The tiniest glitter Glitterex makes is 50 by 75 microns
That's microscopic. You aren't feeling that in there but the metallic sheen in pretty much every toothpaste? Bingo.


Edit: And if it's not toothpaste, it's reflective road signs.
 
Last edited:

jacktuar

Member
Oct 25, 2017
6,440
I also think toothpaste. And they don’t want people to know because then people would feel weird about putting toothpaste in their mouth.
 

Dan-o

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,136
I genuinely don't think it's something humans eat or could be at risk of eating. No way that'd fly.

It's gotta be guns. Think about it. Imagine all the die-hard gun nerds finding out that their trusty super-manly killing machines were really just made from glitter.

Guns, y'all.
Fucking guns.
 

Tfritz

Member
Oct 25, 2017
5,793
It's a substance that Mariah Carey wills into existence when she hits those high notes as described in hit 2001 documentary "Glitter"
 

Airegin

Member
Dec 10, 2017
2,141
Deodorant seems the most likely answer to me.

Edit: actually, make-up makes more sense.
 

cognizant

Member
Dec 19, 2017
5,563
I genuinely don't think it's something humans eat or could be at risk of eating. No way that'd fly.
Whatever it is, if it's really dodgy, I'm quietly confident it's not available in Europe. But in the US anything flies! Fructose syrup, machine guns, plastic BPA, glitter toothpaste...

 

Owl

Member
Oct 25, 2017
911
California
Stuff like that is usually disclosed.
But would it need to be specific? Cause toothpaste already has do not eat and various warning labels on it.

Accounting for most of the company's sales and not wanting to keep it secret because people won't like glitter being in whatever it is, toothpaste seems like the best bet.
 

Tobor

Member
Oct 25, 2017
3,531
Richmond, VA
Everyone knows 99% of all glitter is used on strippers and then is transferred to strip club customers through lap dances, also known as glitter transference.
 

bytesized

Member
Oct 27, 2017
1,976
Amsterdam
From Wikipedia

Due to its unique characteristics, glitter has also proven to be useful forensic evidence. Because of the tens of thousands of different commercial glitters, identical glitter particles can be compelling evidence that a suspect has been at a crime scene. Forensic scientist Edwin Jones has one of the largest collections of glitter consisting of over 1,000 different samples used in comparison of samples taken from crime scenes. Glitter particles are easily transferred through the air or by touch, yet cling to bodies and clothing, often unnoticed by suspects.[19]
 

Septimus Prime

EA
Verified
Oct 25, 2017
4,610
I'm in Team Money. Those numbers that look metallic and change color when viewed from different angles? That's probably it. Nothing else is really worth the secrecy.
 

lenovox1

Member
Oct 26, 2017
3,806
But would it need to be specific? Cause toothpaste already has do not eat and various warning labels on it.

Accounting for most of the company's sales and not wanting to keep it secret because people won't like glitter being in whatever it is, toothpaste seems like the best bet.
Yeah. But Proctor and Gamble also does disclose that they use PE in their Crest toothpaste for decorative effect. Apparently, it's also in gum. Some exfoliating face washes also use it. Polyethylene ground down fine enough is considered food safe in the US.


That might be it, but it seems overly cautious. P&G and the food companies have to disclose that stuff in the ingredients list. 🤷

(Do read the ingredients list to ensure that you're not using a product that contains polyethylene, as we all know microplastics are terrible for the environment and are invading our water supply.)

ETA: I think P&G stopped using PE and started using mica, a natural mineral. At least in their Pro Health line.


I think glitter is still in some gums and in face washes, though.

I thought mica made toothpaste sparkle?
It does now after Crest got into media trouble.
 
Last edited:

Ketch

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,116
The best guess I heard was toothpaste.
It’s sparkly and you put it in your mouth but you’re not suppose to consume it
 

linnus

Member
Oct 25, 2017
236
I'm pretty sure that there's glitter on my toothpaste. (It's one of the reasons that I buy it tbh)
 

Sankt Ra

Member
Oct 27, 2017
1,846
Glitter is used in peeling creams and a lot of shower body soaps oils etc. It is in toothpaste, and kids dentures ... And a lot of beauty products. Basically everything that sparkles has this shit in it.