The greatest painting in all of human history is Titian's Assumption of the Virgin

daxy

Member
Oct 25, 2017
6,066
I think the the best in-person experience I had with a painting was Malevich's black square.

It's just so square, man.
Legitimately one of my favorite works of art. It's incredibly bold, innovative, and forward thinking for the time (1915!). An answer to the question of whether it is possible to create art that doesn't rely on the crutch of reproducing the world and instead is expressed in a visual language of its own that is purely made up of color and shape. Genius.
 

Frump

Member
Oct 27, 2017
1,937
No, it's "Thai Food (Miami Beach)" by Hervé Di Rosa.


The imposing flat green surface that takes up about half the painting, the yellow sky, the incongruently detailed plants and trees, the bizarrely simplified cars, the black-yet-glowing dog lurking in the shadows, the way the power line seems to clip through the side of the building... it's hard to take your eyes off it.

Fun fact: the painting actually portrays a real restaurant, though it closed a few years ago.
I know this post is from months ago but I just gotta say I really like this painting and have never seen it before today.
 

cwmartin

Member
Oct 27, 2017
906
Y'all know Vermeer basically just traced, right? His use of color to depict realism and depth is great but it has been proven he traced his his art with early technology.
 

jcs

Member
Aug 7, 2018
1,700
When it comes to Christian-themed paintings I prefer the realism of Rembrandt and Caravaggio, the former especially.
 

Hitmeneer

Member
Oct 30, 2017
93
Y'all know Vermeer basically just traced, right? His use of color to depict realism and depth is great but it has been proven he traced his his art with early technology.
You know that that is just a theory and never proven, right? There are signs that it could have been the case, but no direct prove.

Furthermore, why would that even take away from his accomplishments? Like painting is just tracing and coloring in the blanks. The use of colors and light is not great, it is amazing and unmatched for centuries.
 

oberjin

Member
Oct 31, 2017
322
I can watch Canaletto's paintings for hours, there is so much details in all of them, that's crazy !!

 

cwmartin

Member
Oct 27, 2017
906
You know that that is just a theory and never proven, right? There are signs that it could have been the case, but no direct prove.

Furthermore, why would that even take away from his accomplishments? Like painting is just tracing and coloring in the blanks. The use of colors and light is not great, it is amazing and unmatched for centuries.
Oh I am not trying to take away anything from Vermeer at all. Amazing works of art that stand the test of time and will continue to be amazing for the rest of recorded humanity.

I do think though, it is important to understand the process to create works. Vermeer's realism was so far ahead of anyone at the same time that people couldn't believe (and still are amazed) that it was done "freehand". Vermeer's works and process have literally been recreated and the theory has serious support behind it.

It does NOTHING to remove any accomplishments of the works themselves. Tracing doesn't bring life and depth to painting, but it assisted in bringing realism in a time it was not possible.

And honestly, it's more of a testament to the impressiveness of Vermeer in all, than does to diminish anything.
 

Lichtsang

Member
Jan 2, 2018
3,025


I saw this masterpiece in Bologna last week. It's so powerful, it's outstanding.
It's called "The Great Wave off Kanagawa", by Katsushika Hokusai.
 
Oct 25, 2017
2,889
I wouldn't say it's my favorite, but I'm a sucker for Jan van Eyck's paintings.



they're the right amount of detailed without going overboard, and with enough mystical symbolism to whet my curiosity. The fact that he was painting such things in the 1400's (six hundred years ago) just blows my mind.

EDIT: So does van Eyck's use of colors and how he paints clothes. He just seems to give them actual weight.
This is genuinely amazing. The folds on the carpet are blowing my mind.
 

Mr. Fantastic

Alt-account
Banned
Apr 27, 2018
3,189
Been posted already but the only one that has stuck with me from my visit to El Prado has been "Saturn Devouring His Son"



The definition of haunting.
 

Hitmeneer

Member
Oct 30, 2017
93
Oh I am not trying to take away anything from Vermeer at all. Amazing works of art that stand the test of time and will continue to be amazing for the rest of recorded humanity.

I do think though, it is important to understand the process to create works. Vermeer's realism was so far ahead of anyone at the same time that people couldn't believe (and still are amazed) that it was done "freehand". Vermeer's works and process have literally been recreated and the theory has serious support behind it.

It does NOTHING to remove any accomplishments of the works themselves. Tracing doesn't bring life and depth to painting, but it assisted in bringing realism in a time it was not possible.

And honestly, it's more of a testament to the impressiveness of Vermeer in all, than does to diminish anything.
Then we are ok! :D
 

LeleSocho

Member
Dec 3, 2017
1,866
great, beautiful sculpture that one. Speaking of intricate marble details, this one always blows my mind. Queirolo's Il Disinganno.



HE MADE A NET OUT OF MARBLE JESUS FUCK
Yeah it resides in the Cappella di San Severo here in Napoli where the main attraction and centerpiece is the Cristo Velato (Veiled Christ) made by Giuseppe Sanmartino but whenever i go there i always go to its right to watch Il Disinganno, a much more impressive sculpture if you ask me.



As for paintings i prefer Scuola di Atene (School of Athens) or else something made by Caravaggio
 

FiveSide

Member
Oct 25, 2017
2,621
This is a fantastic thread and lots of favorites have already been posted already, so I'll just settle for one I really like that hasn't been posted yet, rather than what I consider the "greatest painting":



This is the London Madonna on the Rocks by Da Vinci (or, controversially, Da Vinci et al.). I've, ah, gotten in trouble before for my belief that, with an artist whose works include the literal Mona Lisa, my favorite face of his is actually in this painting. Specifically:



I have always found this face remarkable not just for its beauty, but for its universality. In its soft curves and warm, full cheeks it has a sort of feminine radiance, and yet there is in equal parts a masculine sharpness to the jaw and a subtly defined brow above the more delicate eyes that suggests a masculine structure. Whereas in a portrait the face is often centered and prominent, here this angel is not the subject at all, but merely an onlooker; it is precisely in this feeling that the angel is also an audience to the painting that there is a powerful air of mystery and attraction towards it, as if you're supposed to be looking at the Madonna (whose eyes, incidentally, aren't quite visible), but are inexorably drawn to this luminous individual off to the side instead. I would compare it to going to a music concert and seeing someone strikingly attractive in the audience across from you; a sort of incidental surprise at seeing a beauty that is incidental to the main event. And I think the more ambiguous sexuality ties masterfully into those feelings, as a symbol of the sort of uncertainty with which we would half-remember such a meeting. It is, in effect, a covert, meaningless glance at a beautiful nobody, tenderly immortalized in a painting where that moment lasts forever. It single-handedly makes the painting as a whole one of my favorite Da Vinci pieces.
 

fuchsdh

Member
Oct 25, 2017
3,759
great, beautiful sculpture that one. Speaking of intricate marble details, this one always blows my mind. Queirolo's Il Disinganno.



HE MADE A NET OUT OF MARBLE JESUS FUCK
That is, indeed, nuts.

As much as I love painting and think it's generally far more effective as art, I'll always be more impressed by sculptural skills.
 

astro

Member
Oct 25, 2017
15,020
Art is subjective right?

It boring to me. I'm sure the painting is very well done.

Something like this is much more interesting.