The greatest painting in all of human history is Titian's Assumption of the Virgin

May 20, 2018
5,239
Ponds
It's ok. Too many naked babies for my taste though.

This is my personal favorite:

I went backwards in the page numbers not believing that someone wouldn’t post this, finally I found someone who has. Ivan the Terrible is my favorite painting just for the sheer regret in his eyes. It’s like you are a servant inside that room just quietly observing.
Yeah, not a fan, sorry OP.

I like Ivan Konstantinovich Aivazovsky and his obsession with the sea.

This one is also probably a new favorite of mine, the water is striking with how detailed it is. Seems hard to believe that it’s a painting.
 
Oct 26, 2017
1,473
It’s cliche, but my favorite painting of all time is The Starry Night.



It’s the only piece of art to ever make me feel something beyond “ooooooo that’s a pretty picture.”
 

cognizant

Member
Dec 19, 2017
4,400
Every Caravaggio painting in this thread features a woman beheading a man. Can anyone explain wtf is going on there? (I know I could google, but it's more fun this way)

I've been thinking of art lately. I'm on a massive Roman history binge, so naturally I googled art depicting the Romans but they're mostly depressing lol. For example, this painting by Jean-Léon Gérôme of lions about to devour Christians was particularly haunting:



Not something I want on my walls!

I entered this thread posting Ivan Konstantinovich Aivazovsky so I'm probably gonna get one of his non-people-drowning paintings to be honest. I like these two:



(can't find a decent image of this via simple google search)


Keep posting art everyone! I need inspiration for art to put on my wall, preferably non-depressing shit because my mind is already chaotic enough, I need to contrast it with calm art. Currently the list of artists I enjoy and wouldn't mind up on my wall are:

Ivan Konstantinovich Aivazovsky
Albert Bierstadt
 

WGMBY

Member
Oct 27, 2017
264
Boston, MA
my gf really likes Saturn Devouring His Son
I was just thinking of this one as well. Not sure why I like it so much, it's gross and kinda ugly, but it gives me such a strong sense of disquiet every time I see it. There are few paintings that I can think of that I still get the same feeling from after seeing them a hundred times.
 

Pellaidh

Member
Oct 26, 2017
768
Not much of an art expert, but if we're posting favourite paintings, the two that made a lasting impression on me would be:


The Raft of the Medusa (Théodore Géricault)


and A Burial At Ornans (Gustave Courbet)


Although just their pictures online don't really do justice to how massive these are in person.


In terms of just the best name for a painting, I don't think anything will ever top Courbet's "The Origin of The World" (L'Origine du monde). Which I'm not going to post here, because it's super NSFW.
 

teague

Member
Dec 17, 2018
615
Someone already posted my fave last year; saw this in person at the Clark in Williamstown, MA, and it's wayyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyy bigger than you would think, absolutely sublime in person.
Favorite Sargent painting

In order to contribute something other than just quoting, the light in the Aivazovsky's reminded me how much I love JMW Turner (thanks Cognizant, very lovely):



Wreckers Coasts of Northumberland, JMW Turner, sorry quality could be better
 

cognizant

Member
Dec 19, 2017
4,400
In order to contribute something other than just quoting, the light in the Aivazovsky's reminded me how much I love JMW Turner (thanks Cognizant, very lovely):



Wreckers Coasts of Northumberland, JMW Turner, sorry quality could be better
Just googled the guy and I like his work! He's also done Roman theme stuff too. Apparently Tate Britain has a ton of his art on display so I might visit this weekend.

 

TheGameshark

Member
Oct 27, 2017
1,767
Catonsville, MD
Someone already posted my fave last year; saw this in person at the Clark in Williamstown, MA, and it's wayyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyy bigger than you would think, absolutely sublime in person.
lol man I would kill to see it person. The NGA is a short train ride away for me and they have a great collection of Sargent but nothing beats that painting. I sporadically go through NE so maybe one day I'll stop there.
 

teague

Member
Dec 17, 2018
615
Just googled the guy and I like his work! He's also done Roman theme stuff too. Apparently Tate Britain has a ton of his art on display so I might visit this weekend.

There was an amazing retrospective at the de Young in San Francisco a few years ago that had all of the Roman/Aeneas paintings together for the first time. Love this one and also "Mercury sent to admonish Aeneas," which looks amazing in person if not on a screen (also at Tate now apparently)

 

teague

Member
Dec 17, 2018
615
lol man I would kill to see it person. The NGA is a short train ride away for me and they have a great collection of Sargent but nothing beats that painting. I sporadically go through NE so maybe one day I'll stop there.
The Clark is worth a trip, not big but for my money the best museum per square foot in America!
 

aBIGeye

Member
Nov 2, 2017
294
Every Caravaggio painting in this thread features a woman beheading a man. Can anyone explain wtf is going on there? (I know I could google, but it's more fun this way)
It's a (weirdly "feminist") episode from the Bible, Judith and Holofernes. TL,DR guy was sieging the city and she goes full secret agent in undercover mission in his encampment, kills him in his sleep and drunk.
 

jcs

Member
Aug 7, 2018
1,711
Every Caravaggio painting in this thread features a woman beheading a man. Can anyone explain wtf is going on there? (I know I could google, but it's more fun this way)
Caravaggio has a specific complex about beheadings and making himself the beheaded victim. Many theories are posited why but the most common is that Caravaggio was not the most moral guy (lot of fights and a terrible personality to say the least) but he was deeply religious and thus had a super guilty conscience.
 

cognizant

Member
Dec 19, 2017
4,400
It's a (weirdly "feminist") episode from the Bible, Judith and Holofernes. TL,DR guy was sieging the city and she goes full secret agent in undercover mission in his encampment, kills him in his sleep and drunk.
Caravaggio has a specific complex about beheadings and making himself the beheaded victim. Many theories are posited why but the most common is that Caravaggio was not the most moral guy (lot of fights and a terrible personality to say the least) but he was deeply religious and thus had a super guilty conscience.
Thank you both for the info, very intriguing. After I'm done with my Roman book binge, I'm moving on to Middle Ages history. I might then move on to famous figures of the art world such as Da Vinci, Caravaggio and co.

There was an amazing retrospective at the de Young in San Francisco a few years ago that had all of the Roman/Aeneas paintings together for the first time. Love this one and also "Mercury sent to admonish Aeneas," which looks amazing in person if not on a screen (also at Tate now apparently)
I went to the British Museum last month to look at Roman artifacts, my first visit to a museum in years actually, and I was aghast at how everyone would just walk up to an exhibit, take a photo and then walk on. Literally no observation or reflection of what they were looking at. Almost everyone there was doing this. It's almost as bad as people who hold up their huge ipads at gigs to constantly take photos of the band. I reaalllly hope the visitors at the Turner collection are not this annoying lol.
 

Dante_727

Banned
Nov 6, 2017
216
I dont know much about art but I strongly love Mona Lisa. So thats the greatest paiting humanity has ever made imo
 

Dyle

The Fallen
Oct 25, 2017
7,379
Wisconsin
Recently read De Kooning: An American Master and really learned a lot about him and gained so much more respect for his work. He spent more than 3 years on Woman I and worked himself to the bone living a life of poverty even as some of his abstract work was starting to be accepted by the art elite and making it possible for him to make a decent paycheck. The move back towards the human figure was a seriously bold choice and the way he did it, informed by Vermeer and Rubens among others, is really fascinating. I had never realized that the far right section was added at the very end of painting it, she had previously been centered on the canvas but adding that little grey strip makes the whole composition feel even more unbalanced and disturbing



Every Caravaggio painting in this thread features a woman beheading a man. Can anyone explain wtf is going on there? (I know I could google, but it's more fun this way)
Judith and Holofernes became a popular motif in the Renaissance as scenes of violence and extreme emotion became more accepted as possible subjects, even within the church. It fit the Baroque aesthetics perfectly since it's a great fit for its dramatic use of chiaroscuro and motion, so it continued to see a lot of play. Caravaggio was a piece of shit who fought and probably killed a guy and several other artists used the theme to make it look like he was being beheaded as a commentary on his life of debauchery. Artemesia Gentilischi took the theme and turned it into a very explicitly feminist statement, turning her experience during a very public rape trial into the context of a biblical scene, among numerous other paintings. I've always felt that her take on Judith is the best of the period

 

Altazor

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,581
Chile
Not a particular painting but - I've always liked how Joaquín Sorolla painted water and reflections. Somehow he made it look real, or... even beyond "real", but it somehow stirred something in the viewer.



 

TheGameshark

Member
Oct 27, 2017
1,767
Catonsville, MD
Want to mention Alphonse Mucha's Slav Epic which is a series of 20 absolutely massive paintings depicting various events in the history of the Slavic peoples and this specific one, No.20: The Apotheosis of the Slavs, is my favorite. The paintings were hidden for over 20 years due to the initial fear of the Nazi's seizing them. While he's widely know for the Art Nouveau posters, this series is his Magnum opus IMO.



Others in the series I really like:




Just to give you an idea of how big these things are here's a photo of them hanging in the National Gallery in Prague . He did 20 of these things in 18 years.
 
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Kyuuji

Member
Nov 8, 2017
5,040
UK
Have no idea how you could ever come close to having a favourite when it comes to paintings so here's a few of my favourites from a recent trip to the gallery in Oslo:














 

cognizant

Member
Dec 19, 2017
4,400
Update: went to Tate Britain today and witnessed Turner up close. Stunning! I'm gonna have to grab me some custom prints from the Tate shop to decorate my walls. I'm all about Turner and Aivazovsky right now. Currently browsing all their work to select my favourites. Gonna take a while!
 

Stinkles

343 Industries
Verified
Oct 25, 2017
12,382
My favorite portrait is a Henry Raeburn painting of the Reverend Robert Walker skating on Duddingston Loch. It's serious, whimsical and take my word for it, the light and the impression of the frozen loch is spot on. I skated there myself once when I was a child, but used to walk around that area constantly from childhood to teens. It's also very stark and scottish.





My all time favorite painting of any kind, is this Turner, "The Fighting Temeraire" but the jjpeg does it no justice. It's a different painting IRL.


 

Marengo

Member
Oct 28, 2017
122
My three favourites;


The Taking of Christ - Carravaggio


Image of Anne - le Brocquy


Study after Velázquez's Portrait of Pope Innocent X - Bacon
 

Loxley

Member
Oct 25, 2017
3,455
Want to mention Alphonse Mucha's Slav Epic which is a series of 20 absolutely massive paintings depicting various events in the history of the Slavic peoples and this specific one, No.20: The Apotheosis of the Slavs, is my favorite. The paintings were hidden for over 20 years due to the initial fear of the Nazi's seizing them. While he's widely know for the Art Nouveau posters, this series is his Magnum opus IMO.



Others in the series I really like:




Just to give you an idea of how big these things are here's a photo of them hanging in the National Gallery in Prague . He did 20 of these things in 18 years.
So glad to see this mentioned. Mucha is my all-time favorite artist and the Slav Epic series are my favorite of his. It was a revelation when I learned about him in my art history classes back in college. Art Nouveau in general blew me away, but Mucha in particular struck a chord with me more than any other artist I'd previously learned about. I hope to one day be able to see the paintings in-person.
 

cognizant

Member
Dec 19, 2017
4,400
Went on a shopping binge today and got:

Ivan Aivazovsky






Turner:



I'll get some of their moodier better known work at a later point. These ones appealed to me more right now though. Aivazovsky's two Istanbul-themed works for my parents. His Venice lagoon and Turner's Riga are for me. Very calming on my chaotic mind.
 

TheGameshark

Member
Oct 27, 2017
1,767
Catonsville, MD
So glad to see this mentioned. Mucha is my all-time favorite artist and the Slav Epic series are my favorite of his. It was a revelation when I learned about him in my art history classes back in college. Art Nouveau in general blew me away, but Mucha in particular struck a chord with me more than any other artist I'd previously learned about. I hope to one day be able to see the paintings in-person.
Yeah I was totally blown when I first discovered about them which interestingly was well after I already knew who Mucha was. In my Modernism art history class we never went deeper into his work than the poster designs.I guess because the Slav Epic was done late in his career after Art Nouveau had come and gone but jeez its such an incredible achievement in painting. I recommend checking out his Le Pater drawings he did around the turn of the century if you haven't seen them. Truly incredible and sadly never get mentioned.
 

jcs

Member
Aug 7, 2018
1,711
Assuming the trend of people being less religious continues (you never know what will happen), I wonder how religious works of art will be seen in the future. I already have trouble getting some people to appreciate some of the most famous pieces because they're just clueless about the subject matter (I grew up Catholic so I immediate "understand" 99% of them). It's already hard for me to put myself in the shoes of the Counter-Reformation public of say, Rubens. Must be harder for someone who grew up without any knowledge of Christian culture.

I expect sculptures to fare better because they're a more immediate show of technical skill but religious works by Rubens or Titian might be less popular in the coming centuries. They'll still be talked about in academia, of course.

On the other hand, most non-religious and non-landscape famous paintings are based on Ovid's Metamorphosis (which no one reads any more), Greek mythology, and Roman religion and people still like the so maybe I am wrong.
 

cognizant

Member
Dec 19, 2017
4,400
Assuming the trend of people being less religious continues (you never know what will happen), I wonder how religious works of art will be seen in the future. I already have trouble getting some people to appreciate some of the most famous pieces because they're just clueless about the subject matter (I grew up Catholic so I immediate "understand" 99% of them). It's already hard for me to put myself in the shoes of the Counter-Reformation public of say, Rubens. Must be harder for someone who grew up without any knowledge of Christian culture.

I expect sculptures to fare better because they're a more immediate show of technical skill but religious works by Rubens or Titian might be less popular in the coming centuries. They'll still be talked about in academia, of course.

On the other hand, most non-religious and non-landscape famous paintings are based on Ovid's Metamorphosis (which no one reads any more), Greek mythology, and Roman religion and people still like the so maybe I am wrong.
As someone who is binging on everything about the Romans this year, I'm really enjoying all the depictions of Rome in art, fantastical depictions or otherwise, the themes that resonate are universal, such as Turner depicting the sunset on the Carthaginian empire. The religious stuff with naked flying babies though....eh, not so much for me lol. Religion has powerful visual metaphors though, so I think it will always be appreciated is my guess.

On my way home from the Tate Britain today I was pondering how much I'm enjoying discoverying 19th century art and how modern art just does nothing for me. I went to a uni close to the Tate Modern, so visited it often. I can't think of any modern art in that building that I saw over the last few decades that has left any meaningful impression on me. But then again, sometimes I walk by a small indie art shop selling paintings of local artists and occasionally get blown away lol.
 

jcs

Member
Aug 7, 2018
1,711
The religious stuff with naked flying babies though....eh, not so much for me lol. Religion has powerful visual metaphors though, so I think it will always be appreciated is my guess.
I think a lot of people forget that most art from before the 1800s was done for money and for a purpose... Titian, Caravaggio, Bernini were all passionate artists (and Bernini at least deeply religious) but their art was Counter-Reformation art and it had an agenda: inspire people's faith and either keep them Catholic or bring them back to Catholicism. They might not have had this in mind while creating the art but at least their patrons did. That world is very different from the one we live in now so I can see why people aren't interested in it vs. Neo-classical art that still promotes values somewhat relevant to our modern day.

I actually agree that OP's choice is a bit surprising and not very popular... I prefer Titian's Bacchus and Ariadne. But I still think even the most atheist person can appreciate Bernini's Ecstasy of St Theresa or Caravaggio's Conversion of St Paul.

In the very long term (400+ years) I can see people appreciating Christian art the way we appreciate Roman and Greek art even though we don't believe in their gods at all: it's part of a different culture.
 

signal

Member
Oct 28, 2017
16,686
Sorolla was definitely an expert in capturing sunny days at the beach and crafting beautiful paintings out of them
Something about the presence of small boats adds something. Paintings of ships are not rare, and people at the beach probably is not a rare subject either, but having a few small pleasure craft or whatever makes it seem like they are REALLY a maritime culture. Need to photoshop some blitzballs into the paintings.
 

jcs

Member
Aug 7, 2018
1,711
Not going to check 10 pages but I have been studying Vermeer and man, his stuff is beautiful. I remember in 2013 I got a chance to see Girl with a Pearl Earring here in NYC, and we have the Frick and Met with some of his work as well. I have Taschen's giant book of Vermeer paintings. They're very relaxing and just look nice.

Like Vermeer? Check out de Hooch, Faubritius, van Ostade!

https://www.nationalgallery.org.uk/paintings/pieter-de-hooch-a-woman-drinking-with-two-men

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Sentry_(painting)

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Adriaen_van_Ostade_-_The_Painter_in_His_Studio_-_WGA16748.jpg